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LuvTheWild
2008-08-05, 01:59
I studied all the wood-stoves I could find on-line, bought a Bush Buddy (love it), then replicated it with tin cans, and wrote an article on that for Wilderness Way Magazine (current issue). I've continued experimenting, and now have it down to a single 4" x 6" can you could make entirely with a utility-knife if need-be, but tin-snips are nice for cutting the door. It weighs 3 oz., has ample air intake and exhaust, has a solid bottom to contain ash and embers, so leaves no trace, suspends burning wood above air-intake and ash-tray so it burns fast and clean for a long time without clogging or needing emptying, has a built-in wind-screen for flame, and can use an auxiliary aluminum foil around it if windy. Will fit into a 4.25" billy cooking can. (Open billy with side-of-seal opener so lid is re-useable, and add a coat-hanger wire bale.) Click on photos to enlarge:

SGT Rock
2008-08-05, 02:25
Another cool wood stove design. Thanks.

kmat
2008-08-05, 12:18
Luvthewild,
Is your article in the 13-4 issue and are there directions for DIY? Looks awesome!
kmat

MRH
2008-08-05, 12:35
Looks awesome,,, I've been experimenting with building a wood stove simular to that...
great job...

incognito
2008-08-05, 15:21
Really nice design. I like the way it looks when it's burning, great job!!!!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/Making20Tea2x3.jpg

.

SGT Rock
2008-08-05, 15:22
You make something like that don't you Zelph?

incognito
2008-08-05, 15:33
You make something like that don't you Zelph?


I made one out of a stainless steel Martha Stewart flour sifter. Worked really nice, the steel turned some pretty colors after being heated to high temps. At the time I had so many stoves I sold it at auction on WB. It was Marshal out of Texas that won it. She was sympathetic, placed an opening bid and won it:biggrin:

LuvTheWild
2008-08-05, 18:10
Luvthewild,
Is your article in the 13-4 issue and are there directions for DIY? Looks awesome!
kmat

Hi kmat

Thanks. The article is in the Wilderness Way 14-2 issue. Yes, there are general directions in it. Every stove I've made has been different in some way though, so I keep the directions loose to provide space for evolution. In that article I explore how to replicate the structures responsible for the peculiar clean and steady burn of the Bush Buddy, and have been pleased with the resulting stoves I've made, that function virtually as well.

Since writing that article, I've been looking at how to simplify the construction and make it easier for anyone to make a quick stove with the same basic functions.

Where the former design has four layers (outer shell with air intake around the bottom, inner shell with a big hole in the bottom for primary air feed and holes around the top for secondary hot air feed, the suspended ash-tray, and above that the grate) this simplified version aims to accomplish the functions of those four layers with a single can. It has the solid, leave-no-trace bottom of the outer layer, which in this version also serves as the ash-tray that allows a long burn without clogging and that heats the air that then comes up under the fire wood that is suspended, instead of by the grate, by the tabs folded in to also form the draft holes. Without the inner jacket it doesn't have the hot-air secondary burn, so the bottom holes are large enough to provide all the oxygen it needs for a complete, clean burn. [It burns a bit faster than the Bush Buddy, so I may be able to decrease the size of the air holes to conserve wood.] And instead of having a detachable pot-holder/windscreen, it's built in, so is stronger and simpler to use.

I've been invited by Christopher Nyerges, WW editor, to write a follow-up article with photos of this simplified version for issue 14-3, so will do so by the end of this month.

I'd suggest starting with this simplified version because it's so easy, and it works well, then make the four-layer version described in the 14-2 article to enjoy its superior burn (slower, hotter, more steady, less smoke) as long as the quarter inch of space between the layers and an air channel up through the burning wood are maintained.

incognito
2008-08-05, 18:42
Christopher Nyerges, WW editor, would be disappointed in you if he saw the photo of you using a commercial match to light the stove. He'll show you how to light it with flint and steel:biggrin:

LuvTheWild
2008-08-05, 21:31
Christopher Nyerges, WW editor, would be disappointed in you if he saw the photo of you using a commercial match to light the stove. He'll show you how to light it with flint and steel:biggrin:

Oh, I do (and teach) that too. Do you know about tinder cans? (known as "the quickest way from ember to flame." Take virtually any can, but a little V-8 can is great. Remove the top with a side-of-seal-opener so it can be re-seated (or with a knife, cut top off can just below shoulder so you can turn top over and stuff it into tinder-can's opening to douse flame - works also on beer or Pepsi cans), cut a cross in the side of the can, and attach a piece of wood or other hot-can-holder to the bottom. Bend in the four corners formed by the cross (to where you can get your finger back out). Then pack the can with dry pine needles or dry grass or dry mugwort leaves. Pre-char if pine-needles or grass, (or poke in a pinch of mugwort, charcloth, or charcoal). Get an ember from any of a multitude of methods (in either charcloth or charcoal made from rotten hard-wood - like oak) and put it in the cross hole. Be sure the lid is off, then blow the ember into a flame. When conditions are right, one long blow produces flame out top of can like a blow-torch, which can be directed at whatever you want to light. With the Bush Buddy or Can-Can Bush Buddy, I hold the packed stove almost upside down, with the tinder-can under it shooting up. With the Can Bush Buddy (the recent simpler design) just blow it into a bottom hole. Once stove is lit, put lid back onto tinder-can, and even though the cross-hole is still open, with no air-movement the smudge will soon extinguish. Can be used several times without refilling, then when getting sparse, pull charred material toward cross-hole, and fill in behind it.

And re that big grin, one of the principles of survival, of course, is we keep it simple, and use what-ever's at hand - unless we're practicing. Thanks for the rib. ;-)

incognito
2008-08-06, 18:21
Oh, I do (and teach) that too. Do you know about tinder cans? (known as "the quickest way from ember to flame." Take virtually any can, but a little V-8 can is great. Remove the top with a side-of-seal-opener so it can be re-seated, cut a cross in the side of the can, and attach a piece of wood or other hot-can-holder to the bottom. Bend in the four corners formed by the cross (to where you can get your finger back out). Then pack the can with dry pine needles or dry grass or dry mugwort leaves. Pre-char if pine-needles or grass, (or poke in a pinch of mugwort, charcloth, or charcoal). Get an ember from any of a multitude of methods (in either charcloth or charcoal made from rotten hard-wood - like oak) and put it in the cross hole. Be sure the lid is off, then blow the ember into a flame. When conditions are right, one long blow produces flame out top of can like a blow-torch, which can be directed at whatever you want to light. With the Bush Buddy or Can-Can Bush Buddy, I hold the packed stove almost upside down, with the tinder-can under it shooting up. With the Can Bush Buddy (the recent simpler design) just blow it into a bottom hole. Once stove is lit, put lid back onto tinder-can, and even though the cross-hole is still open, with no air-movement the smudge will soon extinguish. Can be used several times without refilling, then when getting sparse, pull charred material toward cross-hole, and fill in behind it.

And re that big grin, one of the principles of survival, of course, is we keep it simple, and use what-ever's at hand - unless we're practicing. Thanks for the rib. ;-)

Was not aware of the Tinder Cans. I've been away from the Survival Scene for awhile. Spent a couple of years on Survival.com "Hood Woods" Hoodlum Forum. Picked up a thing or two there. The most important thing learned was you need to carry with you at all times the means to start a fire in the worst of conditions.

My inspiration came from reading an article By Dr. André F. Bourbeau :

Fire and Rain
by
Dr. André F. Bourbeau

Quote:
In my opinion, knowing how to start a fire and how to keep it going in a drenching downpour is one of the absolutely essential survival skills. No one is going to make ME believe that I can go out there in freezing rain at about 0 degrees Celsius, after it's been raining for days, pile up some half frozen and sogging wet debris for hours to make a debris hut, crawl in with non-waterproof clothes on, and not fall victim to hypothermia in very short order. Been there, done it - just doesn't work! I speak from experience. I've slept out with no gear whatsoever in that precise kind of weather, at the very least, 100 times in the past 25 years.
When the going gets rough, and days of freezing rain, sometimes followed by -35 degrees is just about as rough as it gets, the only thing that will save your life is fire. Noted survival expert, Tom Elpel, just came back from a 4 day walkabout. How did he spend each night? By a fire. I do the same, and any experienced outdoorsman will also do the same.
Fire, fire, fire - you've got to become a pyromaniac. It's the only way to survive! Freezing rain is worse than deep cold, because you can't even build a snow cave or snow shelter...
If there's material for a debris hut, that means there are trees, and if there are trees, there is firewood, and if there is firewood, there is fire. And if there are no trees, and everything is soaking wet and freezing cold, and you have no rain gear or shelter, sorry folks, but your luck has just run out.
Just like bough beds - make me laugh! Just try lying on one of those soggy soaking wet beds made from dripping evergreen branches. You won't last 2 hours in really cold weather, I guarantee it.
So, if you want to survive, learn how to make a fire in the rain. Sorry, that just can't be learned by reading, you have to practice. Why practice when it's nice out? You don't need a fire then! It's when it's miserable and soggy and soaking wet and all your clothes are drenched that you need a nice big bright beautiful fire to dry you out and keep you warm. Please practice this skill during the worst thunderstorms you can find, close to camp. THIS is one skill which WILL save your life- even without shelter.
Out of 32 students who sign up for my bachelor's degree in outdoor adventure pursuits in their first year at the University of Quebec, on average, only 1 or 2 can successfully start a fire in the rain - and they all have experience. Imagine beginners... No wonder so many people die from hypothermia.
The problem is that everyone has learned to make a fire by picking out small twigs from conifers, then putting them on the fire one by one, then bigger ones, then bigger ones still - as if size of wood and leaving enough air were the only factors to consider when making fire. It isn't as simple as that. There is a lot more to this skill than meets the eye.
Of all the skills I teach, starting fire in the worst downpours (at least with matches, BIC lighters and a magnesium match) is on the very top of my list of priorities. I cannot EVER stress this enough. If you want to survive, LEARN THIS SKILL!
Best wishes for dry weather in the meantime.

Read entire comentary here http://www.equipped.org/andre.htm

I luv the wild also!!!!!!

LuvTheWild
2008-08-06, 23:54
Incognito wrote: "The most important thing learned was you need to carry with you at all times the means to start a fire in the worst of conditions."

Thanks Incognito, for the reminder to practice starting fires in worst conditions. There are a bunch of order-able commercial burn-in-the-rain tinders, and we can make our own from common things around the house. An old stand-by is an egg carton with wicking like saw-dust or cotton balls in the holes with melted paraffin, bees wax, or tallow poured over it. By having the wax be fairly hot when poured, it will soak in nicely, water-proofing the wicking and carton. Pieces can then be cut or torn off as needed. A tightly rolled and tied newspaper could be soaked with hot wax, then chopped into small pieces as needed. I ordered a pound of magnesium "powder," but found the particle size is too large to catch with a sparker. However, a little pile of magnesium shavings from the starter will ignite a bigger pile of the powder, which can be carried, for instance, in a film canister. [I've wondered about running it through a coffee grinder or even a VitaMix. It might be soft enough to make a fine powder.] I've also played with thermite, which is made by mixing powdered iron oxide with powdered aluminum, 8:3 by weight, or about 50-50 by volume. It can be ignited with the magnesium powder and shavings. The burn is hot enough that it's used to weld railroad tracks together, or if mixed into clay or silly putty, it can be used to slice steel beams (thermate is even better). A flower-pot of thermite will feed the molten liquid out the hole in the bottom, and if on a car hood for instance, it will melt straight through the hood and motor, and show up on the ground. However, I think it's of marginal value for starting wood fires, because its whole burn occurs in a concentrated spot in a very short time, so its tremendous heat is hard to transfer into the wood. That's why the long-burning waterproof tinders are better, even though they're nowhere near as hot. I like carrying a waterproof container (like a film canister) of cotton (like out of pill bottles), because a sparker lights it directly into a flame, which can then be used to light waterproof tinders. Vaseline soaked into the cotton waterproofs it, can still be lit with a ferrocerium sparker, and will burn quite a while in light rain.

incognito
2008-08-07, 12:05
I ordered a pound of magnesium "powder," but found the particle size is too large to catch with a sparker. However, a little pile of magnesium shavings from the starter will ignite a bigger pile of the powder,

As you already know, magnesium is the best fire starter you can have for starting a fire under the worst weather conditions. Rain will enhance the burning of it. A tablespoon full is required as a good amount to have to start a fire under max adverse conditions. If anyone wants a dose of reality, try shaving off a tablespoon full of it off a Coglands Ferrocerium rod. It's really really difficult, you wouldn't be able to do it in the pouring rain. Doit at home and put in a ziplock bag and heat seal it.

This is my "Ultimate Firestarter" I carry it on my keyring. The striker for it is a stainless steel single edge rasor blade that I keep in my wallet. Also in my wallet, I keep 1 tablespoon of magnesium shavings that are hermeticaly sealed in a poly film. Flattened out, it is as thick as two credit cards and is dimensionaly the same size as a credit card and weighs the same as a credit card.

Here is a photo of my "Ultimate Firestarter" it may ultimately help save my life. I have it with me always(there are ecceptions ) The one you see on my key ring has started countless fires and has served me well for three years. I replaced it today with one of the new ones shown in the photo. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/lifesaver004.jpg


video of me using the mini ferro rod on my key chain http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dos06c03p34

Another video using a coglands ferro rod and the little file I keep on my keychain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdW8WBY_uhY

Using ferro rod with jute twine http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDBBtUIVM5s

Note: the cotton balls and jute twine are without petroleum jelly. Sorry to have gotten off-topic, admin can delete at will =)

kmat
2008-08-07, 13:22
LuvTheWild,
Thanks for the info. I will pick up the issue soon. I have been experimenting with similar stoves since I read a post by Sgt Rock. It has been fun as well as disappointing. Thanks again and I look forward to hearing from you on other topics as well in the future.
kmat

LuvTheWild
2008-08-07, 18:51
Hey Incognito, nice videos. I don't see the "little file" on your key chain. Do you get the razor blade in your wallet through airport security these days? I have a little key-shaped multi-tool that unfolds into a decent knife that, as part of my key-chain, goes right through ap security. It was a gift, so I don't know where they're available. Where do you get the little ferro rods?

incognito
2008-08-08, 18:13
Hey Incognito, nice videos. I don't see the "little file" on your key chain. Do you get the razor blade in your wallet through airport security these days? I have a little key-shaped multi-tool that unfolds into a decent knife that, as part of my key-chain, goes right through ap security. It was a gift, so I don't know where they're available. Where do you get the little ferro rods?


I've not attempted ap security. Have not flown since having the blade in my wallet. I have made it through county court house security systems, they look the same as ap's.

The little ferro rods are purchased at hardware stores and welder supply companies. They are replacement flints for the torch starters.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/th_tool092.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/sub%20one/tool092.jpg)with a red cap on the end of it attached to my key chain. The smooth side is showing.

I have a small website that shows how to make the fire starter (http://www.bplite.com/viewtopic.php?f=51&t=63)and also some other fire starting info.

LuvTheWild
2008-08-08, 18:59
Aha! So Cool, thanks for revealing your source - the little shelf holders looked somehow familiar, but out of context I didn't recognize them. Well done. Next trip to Home Depot. I see you're also onto cotton mops. I have a quarter inch brass sleeve that nicely holds a twisted then doubled mop-strand. I generally pull out enough to fluff up, so it will flame from a spark, then snuff it by pulling it back into the tube.

fblc
2008-09-05, 10:14
Hello,

Do you think that double wall stove like bushbuddy works as well as single wall like your ?

Thanks
Fab