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UK_Ian
2008-08-17, 08:47
Hello again my colonial brethren. My question now is Tea. That fine British essential. Is the USA like most of Europe and class tea as that herbal, lemon, green, earl grey beverage or do you have Classic tea bags for brewing with milk and loads of sugar? If the latter do you have the classic (PG Tips, Tetley to name some UK Brands) teabags or shall I risk 20 years in Guantanamo Bay for smuggling teabas into the US? Your advise is welcome as always.

Lone Wolf
2008-08-17, 08:56
men don't drink tea here

UK_Ian
2008-08-17, 09:33
I suppose you 'men' carry a 6 pack of 'Bud' :beer:

Lone Wolf
2008-08-17, 10:09
I suppose you 'men' carry a 6 pack of 'Bud' :beer:

hell no. Busch Light

Rosaleen
2008-08-17, 10:21
Baloney!

I know plenty of "real men" who drink tea!

If you are fussy about tea, as I would anticipate from your nationality and question, then bring some. Yes, we have Lipton and Tetley, but going by reports of others, the tea here is not the same as in GB. Now,it could be the water, but my mother, for one, says the tea is much better, as are the scones. (In that case,the flour is different.)

Enjoy your visit!

Rosaleen

Greentick
2008-08-17, 10:40
Resistance is futile. Start drinking coffee now...

Frolicking Dino
2008-08-17, 11:00
Be forewarned that if you order tea in a southern USA restaurant, it will come in a glass with ice and will be sweetened with sugar and a lemon slice will be attached to the rim. You must order 'hot tea' to get what you normally drink and you will have to tell them to bring cream as tea here is not normally served with cream or milk.

sailingsoul
2008-08-17, 11:01
men don't drink tea here For the most part that's true. I grew up drinking tea. While camping it's my choice, regular, that's with milk (powered) and 2 sugars. In an American size coffee mug, not some sissy tea cup so small there is no place to wrap your pinky. I would say, Tetley and Lipton are available everywhere. No need to import but in your checked bags is cheap insurance, weight being nothing. That way your good to go as soon as you clear the airport. That and a British passport should get you past security quickly. :wink:
"I suppose you 'men' carry a 6 pack of 'Bud' " Only kids bring beer camping. They're still foolish enough to carry all that water. Men bring booze or tea, "get'er done" as our Red Necks say. SS :captain:

Rifleman
2008-08-17, 11:34
I've tried tea--many different types. You know, for all the supposed health benefits. It's kind of weak--even when using two bags instead of one. Compared to coffee, it's a disappointment.
R.

JAK
2008-08-17, 18:12
I've tried tea--many different types. You know, for all the supposed health benefits. It's kind of weak--even when using two bags instead of one. Compared to coffee, it's a disappointment.
R.It's true that tea is not as chewy as coffee, but it can be just as strong, depending on the tea, and there is more variety in terms of what sort of a lift or buzz you want out of it. When I am looking for chewy tea I have something in a black tea with cloves and add lots of milk and some honey, and maybe some dirt and sticks. Coffee comes in a variety of tastes, but only one kind of buzz and lift it would seem. With tea, there is that, plus a whole bunch of other subtle and not so subtle shit, I think.

In Canada we make a big deal of our Red Rose, but locally we have a brand of Orange Pekoe called King Cole which is a great tea. We are also very fortunate to have a tea shop in town here which carries some more unusual teas, like Russian Caravan tea, and stuff like that. You will find that in the United States also if you look. Atlantic Canadians are big tea drinkers. We like our coffee also, but traditionally we are among the few North Americans that drink more tea than coffee, as a region. Might be changing, but even Tim Hortons has introduced steeped tea for there coffee and donut shops in Atlantic Canada.

Jim Henderson
2008-08-18, 11:52
Yeah, the usual store brands are Lipton and Tetley, I like them but don't know how authentic they are. There are also some real teas from some of the smaller tea vendors like Bigelow, Celestial Sky, Stash etc. But the smaller vendors also sell a LOT of herbal/floral/fruity concoctions so read the label carefully.

The chain stores also have house brands too.

If you can find an "ethnic" store, usually Indian or Persian, you can find several foreign brands, but most of those are loose leaf.

By the way, most supermarkets will have a large selection(50? Hundred? types, 4 or 5 brands) of teas so it won't be hard to find.

Good Luck,

Jim Henderson

mclmm
2008-08-18, 12:13
Be forewarned that if you order tea in a southern USA restaurant, it will come in a glass with ice and will be sweetened with sugar and a lemon slice will be attached to the rim. You must order 'hot tea' to get what you normally drink and you will have to tell them to bring cream as tea here is not normally served with cream or milk.

Heathens.:biggrin:

As for real men not drinking tea... we all know that real men don't drink coffee, they drink 12 hours cold, unsweetened, green tea out of a muddy footprint on the trail. It's full of antioxidants you know.

Over here we get tetley, lipton, twinings and others in many different flavours such as english breakfast, earl grey, irish breakfast, darjeeling, etc. We have many cultured tea drinkers in Australia who like nothing better than sitting down for a devonshire tea of earl grey and scones with jam and cream while dreaming of the Mother Country with a slightly quivering lower lip and a small tear in the corner of their eye.

But the point is moot for me. I'm a coffee man - it's gotta be black and thick enough to stand the spoon up with a pinch of salt thrown in.

Jim Henderson
2008-08-18, 12:20
BTW, we also sell Sweetened Condensed milk which is what my Indian friends tell me is what they use in tea. Very rich and SWEET. Usually Bordens or Carnation and a store brand.

It is usually sold in the baking section.

Jim Henderson

UK_Ian
2008-08-19, 10:07
Many Thanks for you replies. I will now become an international tea smuggler.

On the subject of tea and for the uneducated among us:

1. Use tea from India or Ceylon (Sri Lanka), not China
2. Use a teapot, preferably ceramic
3. The teapot should be warm.
4. Tea should be strong - six spoons of leaves per 1 litre
5. Let the leaves move around the pot - no bags or strainers
6. Take the pot to the boiling kettle
7. Stir or shake the pot
8. Drink out of a tall, mug-shaped tea cup
9. Don't add creamy milk
10. Add milk to the tea, not vice versa
11. No sugar!

CaSteve
2008-08-20, 02:45
Try Yerba Mate.

Welcome to the New World ;-)

Lone Wolf
2008-08-20, 06:38
this is the best http://www.redrosetea.com/history.aspx

Wise Old Owl
2008-09-05, 23:12
Oh man you don't have to smuggle - there is plenty on the supermarket shelves and some of it is loose & quite good. But Nobody drinks it!

On a side note Land 0 Lakes makes Mini Moo's that's milk in individual micro cups for tea that does not require refrigeration and is perfect per cup.


Yes I am an old British subject.

smudge
2008-09-06, 03:47
I know on the west coast there is a store called World Market which carries Typhoo, Brithish Tetley's and PG Tips(In the pyramid pouch!)... Some Safeway/Vons(Also West Coast) carry Typhoo... Not sure but if you get into some top end Grocery stores in the East you'll probably find some real tea...


(Three years stationed in Newquay, Cornwall in case you're wondering...:D)

atraildreamer
2008-09-10, 15:59
Baloney!

I know plenty of "real men" who drink tea!

If you are fussy about tea, as I would anticipate from your nationality and question, then bring some. Yes, we have Lipton and Tetley, but going by reports of others, the tea here is not the same as in GB. Now,it could be the water, but my mother, for one, says the tea is much better, as are the scones. (In that case,the flour is different.)

Enjoy your visit!

Rosaleen

:argh:

I love a good cup of well-prepared coffee, but I often order tea when I go to the local Dunkin' Donuts, Honeydew, Mickey D's, whatever. These companies spend millions to advertise their product(s) only to have some undermotivated employee :albertein ruin the brew by not keeping the equipment clean! I have seen one person dump out most of a pot of coffee, leaving about a 1/2 inch of old brew in the bottom of the pot and starting a new brew into a dirty pot with old product still in it! :afraid: Others simply brew it too strong. I live in a state (RI) where there are several hundred major chain coffee outlets and I can only name 3 places where the coffee is consistently good. To add insult to injury, they expect you to throw something into the "TIP CUP".

At least with a cup of tea, all they have to do is just put a teabag into hot water (sans a dirty pot) (but they can screw that up too{another topic for another time})and I control the strength of the brew.

Stick to your tea my English friend, or stop by for a :beer: :biggrin:

Wise Old Owl
2008-09-13, 14:08
:argh:

I can only name 3 places where the coffee is consistently good. To add insult to injury, they expect you to throw something into the "TIP CUP".

At least with a cup of tea, all they have to do is just put a teabag into hot water (sans a dirty pot) (but they can screw that up too{another topic for another time})and I control the strength of the brew.

Stick to your tea my English friend, or stop by for a :beer: :biggrin:

I just want to share something with all about the tip cup. I work in the security industry and service many small business across three states. Two things are going on here that you might not know about.

1. You as an American can get a cup of Java or Tea of reasonable quality anywhere. If you so choose you can spend an extra buck for real cream and fancy sugars & syrups or have a "premium" bean. Your "freedoms" include not paying the extra buck and making it at home. Retailers such as Starbuck's know that - thats their business. So how do they consistently do well - here is the secret. Location, Location, Location. Starbuck is willing & "able" to pay for the highest priced leased locations on every high traffic corner imaginable. Their secret is to offer more locations than McDonald's or Dun-kin to get you to come in and have a mocha or ginseng tea. The true winner is the land owner or leasing company. That is what truly makes the coffee or tea expensive.

2. That kid behind the counter isn't making squat for the long hours pouring your java & steaming it to your satisfaction. Hence the tip jar. If you can afford tossing some change in there, it your "right" to do so. If you can't, don't concern yourself, you are not expected to do anything. - I am always stunned at the amount of coin in the boxes at the counter for McDonald's charity, isn't this a great country?

At Dreamer - this is not, I repeat not, a personal attack towards you, I have heard a lot of people with the same sentiment. - This post was simply to be informative and to open everyone's eyes to look at this differently.

JewDuh
2008-09-14, 15:29
To my british friend(s) I have to say that I can offer very little advice when it comes to finding the kind of teas that you are familiar with here in the US. My taste for tea has been skewed in 3 ways. 1. Growing up in rurral Ohio my mother constantly had a jar of sun tea brewing during the sping and summer. 2. After being stationed in Virginia I fell in love with "Souther Style" sweet tea. and 3. after being stationed in Okinawa Japan for a year I decided that if I'm gonna drink hot tea it's going to be an asian tea (Normally a green tea)

There is an old Chinese proverb that says, When life is good you don't care how much the tea cost (OK so I got that from a chinese movie, but it sounds like a proverb) I have found tea that I found good and tasty at a suprising number of places. Though I know I have learned to brew it much better than any coffee house I've run across

Now about the tip jar!
My cousin works at a starburks, and I know how many long hours she is there, and how rude most people are to her (Just think how rude people are most times, and add in how much worse people are before they have had their first cup of coffee) and, even though I dont make great (or even good) money, I have decided that if I am going to a coffee house the tip is part of the price. So I agree with you Mark

On the other hand I normally get lousy service, and I do agree with dreamer that paying a tip for terrible service on a product that is already over priced does add an insult to it. The tip used to be a reward for good service, but now it is so often used as a weapon, or blackmail... it is honestly a great injustice.

A general tip to anyone reading
The best cup of coffee that you will ever have can be done right at home. Buy fresh roasted whole beans (A 1lb/.5Kg bag cost about as moch as a cup of starbucks coffee)"Grind" it in your blender, or just smash the beans with something heavy (hammer)Then put a couple scoops in your camping perculator (If you dont have one $5 at walmart)add water, and heat slowly on a stove top or you will scorch it. Tada! GREAT COFFEE (It may take just a little practice)

KLeth
2008-09-15, 07:59
He he - I have not been able to get neither a proper cup of tea nor coffee in the US the times I went over there.:bandit:
Starbucks is drinkable . . . . But not that much different from tea!:ahhhhh:

To make tasty coffee, forget the coffemachine :coffee:
1 coffee/java press my preference is the Bodum Colombia.
1 litre of hot - NOT boiling water app. 96celcius.
4 tablesppons of extra roasted ground coffee, best if ground from beans just before use. It must not contain roasted grain nor chicory.
Dump ground coffee into press, let boiling water settle and gently pour water into ground coffee, stir gently and apply lid with press elevated.
Wait 4-10 minutes before pressing.
Kill the cow and cut to steaks, you will not be needing milk.
Serve in mug without sugar.

Decent coffeee can be made using the same amount of water and ground coffee either by dumping coffee into boiling water or by using an old fashioned perculator (add two extra tablespoons of ground coffee for taste).

Instant "coffee" is a nice drink on hikes and we praise it by calling it "coffee" but we never touch it at home.

Espresso is nice but who got the great idea to spoil it with essence of cow ? Or sugar ? Or even worse syrup with flavors?
Coffe can be spiced with various spirits but then it is a drink and not coffee.

atraildreamer
2008-09-15, 13:26
I just want to share something with all about the tip cup. I work in the security industry and service many small business across three states. Two things are going on here that you might not know about.

1. You as an American can get a cup of Java or Tea of reasonable quality anywhere. If you so choose you can spend an extra buck for real cream and fancy sugars & syrups or have a "premium" bean. Your "freedoms" include not paying the extra buck and making it at home. Retailers such as Starbuck's know that - thats their business. So how do they consistently do well - here is the secret. Location, Location, Location. Starbuck is willing & "able" to pay for the highest priced leased locations on every high traffic corner imaginable. Their secret is to offer more locations than McDonald's or Dun-kin to get you to come in and have a mocha or ginseng tea. The true winner is the land owner or leasing company. That is what truly makes the coffee or tea expensive.

2. That kid behind the counter isn't making squat for the long hours pouring your java & steaming it to your satisfaction. Hence the tip jar. If you can afford tossing some change in there, it your "right" to do so. If you can't, don't concern yourself, you are not expected to do anything. - I am always stunned at the amount of coin in the boxes at the counter for McDonald's charity, isn't this a great country?

At Dreamer - this is not, I repeat not, a personal attack towards you, I have heard a lot of people with the same sentiment. - This post was simply to be informative and to open everyone's eyes to look at this differently.

Don't worry...I have a thick skin, and these forums can get pretty wild at times, but we all can still be friends!
My gripe is not with the price, although I avoid Starbucks (went there once, in 1995, and never returned- overrated, overly strong and definitely overpriced). A couple of bucks for a good cup of coffee is reasonable IMHO. It is the lack of consistent quality control. Some employees care, others don't give a damn! I like to tip, and generously, for good service and good product, but a cup of bitter brew from a dirty pot :ahhhhh: really riles me!

Jack
2008-09-15, 22:14
I'm with Nessmuk - Tea's the thing for the trail.

Bought some Twinings Gunpowder Green Tea in 100g
tins for about $3 per, awhile back. Good stuff. Think
the place was called Bay Area Importers, but the link
no longer works.

Red Rose is good too.

Jack

Wise Old Owl
2008-11-03, 00:42
I'm with Nessmuk - Tea's the thing for the trail.

Bought some Twinings Gunpowder Green Tea in 100g
tins for about $3 per, awhile back. Good stuff. Think
the place was called Bay Area Importers, but the link
no longer works.

Red Rose is good too.

Jack

Be careful GP tea is taken in small amounts!

Rosaleen
2008-11-03, 07:39
My mother seemed to prefer Tetley or Lipton: I've forgotten. My aunt insisted on Red Rose as the best tea. I seem to recall their mother had Lipton in the shelf.

Call me a Philistine: I don't care. <w> I drink any of the above, or store house brands, herbals, you name it. I do have a fondness for peppermint helbals and Constant Comment.

Rosaleen

JAK
2008-11-06, 09:40
I've been drink alot of peppermint lately myself. It's a nice diet drink after brushing my teeth and using mouthwash I can go longer without eating if I just drink peppermint tea because I want to keep my teeth clean longer and that helps me diet. You can get a similar tea from the inner bark of most birch, but not so much paper birch. It's a wintergreen flavour. In fact, it is exactly the same stuff as the wintergreen flavour.

erin
2008-11-06, 22:38
I was a total lipton drinker, still am. I grew up with tea with a fresh mint sprig shoved in the the glass from our yard and a mound of sugar. But I went to a tea house in Chinatown a few weeks ago with a tea snob friend and the tea was excellent. I tried them all, white teas, green teas. rose teas, and they were wonderful. There are very good teas available, loose, at many coffe houses. Just check around.

Wise Old Owl
2008-11-06, 23:24
Ahh the choices!

sheepdog
2008-11-07, 10:20
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BitlXcKAyBw
Perhaps this could help you with your tea smuggling.

Jack
2008-11-07, 23:31
> Be careful GP tea is taken in small amounts!

How come?

:bandit: