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Geo.
2008-11-14, 23:54
Just got back from a trip to the UK. Did a 'west coast to east coast' hike through their Lake District and moors and thought some of the pic's could be of interest to anyone thinking of checking the place out.

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/lakedist.jpg
Some neat vistas through the Lake District

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/lake3.jpg
Heading up Helvellyn, getting good back views.

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/lake4.jpg
Some nice scenery

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/lake_dist1C.jpg
Heading for the tops again

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Dropping down to 'Striding Edge' ridge from Helveyllyn

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/stridtarn.jpg
Ridge with another tarn (mountain lake) to right.

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/moorsC.jpg
Onto the moors and some level going at last. Albeit boggy in places!

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Edge of Beck woods, shelter carved out of a solid boulder. Initials GC and the date 1790 carved above the entrance.

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Cheap accomodation! Even a wall bench inside carved out of the rock

Here's a few pic's for you naval types. After the hike visited Portsmouth & Greenwich. Here's HMS Victory, formerly Nelson's flagship that fought at the battle of Trafalgar and also the oldest warship still in commission. Today she's the flagship of the Second Sea Lord, Commander in Chief of the Royal Navy's Home Command.

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/victoryC.jpg
HMS Victory. Nelson's flagship. Magnificent.


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The old and the new (and I ain't just talkin' cannons!) HMS Illustrious, Invincible class carrier in the stream off Greenwich

http://angelfire.com/trek/nz_usa/nelson.jpg
Bit of nostalgia at HMS Nelson naval barracks. Last time I stood alongside this chap, I had a lot more hair and (thought) I knew a lot more. ;)
Great trip, and besides the hiking also recommended for the places of historical interest.

jnetx
2008-11-15, 23:08
...it's been almost 30 years since I hike the coast to coast. If I have pictures from back then they are long buried in a box somewhere. I loved you pictures. I've been saying for several years that I'd have to rehike that one some day, maybe I'll have to figure it in to next year's UK.

Thanks again for sharing

CaSteve
2008-11-16, 03:08
How long did the hike take to complete?

jnetx
2008-11-16, 10:04
How long did the hike take to complete?

My trip was way to many years ago to recall details, but as I recall it was a couple of weeks. The trail is about 200 miles, so that's not high mileage, but there special considerations on most UK hikes. There are few places to camp so most people don't carry camping or cooking gear, but walk between two bed and breakfast establishments. Back then we (a group of 3 very proper :angel: boarding school girls) were able to talk most of the B&B owners into letting us camp in their gardens, so we did carry camping gear. I'm not sure how well that would go down these days. We also usually bought a sandwich lunch from the B&Bs and carried a stove to supplement the sandwiches with soups, and bought snacks in villages we passed through. Again, not sure how many small convenience store/post offices are still out there for supplies, nor if B&Bs would still sell sandwiches to anyone not staying, though I'm sure would do it for an overnight guest.

The trail wasn't contiguously blazed back then, just a connection of local walking paths and some connecting walks down quiet country back roads, but most walking paths in the UK are very well trodden and with basic maps and a guide book to tell you when to get off the roads or change paths it was very easy to stay on trail.

It is a nice walk though, I'd say medium to strenuous in some places, though it's all actual walking and no "hang on with your hands" stuff like the northern polrtions of the AT. It's very open countryside and some great views, even when it's pouring with rain, which it does quite frequently.

I'm sure the OP has much better current data.

Geo.
2008-11-17, 05:51
Hi CaSteve,
The hike is about 200 miles. I finished around noon on the 12th day.
I carried a tent, bag etc., and used them most nights. Stayed at a B&B two nights and a hostel on one night. I didn't carry much in the way of food, because as jnetx said, in the UK you can generally come across somewhere during the day or at the end of a day to get something to eat. Usually got food (and beer) in a country pub as the day's travel would get you from village to village or to a remote pub as a rule. The UK is very populated, and even though there are 'untouched' areas, you are never far from a road (as the crow flies) I believe that the furthest you can get from a road of some description in the entire UK is 7 miles - and that is a spot on the side of a Scottish hillside in the highlands. Having said that, weather can be a deciding factor as far as safety goes for some areas, as they can be very exposed and it pays to carry the necessary clothing/gear. I took a gps with me, and was glad of it on two occasions whilst on the tops in the Lake district. Cloud had cut visibility right down, and the gps did its job in pinpointing my position on the map, allowing me to get a compass bearing to head off on. Probably wouldn't be too much of a problem if you were quite familiar with the territory.
The Coast to Coast trail is not blazed as such, as it's not recognised as a national trail. There was little or no C2C marking through the Lake district or most of the moors, but there are generally obvious signs of a worn trail - the problem there though, can be making sure that it's the trail you want. Beside strip maps, I carried a Coast to Coast guide book by a chap called Henry Stedman that was excellent in indicating 'landmarks' where turnings/trail crossings and rights of way across farmlands could be sorted out and where you could get food etc.
There is the option of a 'high' route or a low route in parts through the Lake District. The high route obviously gives the better views, but is not recommended if the weather is crap. I was lucky in that the weather let me decide to take the higher sections when the time came. The walking was mostly 'upright' with just a bit of easy scrambling up and down a few parts of the higher sections, but there were a couple of strenuous ascents that got the lungs working, especially with a full pack. The moors were easy going, though a few spots had you sinking to knee level in bog. :dong:
A lot of folk plan the route by pre booking into B&B's or having gear shuttled ahead. That way you can just carry a day pack. I didn't do that, mainly because of cost but also because I don't like being tied to a schedule and also because I like to carry my tent etc., in case of any emergency injury or hold up.
Overall, the route is 'demanding' rather than difficult and recommended if you want to do a couple of weeks hiking in the UK with a chance of seeing some of its better scenery.

dixicritter
2008-11-17, 18:34
Awesome pics Geo. Thanks for sharing! :)

Bulldawg
2008-11-17, 19:12
That looks like an awesome trip!!

Rick
2008-11-17, 21:59
Great Pics. I've been up the Lower Man a few times via Thirlmere, as well Blencathra & Skiddaw via Threlkeld and also via Sharp Edge. Striding Edge is on my list one of these days (if Striding is anything like sharp, I'll sport an extra set of boxers in my pack.)
My father grew up about 10 miles away near Wigton and his sisters still live there, so we have a nice basecamp every few years when we go... Though I always have to put time on on the farm...

Last year we were section hiking part of the wall (each trip a different section) and came upon some Californians who were doing the C to C in full Roman Garb. It was actually pretty cool. We ran into them several days in a row.

Nothing, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING beats watching the RAF come screaming through flying Nap of the Earth (250'-500') in Hawks, Tornado's and some really cool delta wing jets (triangle). It is always the higlight of my day.
The sounds of Freedom Baby... Freedom!!!!!

Geo.
2008-11-18, 18:09
Nothing, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING beats watching the RAF come screaming through flying Nap of the Earth (250'-500') in Hawks, Tornado's and some really cool delta wing jets (triangle). It is always the higlight of my day.
The sounds of Freedom Baby... Freedom!!!!!

Ain't that the truth! Couple of times they had me scrambling for my camera but were on me and gone - afterburners a lot faster that my reflexes! Awesome.

Rick
2008-11-18, 19:45
I am always really impressed (and a little jealous) when someone can take the time to take such nice photos. I just don't have the patience or willing to create art. Usually it is part of a head, a bit of a mountain and my finger over the lense.
As I look at them again, they are all stunning and frameworthy. How many pixels is your camera?

Skidsteer
2008-11-18, 20:22
Thanks for the report Geo. Very nice pics.

Superman
2008-11-18, 21:32
I had intended to do that hike after the AT. Then I found out that Winter would be quarantined for 6 months, which was not acceptable. She's too old to hike any trail now. I still intend to do that hike...after Winter passes.

taildragger
2008-11-18, 22:54
I know have an excuse to visit england for something more than just history, beer, and Whiskey.

Awesome pics

JAK
2008-11-19, 02:27
Great pics. Thanks for the inspiration.

Geo.
2008-11-19, 04:24
I am always really impressed (and a little jealous) when someone can take the time to take such nice photos. I just don't have the patience or willing to create art. Usually it is part of a head, a bit of a mountain and my finger over the lense.
As I look at them again, they are all stunning and frameworthy. How many pixels is your camera?

I've got a 4 megapix Olympus Mju. Had it for about five years now. It was the only (lower price range) digital that was around that was water resistant and compact. Take it with me on all my hikes, damp conditions, rain, dropping it etc., and it's still going well. I'm pretty tough on my gear. Don't do anything special with my pic's, just point and shoot what I see. Beauty of a digital camera is that you can fire off multiple shots and you usually end up with something that's worthwhile!
Also got an Advantix conventional film camera that takes panorama shots. Very light, small, not as robust, but again, it's just point and shoot. (the first pic in the post was taken with that, the dig took the others) The Olympus will also take panoramic shots, but it's a bit more involved having to 'stitch' two or more shots together and I can't be hassled messing with it.