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Frolicking Dino
2008-11-19, 16:28
What cookset do you use when cooking for more than two? I use the Antigravity Gear 2L non-stick aluminum pot (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=MK2QNS) with a cozy (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=AGCZAG2Q) and Neoprene cover (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=AGNEOC2Q&cat=32) to feed two hungry Dinos. However, it appears the Dinos will be having considerable company on the trails soon - several of the grandkids and one of the great-grandkids (actually several of them want to go - only one is old enough for me to feel safe taking him).

sheepdog
2008-11-19, 16:38
One jetboil. It is quick and I boil as many cups as I need one after the other. I don't cook on the trail I just boil water.

taildragger
2008-11-19, 17:07
Anything that will work with an open fire.

I prefer to cook hobo style, just put your food and seasoning in some tin foil, throw onto coals, about 10 min later pick it up and eat

erin
2008-11-20, 00:39
Dino, we used a jet boil for three on the AT. For other hikes, we have hobo style cooked as Traildragger suggested. With kids, really do some "stick bread." Kids love it. I learned this at summer camp in Tennessee.
Take some Pillsbury biscuits or croissants, wrap one thinly around a green peeled stick or metal fork and roast over fire. Butter on top, or jelly. Kids can do these and love them. If they drop one in the fire, no big deal, just wrap another one and go again. Another great idea for kids is sommomores. Marshmellows on a stick, melted, betwen a graham cracker and slab of Hershey bar. Another kid campout treat.

Rosaleen
2008-11-20, 07:55
Dino-

The suggestions that you have so far seem pretty good, based on the limited info that you have already provided. We don't know how many children will accompany you per trip, or their ages.

If you do campfire cooking, it will take more time and the foods that come to mind are heavier and bulkier to carry. That makes base or car camping sound like the way to go. Foil packet dinners can be anything from raw ingredients to ones that are merely heated up. It might be fun for the kids to make their own, labeling with a marker, so that each gets exactly what he likes. Then, you just have to keep track of which is which on the coals. The first foil dinner that comes to mind is the one layered with onion, then carrot and potato slices, then a hamburger patty, more potato and carrot, and more onion. The onions on the outside protect the other ingredients from burning easily.

Refrigerated biscuits on sticks were mentioned. They can be wrapped around hot dogs and the whole thing cooked on a stick over coals. Onions or oranges can be cut in half, then hollowed out, and the "shells" filled with a food to be placed on or just above coals for cooking.

As far as a pot goes, 2 L is a good size already. I think I'd look at just using a faster stove, whether a larger alcohol stove (Think big beer cans.) or another fuel. You MIGHT want to consider a large coffee can for a pot, or a second aluminum pot, the same size or just enough smaller to nest into the one you have now. If you have to heat more water, so be it.

Lighter food options for a weekend-Precook and freeze some beef or turkey burger and some mixed vegetables. Allow to thaw in your packs as you hike. Toss measured amounts (packets made at home) into individual big cups of noodles. Wash out the cups and use them for the weekend. Another meal can be ramen noodles broken into these cups with more cooked and frozen hamburger. Add Italian seasoning and tomato paste from a squeeze tube or tomato powder-or your own dehydrated spaghetti sauce. Veggies that you could add: parsley, spinach, zucchini-chopped and slightly cooked, then frozen, maybe, or dehydrated. Obviously, the burger could also be frozen. Another version could be finely cut or grated cheese of your choice and a little butter instead of the tomato sauce. Tuna or chicken instead of the ground beef. Potatoes or instant rice instead of the noodles... You get the idea.

You may want to toss the cups by the end of the weekend and flush the cups with scalding water between meals. The tiny pores of the cups might hold onto food particles and grow bacteria. I've reused cups for short periods of time with no ill effects...

Good Luck!

Rosaleen

Frolicking Dino
2008-11-20, 09:06
Great suggestions - keep 'em coming.

I already take the little kids car camping. A few want to go backpacking with us. Most of my grandkids are are young adults - the youngest interested in backpacking is 16 yo. The only great-grandchild I would consider taking without a parent along to care for the child is 8 yo. I'm too old to chase a little one in the woods. As the others get older, I will start taking them.

Because everyone on these trips would be 'green' and I can't walk as far as I used to, we don't hike too far or really strenuous stretches much anymore. I normally don't hike with more than five or six in tow - plus me and He-Dino.

warraghiyagey
2008-11-20, 10:00
Anything that will work with an open fire.

I prefer to cook hobo style, just put your food and seasoning in some tin foil, throw onto coals, about 10 min later pick it up and eat

Damn that's badass. Dude eats foil. :adore:

Frolicking Dino
2008-11-20, 10:38
:::: Dino seen wrapping Warraghy in tin foil and adding copious amount of onions, garlic and other spices ::::

AMPEX799
2008-11-20, 10:47
What cookset do you use when cooking for more than two? I use the Antigravity Gear 2L non-stick aluminum pot (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=MK2QNS) with a cozy (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=AGCZAG2Q) and Neoprene cover (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=AGNEOC2Q&cat=32) to feed two hungry Dinos. However, it appears the Dinos will be having considerable company on the trails soon - several of the grandkids and one of the great-grandkids (actually several of them want to go - only one is old enough for me to feel safe taking him).

GSI Hard annodized cookset, outback oven, a Snowpeak Giga BF (bigburner) and a primus alpine micro. Lots of gear but then there's plenty of folks to carry it.

Frolicking Dino
2008-11-20, 11:20
GSI Hard annodized cookset,Are you suggesting the Bugaboo set (http://www.altrec.com/gsi/bugaboo-aluminum-cookset-7-pc) or another set?

I had forgotten I have an old Whisperlite International (http://www.altrec.com/mountain-safety-research/whisperlite-international-stove) and a couple of 22 oz bottles (http://www.altrec.com/mountain-safety-research/fuel-bottle). Imagine that would work for any cooking not done on a fire. I'm pretty good with doing even conventional cooking over a cook fire -- I was backpacking before many of these newfangled stoves were around. I still have my first BP'ing stove - similar to this stove by Coleman
http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b47/lowcarbscoop/ColemanExponentFeather442.jpg

GGS
2008-11-20, 13:00
:::: Dino seen wrapping Warraghy in tin foil and adding copious amount of onions, garlic and other spices ::::

Make sure you roast him over the fire for a good long time too... :biggrin:

taildragger
2008-11-20, 14:55
Make sure you roast him over the fire for a good long time too... :biggrin:

Yeah, you don't want to get trichinosis, also, you've really gotta be careful with your seasoning since the warrghy is wild game, too much and you'll lose the natural taste, too little and the natural taste will be overwhelmingly gamey

sheepdog
2008-11-20, 15:04
Damn that's badass. Dude eats foil. :adore:

Real men eat their foil raw!!:bandit:

Two Speed
2008-11-20, 15:46
Yeah, you don't want to get trichinosis, also, you've really gotta be careful with your seasoning since the warrghy is wild game, too much and you'll lose the natural taste, too little and the natural taste will be overwhelmingly gameySeeing as we're talking about wargy I'd be more concerned about mad cow disease than trichinosis.

AMPEX799
2008-11-20, 15:51
Are you suggesting the Bugaboo set (http://www.altrec.com/gsi/bugaboo-aluminum-cookset-7-pc) or another set?

I had forgotten I have an old Whisperlite International (http://www.altrec.com/mountain-safety-research/whisperlite-international-stove) and a couple of 22 oz bottles (http://www.altrec.com/mountain-safety-research/fuel-bottle). Imagine that would work for any cooking not done on a fire. I'm pretty good with doing even conventional cooking over a cook fire -- I was backpacking before many of these newfangled stoves were around. I still have my first BP'ing stove - similar to this stove by Coleman
http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b47/lowcarbscoop/ColemanExponentFeather442.jpg
http://www.gsioutdoors.com/detail.aspx?s=6&p=50205&
Pick and choose from the hard annodized items as you see fit. I use some pieces almost daily in my home. It is virtually impossible to even get burnt cheese to stick, spreads heat very well, cleans with a paper towel. I take 2 burners because baking that pizza, or hot cinnamon buns ties up the main stove.

Frolicking Dino
2008-11-20, 17:07
..... taste will be overwhelmingly gameyI see you and Warraghy have met and become really good friends :D

Hooch
2008-11-20, 17:24
:::: Dino seen wrapping Warraghy in tin foil and adding copious amount of onions, garlic and other spices ::::I say we cut the Dino tail in chunks, add potatoes, onions, peppers, garlic, rosemary, tarragon, butter, salt and pepper and roast until done. :ahhhhh:

Frolicking Dino
2008-11-20, 17:30
OVEN HOOCH RUMP ROAST


Rub a 26 pound boneless rump roast with 8 teaspoons salt, 4 teaspoon dry mustard and 2 teaspoon each of garlic salt and pepper. If you wish, use unseasoned meat tenderizer according to directions on the package.Insert a meat thermometer into the center of the thickest part of the roast. Place on meat rack in a shallow baking pan.
Mix together: 8 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 4 c. dry red wine (or 4c. water) 8 tbsp. lemon juice
Brush meat with this basting sauce.
Roast in a moderately slow oven, 325 degrees, until the meat thermometer registers 130 degrees for rare meat or about 8 hours. Figure about 18 minutes per pound for rare meat. Baste with the wine sauce several times during roasting.
Let the meat stand at room temperature about 10 minutes to set the juices, then slice and serve. Serves a small army or 20 thru-hikers

Hooch
2008-11-20, 17:39
OVEN HOOCH RUMP ROAST


Rub a 26 pound boneless rump roast with 8 teaspoons salt, 4 teaspoon dry mustard and 2 teaspoon each of garlic salt and pepper. If you wish, use unseasoned meat tenderizer according to directions on the package.Insert a meat thermometer into the center of the thickest part of the roast. Place on meat rack in a shallow baking pan.
Mix together: 8 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 4 c. dry red wine (or 4c. water) 8 tbsp. lemon juice
Brush meat with this basting sauce.
Roast in a moderately slow oven, 325 degrees, until the meat thermometer registers 130 degrees for rare meat or about 8 hours. Figure about 18 minutes per pound for rare meat. Baste with the wine sauce several times during roasting.
Let the meat stand at room temperature about 10 minutes to set the juices, then slice and serve. Serves a small army or 20 thru-hikers



Touche'. :fight:

Saint Alfonzo
2008-12-09, 21:30
I don't care how you cook it, its going to give you GAS...