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Bster13
2008-12-01, 13:58
I have one of these:

http://i1.tinypic.com/6pqxegi.jpg

Will something like this insulate me better from the cold than a closed cell blue pad and 3/4 in. thermarest?

I hear differing stories....some say air insulates well...so with this thick coleman, the more the better, right? Others say, u need closed cell pads to insulate.

I'd much prefer the thick coleman for comfort, but if it's going to make me cold, then I'll pass. thx.

Frolicking Dino
2008-12-01, 14:17
This type mattress does not provide much insulation. If you are car camping, put the CCF mats under this mattress and have the best of both worlds.

Bster13
2008-12-01, 14:21
OK, so the consensus is air doesn't do much to insulate whether it is big coleman air mattresses or a thermarest or two?

taildragger
2008-12-01, 14:26
OK, so the consensus is air doesn't do much to insulate whether it is big coleman air mattresses or a thermarest or two?

Stale air is a good insulator, however, in a mattress that size, its likely that you will get convection currents, which makes air a poor insulator since it is helping to transfer the heat from you to the ground.

Thats why CCF pads insulate well, they trap air, but the pockets are so small that there is no convection

Frolicking Dino
2008-12-01, 14:34
OK, so the consensus is air doesn't do much to insulate whether it is big coleman air mattresses or a thermarest or two?Thermarest have foam inside that acts as an insulator. For comfort and warmth in a backpacking mattress, I recommend Big Agnes Insulated Air Core. (http://www.bigagnes.com/str_pads.php?bid=3)

Bster13
2008-12-01, 14:36
Hrmm..I currently have these two pads I was going to layer with for my winter camping (-20f to 32f possible temperatures):

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/eccStoreFront/stp/product_images/89145/m_89145_1.jpg

and a Thermarest Prolite 3 short.

Both are filled with air, but perhaps not enough for air currents to draw away heat?

If I should make the trek to walmart to grab some closed cell, I will, but I'd rather not. thx.

Bster13
2008-12-01, 14:39
Ah, just saw Dino's post. Both the full length insulmat and the prolite 3 short are of similar construction with baffles...I would think I'm good to go... :)

taildragger
2008-12-01, 14:44
Hrmm..I currently have these two pads I was going to layer with for my winter camping (-20f to 32f possible temperatures):

and a Thermarest Prolite 3 short.

Both are filled with air, but perhaps not enough for air currents to draw away heat?

If I should make the trek to walmart to grab some closed cell, I will, but I'd rather not. thx.

Look for a system with a high R value. You can add up the insulation resistances in series to find your total value. I'm not sure exactly what you'd want for total insulation, but at -20F, I'd make sure its a damned high R-value. If no one answers your question here, or on WB, then I'd ask the people at feathered friends, nwhikers.net or a mountaineering website where there might be more people with experience in extreme colds

Frolicking Dino
2008-12-01, 14:58
Thermarest proLite3 has R value of 2.3 and Insulmats (http://www.pacoutdoor.com/2008/index.cfm?action=family&familyID=1) come in various forms - everything from very light insulation to 4 season insulation. I would think the Thermarest plus a four season Insulmat would keep you warm at those temps, but I'm not sure about the lighter versions.

Bster13
2008-12-03, 11:04
Hrmm...these mats are slippery. Anyone have trouble getting them to stay together? I don't really wanna whip out the duct tape and then spend an hour cleaning the tape residue off the pads when I am done w/ the trip....

Frolicking Dino
2008-12-03, 16:49
I lashed them together with a strap the few times I did this.

Bster13
2008-12-03, 16:51
I was thinking of using that grippy stuff you use to line your drawers and cupboards in the kitchen in between each pad......we'll c!

MRH
2008-12-03, 18:06
I do alot of Winter camping and wanted something that is comfortable. I went all out and bought the Exped DownMat9 DLX. The stuff sack pumps it up... takes about 10 pumps. Yea,,, I know its 3lbs but after waking up the next morning its worth it. It has an r-value of 8 (-36 deg). very very comfy... best sleep on the trail I've ever had... just bought it this year so the coldest its been out is 22 deg. This is where I bought it due to Free Shipping.
http://www.summithut.com/products/downmat/

Bster13
2008-12-03, 18:09
MRH, I've had trouble finding a chart that equated r-value to temperature. Where did you find a chart that led you to believe an r-value of 8 is good down to -36 degrees? (F I assume)

MRH
2008-12-03, 18:18
Got the r-value from campmor... http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___12403
may or maynot be correct and got the temp rating from http://www.exped.com/exped/web/exped_homepage.nsf/b43HomePageE?openframeset
This is their list:
DownMat 7 Short
Size: 120x52 cm / 47x20“
Thickness: 7 cm / 2.8“
Weight: 595 g / 21 oz
Packsack 120 g / 4.2 oz
Packed: 18x15 cm / 7x6“
Fill Weight**: 130 g / 5 oz
Temperature: -24C / -11F


DownMat 7
Size: 178x52 cm / 70x20“
Thickness: 7 cm / 2.8“
Weight: 835 g / 29 oz
Packsack: 140 g / 5 oz
Packed: 19x15 cm / 7x6“
Fill Weight**: 170 g / 6 oz
Temperature: -24C / -11F



DownMat 7 DLX
Size: 193x65 cm / 76x26“
Thickness: 7 cm / 2.8“
Weight: 1050 g / 37 oz
Packsack 150 g / 5.3 oz
Packed: 30x15 cm / 12x6“
Fill Weight**: 220 g / 7.8 oz
Temperature: -24C / -11F



DownMat 9
Size: 178x52 cm / 70x20“
Thickness: 9 cm / 3.5“
Weight: 955 g / 34 oz
Packsack 170 g / 6 oz
Packed: 23x16 cm / 9x6“
Fill Weight**: 250 g / 9 oz
Temperature: -38C / -36F



DownMat 9 DLX
Size: 193x65 cm / 76x26“
Thickness: 9 cm / 3.5“
Weight: 1180 g / 42 oz
Packsack: 210 g / 7.4 oz
Packed: 28x18 cm / 11x7“
Fill Weight**: 320 g / 11 oz
Temperature: -38C / -36F