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Jager
2009-03-05, 01:18
I'm wondering if anyone has had any experience with walking in sandals similiar to the Teva models intended for wet conditions (rafting, etc?)

I hiked a 4okm hike last year with someone wearing them. My feet got wet and I was unable to get them dry due to conditions. Got blisters for the first time in my life. My Teva-wearing companion was fine. Said the sandal had plenty of support for walking as well.

I'm considering getting a pair for wet walking.

Jager

Mutinousdoug
2009-03-05, 12:32
The Dinks pushed bicycles loaded with 100 kilo sacks of rice along the Ho Chi Minh trail from Hanoi to Saigon for years in a primitive version of Teva sandals made from truck tires. If you don't need ankle support and your Tevas fit you well, you'll be fine.
Some pairs I've worn chafe me where the strap goes under my ankle bone, causing a hot-spot. I've never hiked more than 5-6 miles at a time in sandals and never carrying more than a daypack. YMMV

Saint Alfonzo
2009-03-05, 12:34
I have walked many a mile in Teva sandals. There are better sandals out there, but mine are not worn out yet. So, do some research, and enjoy the walk..

SGT Rock
2009-03-05, 20:54
Never tried it myself. I've thought about it lots of times.

vonfrick
2009-03-05, 20:59
that's all i do but i gotta run...i'll post back later...

MRH
2009-03-06, 13:49
About 4 miles is all I can handle with sandles... just not for me I guess...

warraghiyagey
2009-03-06, 14:46
About 4 miles is all I can handle with sandles... just not for me I guess...

Maybe cuz you're pack is too large??? . . . :biggrin:

Footslogger
2009-03-06, 14:53
I need better arch support than most sandals offer ...but I've carried them as camp/town shoes.

'Slogger

saimyoji
2009-03-07, 20:41
i hike exclusively in sandals. all seasons. just wear some wool socks in the winter and your feet stay nice and warm.

vonfrick
2009-03-09, 23:55
i always hike in tevas, after a bad experience with boots. you can find them with decent enough arch support. if it's dry i just wear liners and socks. if it's raining then i pull $20 neoprene kayak socks over them (sealskins are kind of wimpy and thin). nice thing is my toes suffer no abuse at all, i can go into streams, mud, anything and socks are clean. granted, with the neoprene my feet sweat a bit, but it's well worth it. they're lighter, less bulky and i don't have to carry a second pair of camp shoes. 800+ miles in new england this way and no complaints.

GGS
2009-03-10, 15:57
Vonfrick, when you walk through mud do you find that you get clay sediment building up between your feet and the sandals?

Here in springtime as much as 10% of the local trails can be covered with water, often a foot or more deep, and the ground is a soft clay. Rather than worry about keeping my feet dry I tried an experiment using old tennis shoes and fast drying liner socks and just plunged through the water and mud. Problem I ran into was when you lift your foot you suck water and mud into the shoe, then when you step you sqeeze out the water, but the mud stays and builds up to form annoying blobs of clay under your feet. I'd have to sit down often and remove my shoes and clean out the compacted clay with a stick.

I wouldn't mind trying it with sandals but it seems like I would have the same problem.

wrongway_08
2009-03-10, 18:18
I hiked for a while in a pair of $20.00 Nike flip flops, the kind with only one "strap" across the top of your foot.

This for about a 2 week (around there, cant remember - peanut would now) period, right before and into the Whites. Was comfy - kept the feet air'd out and I didnt have to worry about wet shoes.

I also saw a few people wear the Tevas almost the whole way. They never had problems.

vonfrick
2009-03-10, 19:30
Vonfrick, when you walk through mud do you find that you get clay sediment building up between your feet and the sandals?

Here in springtime as much as 10% of the local trails can be covered with water, often a foot or more deep, and the ground is a soft clay. Rather than worry about keeping my feet dry I tried an experiment using old tennis shoes and fast drying liner socks and just plunged through the water and mud. Problem I ran into was when you lift your foot you suck water and mud into the shoe, then when you step you sqeeze out the water, but the mud stays and builds up to form annoying blobs of clay under your feet. I'd have to sit down often and remove my shoes and clean out the compacted clay with a stick.

I wouldn't mind trying it with sandals but it seems like I would have the same problem.

nope. of course i hike in me, vt and nh. and since it never stops raining and there is no lack of little streams to splish around in i just rinse em off when i can.

Take-a-knee
2009-03-13, 23:11
I've gotten blisters from Tevas just running around a water park all day. I was north of Neel Gap this summer and ran into a young guy headed north wearing a new pair of trail runners he'd purchased at Mtn. Crossings, he said he mailed his sandals home there, they chewed his feet up in the three days from Springer to Neel.

vonfrick
2009-03-14, 20:01
I've gotten blisters from Tevas just running around a water park all day. I was north of Neel Gap this summer and ran into a young guy headed north wearing a new pair of trail runners he'd purchased at Mtn. Crossings, he said he mailed his sandals home there, they chewed his feet up in the three days from Springer to Neel.

gotta wear socks with them. sometimes the "pattern" stamped into the rubber, well...rubs the soles of my feet. i always wear liners and socks.

Hooch
2009-03-14, 20:14
I've done a couple hikes with Keens on and never had a problem with them. I think that the key to hiking in sandals is to make sure that they're very well broken in and very comfortable.