PDA

View Full Version : Pack Weight



ran90
2009-06-09, 00:47
First post here, glad to see a backpacking forums without the northface type people, anyway i can tell this place is a wealth on knowledge and tips. I know most like to talk gear so...

I have been messing with pack weight for a while and just got my pack weight down to around 15lbs. This weight is without food, though the good thing is i have plenty of room in my pack for lots of food. I am really happy with this weight because my old pack weight was around 32-35 pounds.

One of the more important drops in weight was my pack. My old one was a exterior fram pack that was fairly heavy. I dont know what its weight was or the cubic inches.
My new pack is an Osprey atmos 50- it weights about 3 pound. Its 2800cubic inches i think.

The area i have yet to improve on is the tent, which is an old 2 man tent from the 70's my grandpa gave me. Its a great tent and weights just under 4lbs. It is very water proof for being that old of a tent. I plan on using just the rain fly and seeing how that works out. *This would be an area i want to try and improve, any tips?*( Thinking about the MSR Twing)

My bag is a Kelty light year 20 down bag(2.5lbs), which is super compressable and was another big upgrade from my old sleeping bag. Mainly for the space issues.

For stoves i use sterno cans or msr pocket rocket, whcih i use a oven liner wind screen. I personally like sterno cans, but enjoy the fast boil time with the pocket rocket. I want to try these cat stoves i have been reading about.

In the pack i have everything i need. Knife,light, flint,poncho, first aid kit, duct tape, soap, iodine, small towl, half cut sponge, stuff sacks, 1 pair or extra socks, extra shirt and sandles, 1L water bottle, Rope, cookwear...and the great thing is I split most of the gear with my dad or a friend! I might be spacing on a few things but what ever i forget to put in my pack, i put it in my friends pack.

As for food i stick to dried fruits and nuts, add boiled water foods like mac and cheese or oat meal. I take 8 pound of food for two people, which lasts generally 4-5nights.

I intend to start hiking sections of the PCT this year and if there is anything i might need or tips you might have please share.

-ran

taildragger
2009-06-09, 01:21
What type of pad do you use.

the cheapie blue foam pads are light and comfy (hell, I use one instead of a bed).

The tent can give way to a tarp if you're willing to put up with the bugs.

Other than that, you've got a decent weight.

ran90
2009-06-09, 04:41
i dont use a pad(yet), for trail hikes i will but not for off trail. I was looking a tarptent and thinking of getting the squall 2 tent, possibly with out the floor. Also looking at a company called moonbow. Wish i saw equinox packs before i bought the osprey, 1.5 lbs pack 3000cubic inches $130. equinoxLTD is the site

taildragger
2009-06-09, 11:01
The tarptents are awesome, I have an old cloudburst 1, and it has served me well for buggier places.

As for the PCT, if you can get your hand on a copy of Yogi's book, that will give you a good idea of what to expect from thruhikers that used different hiking strategies (gram weenies vs some people who like a lil comfort).

Be prepared for some heat on that trail, it handed me my butt when I got sick, I took about 2 weeks to recover partially and made life very miserable in the desert.

dixicritter
2009-06-09, 15:02
I will not swerve this thread by suggesting to go hammock...

I will not swerve this thread by suggesting to go hammock...

I will not swerve this thread by suggesting to go hammock...

:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

Spogatz
2009-06-09, 15:14
I use a blue wally world pad in my "hammock"

ran90
2009-06-09, 16:55
I have been considering to get a hammock. I see a lot of pros to having a hammock. Though i just talked to the guy at tarptent and he has a floorless squall 2, not sure of the weight but the floor version is 34oz, so maybe its 7-8 oz less.

I plan on experimenting with the cat stoves while i am in san diego. Gonna live on the beach for a couple of weeks.

Pappyhighlife
2009-06-09, 17:04
I still use my large ALICE but she is only weighing in at 25 to 30 pounds these days. I carry 3 days of food normally which only weighs 2 to 3 pounds.

(It can be extended to 5 by conserving)

I have subscribed to Freezer bag cooking the last few years. Really reduced the weight and tastes much better, plus I eat real meat.

In the summer I have my HH a closed cell pad and my poncho with it's poncho liner for sleeping and it serves me well. Don't weigh hardly nothing.

Sounds like your rig is well thought out, when you field test it you can work out the kinks and tweak it til it's perfect.

ran90
2009-06-09, 19:52
That sound like a great idea, do you do it at home? Just add boiled water right?

Finding food thats light, healthy and will give you energy is tough to find...
mmmm green beans with butter and bits of cooked bacon... i can smell it now.

will stop by wally world to check out some pads.

dont want to seem like a jong but REI is a great place to scope out equipment, find it online for less $$ or do it your self.

Spogatz
2009-06-12, 13:45
a Hennessy hammock makes a nice tarp tent with a bug screen when set up on the ground with hiking poles.

ran90
2009-06-12, 15:18
Yeah I want to look into it. My tarp tent just got in. I am still trying to figure out what type of stove to use, my dad is moving and taking the pocket rocket. I am a fan of sterno cans, what's everyones opinion? I am going to compare the basic cat stove to the sterno cans. I just don't want to spend the $$ on another pocket rocket, and fuel cost. The cost of the fuel can buy two sterno cans or 24fl oz of heet. Anyone else compare srerno to a cat stove?

Joker
2009-06-13, 17:20
Ran, really recommend that you build yourself a cat stove and give it a try. I've used a sideburner stove that I built myself for a little over a year. One oz of HEET will boil 2 cups of water in 4-5 mins. The only cost is a 50 cent can of catfood. Probably the simplest stove to build, but you'll need a windscreen.

Keys
2009-06-15, 01:54
Good to get the weight down. Extra pounds and even ounces will not please you on ascents and descents. As to warming up food: consider Esbit cubes. You can find them at, among other places, the REI Web site. The site gives weights for the costliest (only relatively) cookset to go with the Esbit chemical tablets. I like the pocket stove, but one should get what works for one's situation. As they say, each tablet lasts 12 tgo 15 minutes and provides good heat.

Can't advise much on food. I have to stick to a very lowfat diet & advice on high-fat foods to boost calories are out of my league. However, I do like Lipton's (oops, now Knorr) Rice & Beans, which provide, I believe, a complete protein, plus textured soy (a/k/a vegetable) protein, which should be available at stores appealing to vegetarians. That stuff, topped by dehydrated peas, can be a key to many an evening meal.

Dry milk is pretty good, too, with a good high-fiber, high protein cereal. I use a ratio of 1 water to 1/2 milk, e.g, 1 1/2 cuts of water to 3/4 cup of milk. Most makers recommend 1 water to 1/3 milk; I think that's too watery & a bit more milk has worked well for me every day, for years. Those changes will boost protein and won't cost a lot.

A California company, Health Valley, formerly made good no-fat bars; their current low-fat bars are pretty nutritious and also may be available in a store appealing to vegetarians. That and other things are needed for nutritional and energy pick-you-ups during the day. One can run out of gas without enough fuel in the body on a trail like the PCT, for sure. I'd advise that you run my advice on food past someone else. I've gotten advice that might have worked for someone else, but that set me back when I followed it.

ran90
2009-06-15, 03:07
Food is almost number one on my list for my pack. I am sure the food I take will change but currently add water mashed potatos and cous cous are at the top of the list. Irish oats, granola and rasins are my breakfast. I find snacks to be the most important for those mid daynenergy needs, something like candy or dried fruits. Still looking to get that protien in meals.

As far as the cat stove goes I plan on trying one out soon. I look forward to having a cheapnetove and fuel source. Wind screen won't be a probelm. Still not sure if I should make the basic cat stove or the little more complicated one. When I mean basic I mean the one with just the air and burner holes cut into the can.

I am sitting on the beach in San diego right now, man I love the iPhone! I need to get one.

TOW
2009-06-17, 09:22
I have a Gregory Shasta, a big pack. I had a Dana Design Longbed before this one and it was even bigger. When I use to hike all the time I liked having all my comforts but I have begun to hike again some and now I think it is best I hike with as little as I can get buy with having most of my weight in food. I have high blood sugar but I also have low blood sugar as well so I need to be able to keep my body in check.

ran90
2009-06-18, 00:55
just got home from san diego and got to take out the tent. The tent i got was the squall 2 floorless. With a tarp from walmart and the tent, the set up weights 2.6 pounds! Its a great tent i have yet to use it but i set it up in the backyard. Cant wait to field test it along with the cat stove i will make. Only probelm now is i need to adjust how i pack my pack because of the tents pack shape.

Thanks for all the help everyone, and ill let ya know how everything works out.

neomonkey
2009-06-20, 20:54
I just got back from my first backpacking trip. It was to the Grand Canyon, doing the rim to rim hike. My pack weight was 23 lbs without food. This included a backpack, tent, pad, sleeping bag, clothes for 3 days (not much), knife. I rented most of the stuff from REI so I don't remember the exact model numbers. I also had miscellaneous stuff like a camera, small camcorder, extra batteries. I didn't have a stove or gas, my friend carried it.

I'm wondering how low I can reasonably get my pack weight for any overnight trip. The backpack itself was 7 lbs!

ran90
2009-06-20, 22:08
The biggest areas where you can drop pack weight are,
1. your pack
2. sleeping bag
3. tent
4. cooking stuff
5. extras
Go to REI to look at gear and then go online to find it for less $$$
I would go with a cheap day pack, i mean for an over night with out super light gear you could easily go under 10lbs

Joker
2009-06-20, 22:26
Food is almost number one on my list for my pack. I am sure the food I take will change but currently add water mashed potatos and cous cous are at the top of the list. Irish oats, granola and rasins are my breakfast. I find snacks to be the most important for those mid daynenergy needs, something like candy or dried fruits. Still looking to get that protien in meals.

As far as the cat stove goes I plan on trying one out soon. I look forward to having a cheapnetove and fuel source. Wind screen won't be a probelm. Still not sure if I should make the basic cat stove or the little more complicated one. When I mean basic I mean the one with just the air and burner holes cut into the can.

I am sitting on the beach in San diego right now, man I love the iPhone! I need to get one.

Ran,
If you want to add a little protein to the diet, I'd really look into some TVP (texturized vegetable protein,...aka soy-meat-product). You can get a pound of beef, chicken, pork, taco, etc. falvored TVP for about $5 plus shipping (search the internet for TVP). Add that to some instant mashed potatoes or cous cous plus some McCormick/Schilling spices and/or gravy mix, you've got yourself some Class A trail meals.

ran90
2009-06-22, 12:45
TVP may be the the solution. Thanks i almost forgot about it.

Update: Pack went up to around 16lbs 5oz or so, i added a water filter....i know but i dont like iodine plus to much is bad fro the liver.

Roche
2009-06-24, 20:03
I've had luck with Aquamire Water Treatment as well as Katadyn Micropur Tablets, using them with "respectable" water sources. Steripen looks interesting. Also try reading everything you can about water treatment and the prevention of catching g.i. (don't reach into a shared bag of gorp). Until dehydrated water is invented...

ran90
2009-06-24, 22:20
I have tried making a cat stove and have yet to get a boil with even 1floz of HEET. Not sure what i am doing wrong but i have a stand and wind screen. Any tips? Want to try and figure it out so i can get a hike in the week.

ran90
2009-06-25, 17:55
Got water to boil, cat stove works fairly well, 2 cup in 4 min.

Anyway i packed all my gear in my bag and got the weight down to 14.8lbs. With a solid 4 nights and 4 days worth of food it weights just over 20lbs close to 21. So with water maybe 23-24lbs. I cant wait to test it and see what i can add and drop. Going to hike a section of the PCT, highway4 and 88 or 4 to 108.

only thing is i have yet to pack a sleeping pad.

ran90
2009-06-25, 22:57
This is where i plan on hiking next.