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View Full Version : Hanging in a state/local campground



robanna
2010-06-10, 17:12
I was recently in a local campground with some friends who were RVing it. I set up my hammock and the ranger came by and asked me to take it down since anything that completely encircles a tree is not allowed. I didn't argue the point that this setup would not leave any noticeable mark let alone hurt the tree in anyway since he was just doing his job. I just waited until dark, setup, and then tore it down at first light but that's besides the point.

Anyways, does anyone have any thought on how to hang from a tree without going all the way around the trunk? How does one get around this rule? Educating the ranges would be nice but highly unlikely. Since it's car camping, weight is not an issue.

My first thought was to tie off on a pipe, 2x4 or similar through the crotch of a tree but that would mean to tree the right distance with a good crotch in each. Not likely.

enviro
2010-06-10, 17:18
I was recently in a local campground with some friends who were RVing it. I set up my hammock and the ranger came by and asked me to take it down since anything that completely encircles a tree is not allowed. I didn't argue the point that this setup would not leave any noticeable mark let alone hurt the tree in anyway since he was just doing his job. I just waited until dark, setup, and then tore it down at first light but that's besides the point.

Anyways, does anyone have any thought on how to hang from a tree without going all the way around the trunk? How does one get around this rule? Educating the ranges would be nice but highly unlikely. Since it's car camping, weight is not an issue.

My first thought was to tie off on a pipe, 2x4 or similar through the crotch of a tree but that would mean to tree the right distance with a good crotch in each. Not likely.

They make aluminum hammock stands for your backyard/porch. Check Wally World or something similar.

SGT Rock
2010-06-10, 18:16
I've heard this is an issue in North Carolina state parks. I've never experienced it.

321GO
2010-06-11, 15:33
I live in FL and it took me awhile to come around but in a heavily used park it's a good rule to have. The parks have to assume everyone that camps on that site is going to tie something around that tree and then yes, it would damage the tree.

MonkeyBoy
2010-06-11, 15:37
Most of them don't want things tied to trees because it becomes a hazard at night when kids run through camp and clothesline themselves.

You could drill a hole all of the way through the tree and therefore only tie off halfway around the trunk......... :)

Skidsteer
2010-06-11, 18:23
Or use carbon fiber staples...

Lugnut
2010-06-11, 21:07
Hollow so you don't strangle the sap.

vonfrick
2010-06-15, 00:28
Most of them don't want things tied to trees because it becomes a hazard at night when kids run through camp and clothesline themselves.

You could drill a hole all of the way through the tree and therefore only tie off halfway around the trunk......... :)

last time i was in maine, i cut at least 3 clotheslines off trees that had been left. i imagine if left long enough the tree gets 'strangled' and deformed

JAK
2010-06-15, 09:57
You could make a clamp that only goes part way around, but it would be heavy, and harder on the tree.

Actually, come to think of it, there could be a way of setting up some sort of 'linkage', in the kinematics sense of the term, similar to that used for plows, where the force is transmitted as though it were going directly through the tree, from one or two points on the backside of the tree. The idea would be to reduce the tearing forces on the tree, and reduce the bending or forces on the linkage so it might weigh less and still not separate creep its way from around the tree. You would still need a way to keep it from slipping down the tree, without digging into it. Also, the pads at each point would need to be sufficient.

JAK
2010-06-15, 10:08
It's not the linkage I was talking about, but there are fittings for use as a temporary boom vang on sailboats, sometimes called a preventer. I think the fitting itself might be called a boom claw. Not sure. It can't go all the way around because of the sail. Usually they are a fixed diameter though, as you can slip it on from the end or where the boom is more narrow. Not really practical with a tree. It would have to have a jaw that can open and close.

Actually I think that is it. If you had a simple 2 bar linkage, like a jaw that can open and close, with pads on the end so it doesn't dig in too much where it contacts the tree. Now on the hammock side of the jaw you would have a series of holes, and depending on which set of holes you used for attaching your hammock, it could be adjusted to be neutral, neither opening the jaw nor closing it. You would still need to keep it from slipping down, without tieing something around the tree. You could just place it at a point where there are a couple of branches to keep it from slipping down.

enviro
2010-06-15, 13:49
I agree with Vonfrick clothslines are more dangerous to trees than hammocks. People are not likely to leave their hammcok straps behind and if straps are used they will not cut into a tree like a rope.

Hammocks will probably be tied to different places by each individual and not impact the tree in the same place each time.

It is important to tie off on healthy live trees though.

Course you could use some sort of Rube Goldberg device that takes a physicist to put up.

Dancer
2010-06-15, 16:08
A group of us went to Standing Indian Campground about a year ago and set up 5 hammocks on a 'group' campsite that we paid extra for. The caretaker (not a ranger) came by and had a fit. I was there alone and refused to break down. He said that any tents had to be on the gravel pad. I explained that they weren't tents and couldn't be set up on gravel. I also showed him that they didn't harm the trees and wouldn't leave any damage to the ground or undergrowth. He told me to take them down and left. He came back about an hour later and said he had gotten us permission to stay one night in hammocks but if someone else wanted the spot he would have to make us leave.

I told this story at a Hammock Forums hang a few months later and others said they had never had a problem there...... who knows.

saimyoji
2010-06-16, 00:48
A group of us went to Standing Indian Campground about a year ago and set up 5 hammocks on a 'group' campsite that we paid extra for. The caretaker (not a ranger) came by and had a fit. I was there alone and refused to break down. He said that any tents had to be on the gravel pad. I explained that they weren't tents and couldn't be set up on gravel. I also showed him that they didn't harm the trees and wouldn't leave any damage to the ground or undergrowth. He told me to take them down and left. He came back about an hour later and said he had gotten us permission to stay one night in hammocks but if someone else wanted the spot he would have to make us leave.

I told this story at a Hammock Forums hang a few months later and others said they had never had a problem there...... who knows.

prolly gave you shit cause you're a Hoochie Mama.....:aetsch:

Two Speed
2010-06-16, 09:01
That explains it. That and not having her tree clamps handy.

JAK
2010-06-16, 10:12
I guess the trouble with work around solutions is the don't really fix the problem. People are hard to figure out sometimes. Sometimes you can work around people that are being difficult. Sometimes you can't. Sometimes it helps to think of them as part of nature. People are like lightning sometimes. There is only so much you can do about them.

SGT Rock
2010-06-17, 08:19
I think the issue around these sorts of campsites are experiences with car campers hanging lanterns against trees, or nailing stuff to trees, or tying stuff off to trees and then cutting the ropes and leaving the tree girdled with rope after they are gone. That sort of thing leads to a zero tolerance policy against things like hammocks even when they are done correctly - mainly because the guy in charge doesn't want to let one person get away with it because they are responsible, but then have to explain to the drunk redneck across the gravel road why you get to hang from the tree, but he doesn't get to tie off his junk to trees.

One reason I avoid staying in those types of established sites at places like Standing Indian. Park at Rock Gap and walk a hundred yards up the AT and hang all you want out of his sight.

Wise Old Owl
2011-01-21, 18:54
Another Heads up is not to be the first set of campers of the year... The Rangers have been board for a while and they make a habit of visiting and doing drive bys.


Makes Stealth camping fun.

hrbngr
2011-04-14, 04:38
Isnt there anywy thay maybe sme sort of Rubber sleeve could go around the tree first so theres no damage. and you can alway hang a few chemlight off the rope so no one will clothsline themsleves.

See interesting that ONE day permission would be negated by someone wanted to stay there later...ONE day or four days that hammock is up already doesnt the ONE day already defeat the purpose anyway of thepark NOT wanting them up. very strange people out there it seems,,,no issues here yet but I am not willing to get too close to the cactus here in Px to try to hang a Hammock..

Am looking at a N.A by Clark ..maybe time to get rid of the Northface bulfrog 23

mudhead
2011-04-16, 09:40
Rock got it. Lowest common denominator. State Parks here have gone to the annoyance extreme.

Seems you can hang a clothesline high enough that you don't catch it in the face. Or am I missing something?

Wise Old Owl
2011-04-21, 20:55
Ok lets really answer the question.... Grab your paracord and axe and get to work

http://img375.imageshack.us/img375/605/dscn1625x.jpg

Remember Lashing?

http://www.instructables.com/image/F41M0KVG5KPAJN7/Stand-the-Tripod.jpg

due to the weight requirements you need 1" stock and three 9 -12 feet poles.

a rope at the bottom of the tripod to keep integrity and long masonary nails to secure the tripod and guy the damn thing down..

Wise Old Owl
2011-04-21, 21:10
Hold on - hmmm allow me to pat myself on the back... ahhhhhhhhh. pass the :beer:

awe come on laugh...tis funny.