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View Full Version : It turns out that if you want to cash in, NOT completing the trail is a good idea.



Jester
2011-02-03, 12:56
http://www.startribune.com/local/west/114846184.html?page=1&c=y

Big Mac
2011-02-03, 13:10
Sounded like a solid decision to me.

Lone Wolf
2011-02-03, 13:12
i would go ahead and apply for a patch and certificate if i were him. would look good on his CEO office wall

Two Speed
2011-02-03, 13:23
"GPS worked fairly well on the trail, but Hanson said he also relied on a paper map of the trail brought along by his travel companion, Gary Steffens.

GPS had some problems with the ambiguities of the trail, and it also added significantly to time spent finding the way, Steffens said. "The biggest enemy we were battling on the trail was that we weren't making the time that a sighted person would make on the trail."

A couple of buddies and I ran into them at Standing Indian as we were leaving the backcountry kiosk. Hanson & Stevens couldn't find their way from the camp ground to Hwy 64 without a lift, then weren't sure which way to turn on the highway to thumb their way into Franklin.

'Nuff said.

Big Mac
2011-02-03, 14:23
Yep, sounds like he'll make a fine CEO.

Jester
2011-02-03, 15:43
Sounded like a solid decision to me.

I think it actually probably was a good decision. Though he's now the CEO of a company that doesn't actually exist. I hope things pan out for him.

It's just that it seems to be a trend (or maybe it's just more noticeable with all of the available info online) that people come up with these grand plans, tell everyone about it, set up a website, solicit attention, sponsorships and donations, and then, when the whole thing falls apart, they change the goal, declare mission accomplished, and proceed to attempt to cash in. Which in my mind tells me that the hike was never really important anyway (which is one of the reasons why it failed. Yeah, I said it. FAILED.)

Bryson was the first noticeable person to do so. More recently we had the guy who never actually intended to hike the trail, but set up a website detailing his plans so that he could market himself & get a job.

And "The Initiative" guy, who set a goal of hiking four trails in one year and then changed the goal on his website when it was clear that his goal was ridiculous for him.

And Hanson, who stated that his goal from the beginning was to: a) hike the entire trail and b) use a GPS to do so without any other physical guidance, in order to c) prove the independence of those with disabilities. Oh, and to d) make a movie along the way.

So now he's "proved his point," without actually achieving his stated goals (other than making the movie)?

Maybe. But it's a weird trend.

Kanga
2011-02-03, 19:22
jester, i'm really glad einstein and madame curie and others didn't listen to those that told them that what they were doing was impossible. no, not everybody that sets a seemingly unreachable goal will get there, but god bless them for trying. otherwise, we'd still be eating raw meat and wiping our asses with our hands in the dark, dying from staph infections.

Jester
2011-02-03, 20:04
jester, i'm really glad einstein and madame curie and others didn't listen to those that told them that what they were doing was impossible. no, not everybody that sets a seemingly unreachable goal will get there, but god bless them for trying. otherwise, we'd still be eating raw meat and wiping our asses with our hands in the dark, dying from staph infections.

I'll have you know that when Einstein hiked the trail (trailname: E=MC Hammer Pants), he kept it to himself. Yeah, it was a dream. And then he went out and did it.

Dreaming big is awesome. Accomplishing your dreams is even better. But none of the other nonsense is necessary to do either of those things, unless your dream is really to have a lot of people pay attention to you.

rcli4
2011-02-03, 20:34
1700 miles is a long walk....

Clyde

Jester
2011-02-03, 21:35
1700 miles is a long walk....

Clyde

It's a very long walk. But if you told me you were going to drive me to San Diego and you dropped me off at St. Louis instead, I wouldn't try to pretend that the Mississippi was the Pacific Ocean.

Tin Man
2011-02-03, 21:46
It's a very long walk. But if you told me you were going to drive me to San Diego and you dropped me off at St. Louis instead, I wouldn't try to pretend that the Mississippi was the Pacific Ocean.

gee golly, can't pull the wool over your eyes so easy...

Lone Wolf
2011-02-03, 22:16
I'll have you know that when Einstein hiked the trail (trailname: E=MC Hammer Pants), he kept it to himself. Yeah, it was a dream. And then he went out and did it.

Dreaming big is awesome. Accomplishing your dreams is even better. But none of the other nonsense is necessary to do either of those things, unless your dream is really to have a lot of people pay attention to you.


1700 miles is a long walk....

Clyde


It's a very long walk. But if you told me you were going to drive me to San Diego and you dropped me off at St. Louis instead, I wouldn't try to pretend that the Mississippi was the Pacific Ocean.

fuckin' guy didn't deliver. period. BFD

Jester
2011-02-03, 22:21
gee golly, can't pull the wool over your eyes so easy...

I dunno. I think I'm probably pretty easy to fool.


fuckin' guy didn't deliver. period. BFD

Yup.

Hikerhead
2011-02-03, 22:47
Does it cost 60/night to stay at the Big Walker Hotel. I thought that place was now used by methheads for around 25/night?

4eyedbuzzard
2011-02-03, 23:26
Hiking ain't normally a cash-in proposition, it's a cash-out deal. Unless you're a panhandler looking for donations like the http://www.gofundme.com/thelongwalk kid.

Hanson has a law degree but was complaining about being unable to get work lawyering - so he went hiking to promote himself. He attracted attention, which seems like what his hike was all about anyway.

Our All-in Trekker 34 mpd boy Sam is maybe 1/2 way through NY, averaging maybe 8 mpd, whining about his snowshoes not being any good in deep snow. He's mostly an attention whore with a fantasy and a website. He'll quit soon as well, but the rah-rah crowd will praise him for pursuing his "dream" even though it was fuckin' absurd from the get-go.

Now if Skurka or others like that lay out plans to do some crazy hard-ass hike, people will take them seriously because 1) they don't plan shit they can't possibly do, and 2) they got some proven experience to back them up.

MonkeyBoy
2011-02-03, 23:58
I think it actually probably was a good decision. Though he's now the CEO of a company that doesn't actually exist. I hope things pan out for him.

It's just that it seems to be a trend (or maybe it's just more noticeable with all of the available info online) that people come up with these grand plans, tell everyone about it, set up a website, solicit attention, sponsorships and donations, and then, when the whole thing falls apart, they change the goal, declare mission accomplished, and proceed to attempt to cash in. Which in my mind tells me that the hike was never really important anyway (which is one of the reasons why it failed. Yeah, I said it. FAILED.)

Bryson was the first noticeable person to do so. More recently we had the guy who never actually intended to hike the trail, but set up a website detailing his plans so that he could market himself & get a job.

And "The Initiative" guy, who set a goal of hiking four trails in one year and then changed the goal on his website when it was clear that his goal was ridiculous for him.

And Hanson, who stated that his goal from the beginning was to: a) hike the entire trail and b) use a GPS to do so without any other physical guidance, in order to c) prove the independence of those with disabilities. Oh, and to d) make a movie along the way.

So now he's "proved his point," without actually achieving his stated goals (other than making the movie)?

Maybe. But it's a weird trend.

I wonder if he "pulled a Jester" while making his movie....... :)

Jester
2011-02-04, 00:02
Hiking ain't normally a cash-in proposition, it's a cash-out deal. Unless you're a panhandler looking for donations like the http://www.gofundme.com/thelongwalk kid.

Hanson has a law degree but was complaining about being unable to get work lawyering - so he went hiking to promote himself. He attracted attention, which seems like what his hike was all about anyway.

Our All-in Trekker 34 mpd boy Sam is maybe 1/2 way through NY, averaging maybe 8 mpd, whining about his snowshoes not being any good in deep snow. He's mostly an attention whore with a fantasy and a website. He'll quit soon as well, but the rah-rah crowd will praise him for pursuing his "dream" even though it was fuckin' absurd from the get-go.

Now if Skurka or others like that lay out plans to do some crazy hard-ass hike, people will take them seriously because 1) they don't plan shit they can't possibly do, and 2) they got some proven experience to back them up.

Yeah. What you said.

I don't have that much of a problem with the fund me kid. It appears that it's mostly for friends and family to give him money, and I suppose I'm cool with that (not that anyone should care all that much with what I'm cool with). Someone might want to tell him that he'd get a lot more satisfaction out of earning the money to do it himself, but whatever. I'm not going to be a hypocrite -- I'd probably do just about anything and accept money from anyone to be able to hike. Maybe not anything.

I agree with you regarding Skurka. And by looking at him I guess I see part of the problem I have with the others. It's pretty clear to me that the people who have experience, the people who are badass hikers that become well known, become well known by virtue of dreams that they are trying to accomplish for their own personal reasons. And then they set out to accomplish them. And over time, as they actually do what they set out to do, people want to keep track of them and follow their journeys. And so they end up becoming well known after they've completed something, anything, rather than beforehand.

The others don't seem to want to be out there just to be out there.

Jester
2011-02-04, 00:08
I wonder if he "pulled a Jester" while making his movie....... :)

I'm sure he pulled a whole mess of Jesters. He's blind. I'm the one with no excuse.

I did make a movie about my hike, so maybe I'm guilty of the very thing I'm complaining about. But I didn't have a website about it beforehand, I didn't ask anyone for money, and I had the experience to hike and film. Heck, I didn't even have a trail journal online. Because as big an ego as I have (it can be seen from space), even I don't actually believe that people want to read about the day-to-day crap I go through.

And to tell the truth, I didn't even decide to make the movie until I was home. Here's something really boring to mostly everyone that I wrote about filming on trail:

http://omails.blogspot.com/

MonkeyBoy
2011-02-04, 00:12
I'm sure he pulled a whole mess of Jesters. He's blind. I'm the one with no excuse.

I did make a movie about my hike, so maybe I'm guilty of the very thing I'm complaining about. But I didn't have a website about it beforehand, I didn't ask anyone for money, and I had the experience to hike and film. Heck, I didn't even have a trail journal online. Because as big an ego as I have (it can be seen from space), even I don't actually believe that people want to read about the day-to-day crap I go through.

And to tell the truth, I didn't even decide to make the movie until I was home. Here's something really boring to mostly everyone that I wrote about filming on trail:

http://omails.blogspot.com/

Just messing with ya. I enjoyed the flick.

Jester
2011-02-04, 00:49
Just messing with ya. I enjoyed the flick.

I fall down a lot. Only some of them ended up in the movie. I'm a big clumsy mess.

MonkeyBoy
2011-02-04, 09:21
Only the really good ones where you stick a Leki into your leg make the cut..........

D'Artagnan
2011-02-04, 09:53
I blame most of this on "reality TV". Everybody with a camcorder now thinks what they're doing is worthy of everyone else's attention. I don't deny it's admirable that a blind guy hiked 1,700 miles of the AT -- with or without help, that's nothing to sneeze at -- I just have a problem with everything nowadays being used to say "Hey, watch me. I'm special".

warraghiyagey
2011-02-04, 09:56
I blame most of this on "reality TV". Everybody with a camcorder now thinks what they're doing is worthy of everyone else's attention. I don't deny it's admirable that a blind guy hiked 1,700 miles of the AT -- with or without help, that's nothing to sneeze at -- I just have a problem with everything nowadays being used to say "Hey, watch me. I'm special".

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-transport030.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

MonkeyBoy
2011-02-04, 10:00
tcWKz97WQFA

4eyedbuzzard
2011-02-04, 11:39
I don't have that much of a problem with the fund me kid. It appears that it's mostly for friends and family to give him money . . .I thought it was over the top begging when he put it on WB asking for money. My response got me a weeks vacation. :D


Someone might want to tell him that he'd get a lot more satisfaction out of earning the money to do it himself, but whatever. I'm not going to be a hypocrite -- I'd probably do just about anything and accept money from anyone to be able to hike. Maybe not anything
I doubt that people who are willing to panhandle for vacation money (we're not talking food / subsistence here) care much about pride, satitisfaction, etc. Yeah, the kid is only 18 but still, when did it become okay to panhandle for vacation money? I seem to remember working for my spending money at that age.

Jester
2011-02-04, 12:35
I blame most of this on "reality TV". Everybody with a camcorder now thinks what they're doing is worthy of everyone else's attention. I don't deny it's admirable that a blind guy hiked 1,700 miles of the AT -- with or without help, that's nothing to sneeze at -- I just have a problem with everything nowadays being used to say "Hey, watch me. I'm special".

I agree. Everybody today thinks they should be famous. And if you look on TV and notice how many talentless people are now famous and wealthy for having done nothing whatsoever, I can see how the idea of, "hey, but I'm ACTUALLY doing something" gets into people's heads. As far as long distance hiking goes, all you're really doing is walking somewhere. But maybe that's just us, because we're a part of it and we don't consider it all that novel.


I thought it was over the top begging when he put it on WB asking for money. My response got me a weeks vacation. :D


I doubt that people who are willing to panhandle for vacation money (we're not talking food / subsistence here) care much about pride, satitisfaction, etc. Yeah, the kid is only 18 but still, when did it become okay to panhandle for vacation money? I seem to remember working for my spending money at that age.

Yeah, I think it would have been best for him to keep it to friends and family. Asking strangers for money without offering anything in return is odd to me. I once saw a beef and beer night advertised near me where the people involved were raising money to pay for a shore house rental. Beef & Beers in my mind were reserved for raising money for people in trouble -- a death in the family or a medical emergency. The shore house people seemed just as strange as the fund me kid.

Ray
2011-02-04, 15:26
I ain't now and never will be a thru hiker of the big Trails but I'd like to throw out a point that a lot (many, most, all?) thru hikers really set out with thru-hiking some trail as a secondary goal. From my vantage point atop a water bar, most seem to be looking for some personal change whether they can express it well or not. Nearly everyone starts a thru at some transition point in their life.

I can't blame anyone for finding what they're looking for before the odometer says they're through; nor anyone that learns wilderness walking isn't the right path to their real goals.

But there are those few who manage to finish the Trail without any apparent personal change or spiritual growth at all. That's really sad.

cool breeze
2011-02-04, 15:30
The journey is the destination.

Tin Man
2011-02-04, 16:05
The journey is the destination.

not always... :argh:

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR4lmc5Z4bmboZE--9uS3M0UN_jFW2kt9WxI143wUHMV3ZQSMiXJQ

Skidsteer
2011-02-04, 18:23
But there are those few who manage to finish the Trail without any apparent personal change or spiritual growth at all. That's really sad.

I agree, but I tend to think that for those people it's just a sound byte of the rest of their life.

Bearpaw
2011-02-05, 22:39
I ain't now and never will be a thru hiker of the big Trails but I'd like to throw out a point that a lot (many, most, all?) thru hikers really set out with thru-hiking some trail as a secondary goal. From my vantage point atop a water bar, most seem to be looking for some personal change whether they can express it well or not. Nearly everyone starts a thru at some transition point in their life.

There is definitely some truth to that. I wanted a hellaciously cool vacation when I got out of the Marine Corps. A journey when I made most of the calls for myself, barring weather or wierd circumstances. Even so, I was so rigid in how I did things from the Marine Corps, I was one of those folks who stuck to my pre-planned schedule for the first three weeks of the hike. I stayed pretty close to the plan for nearly six weeks. I think I finally broke away from the push-through-it-all mentality when I packed up in Damascus, stopped for breakfast at Cowboys, decided I sure as hell didn't feel like hiking just then, and I walked back to the Place for another day. It was a breakthrough moment, and I finally felt like I was on vacation.


The journey is the destination.

Maybe, but I sure would have felt like my hike was a failure without walking on to Katahdin. The journey became the destination, but only as long as it led the destination. Or some mess like that.

Jester, I'm with you on this one. If you're tooting your horn before your hike, is it still really your hike? Or does it start belonging to everybody else that reads your blog/website?

I post a lot of trip reports not to brag about what I do (and let's face it - my trips are pretty damned mellow these days), but because I hope my photos inspire other folks to get out there and walk too. A lot of my favorite hikes happened because of a photo I saw about that particular trail.

I'm gonna get another beer now.

Jester
2011-02-06, 01:06
I'm gonna get another beer now.

Beer. Good idea. Getting one myself.

MonkeyBoy
2011-02-06, 01:14
Beer. Good idea. Getting one myself.

Is it one of those Chinese beers???

Jester
2011-02-06, 01:22
Is it one of those Chinese beers???

All out. Drinking PBR.

Kanga
2011-02-06, 11:12
cow piss in a can. good choice.

4eyedbuzzard
2011-02-06, 11:22
cow piss in a can. good choice.
Well, I guess if anyone would know...
I'd hate to hear what you cowgirls call a black and tan :beer:

Kanga
2011-02-06, 11:33
i'd call that decent stuff. well, depends on who makes it.

Big Mac
2011-02-06, 18:46
Well, I guess if anyone would know...
I'd hate to hear what you cowgirls call a black and tan :beer:


i'd call that decent stuff. well, depends on who makes it.

Well, I am totally shocked. I thought for sure she'd say it was a coonhound. :albertein

saimyoji
2011-02-07, 00:27
cow piss in a can. good choice.

http://f00.inventorspot.com/images/hot_calpis.jpg

enviro
2011-02-07, 11:33
There is definitely some truth to that. I wanted a hellaciously cool vacation when I got out of the Marine Corps. A journey when I made most of the calls for myself, barring weather or wierd circumstances. Even so, I was so rigid in how I did things from the Marine Corps, I was one of those folks who stuck to my pre-planned schedule for the first three weeks of the hike. I stayed pretty close to the plan for nearly six weeks. I think I finally broke away from the push-through-it-all mentality when I packed up in Damascus, stopped for breakfast at Cowboys, decided I sure as hell didn't feel like hiking just then, and I walked back to the Place for another day. It was a breakthrough moment, and I finally felt like I was on vacation.



Maybe, but I sure would have felt like my hike was a failure without walking on to Katahdin. The journey became the destination, but only as long as it led the destination. Or some mess like that.

Jester, I'm with you on this one. If you're tooting your horn before your hike, is it still really your hike? Or does it start belonging to everybody else that reads your blog/website?

I post a lot of trip reports not to brag about what I do (and let's face it - my trips are pretty damned mellow these days), but because I hope my photos inspire other folks to get out there and walk too. A lot of my favorite hikes happened because of a photo I saw about that particular trail.
I'm gonna get another beer now.

I like your trip reports. It doesn't seem like braging at all. On here it's more like sharing your experience with friends.