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Weary
2011-04-20, 15:49
I buy my rough sawn timbers for bog bridges at a one man saw mill located on the Kennebec River a couple of miles up the road from my house. A pair of eagles have nested a couple of hundred feet from the mill for the past few years.

I discovered a couple of days ago that a web cam is focused on the eagle's nest. To have a look open:
http://www.briloon.org/watching-wildlife/eagle-cam3.php

Tin Man
2011-04-20, 16:17
cool, but what's with the olive garden ad for a game hen dish covering up the eagle working on the nest?

Weary
2011-04-20, 17:08
cool, but what's with the olive garden ad for a game hen dish covering up the eagle working on the nest?
I'm guessing that the sale of ads is how the site pays for it's cameras and other expenses, possibly even for some of its scientific research.

john pickett
2011-04-20, 17:46
Beautiful, Thanks for sharing that.

Tin Man
2011-04-20, 19:51
I'm guessing that the sale of ads is how the site pays for it's cameras and other expenses, possibly even for some of its scientific research.

no kidding

Sierra Echo
2011-04-20, 19:59
Its not home right now!

Kanga
2011-04-20, 20:02
great link weary. here's the one i've been watching.

Kanga
2011-04-20, 20:03
great link weary. here's the one i've been watching.
http://www.dukefarms.org/Education/Eagle-Cam/

Kanga
2011-04-20, 20:04
she's feeding them some kind of animal right now!

Tin Man
2011-04-20, 20:07
she's feeding them some kind of animal right now!

wow. awesome!

General
2011-04-20, 20:18
bald eagles a plenty in alaska. 20 - 30 on the docks at a time, every day. they like the easy meal.

Kanga
2011-04-20, 20:24
wow. awesome!

i know! how cool is that?!


i think they got fish for dinner. there's still some in the middle of the bottom view.

JAK
2011-04-21, 09:39
There is a small section on the Foggy Footpath that still has the remnants of a corduroy road from the logging days. Neat when you come across stuff like that. It is nice to see that nature has a capacity to reclaim wilderness, and that some man-made features can be so compatible with natural habitat, both aesthetically and ecologically.

JAK
2011-04-21, 09:42
cool, but what's with the olive garden ad for a game hen dish covering up the eagle working on the nest?The eagle mom was just practicing a little free enterprise. You know how much it cost to raise an eaglet these days?

Spogatz
2011-04-21, 10:55
bald eagles a plenty in alaska. 20 - 30 on the docks at a time, every day. They like the easy meal.

you eat the bald eagles???

Gray Blazer
2011-04-21, 11:43
They might eat you. I've seen them eating roadkill/carrion with the vultures.

General
2011-04-21, 18:47
you eat the bald eagles???

hell yes, they're big enough for 3 meals a piece. don't taste very good though. all dark meat like a goose. they are tough as all get out too. gotta shoot one about 10 times with turkey load before it finally croaks.

Gray Blazer
2011-04-21, 22:56
hell yes, they're big enough for 3 meals a piece. don't taste very good though. all dark meat like a goose. they are tough as all get out too. gotta shoot one about 10 times with turkey load before it finally croaks.

Manatees tastes much better. Easier to kill.

cool breeze
2011-04-21, 23:20
Manatees tastes much better. Easier to kill.

Sea cow, tastes like beef.

MonkeyBoy
2011-04-22, 01:08
I went to Sea World with the family once. They have a manatee exhibit, and the lady tour guide was talking about manatee for about ten minutes. At the end of her spiele, she asked the group if anyone had any questions. After a long awkward pause when everyone was looking around to see who would ask a question, I just slowly raised my hand in the back of the room.

When she asked what my question was, I simply replied "Is it true that they taste like chicken?"

She just blinked at me a couple of times, mouth agape, and then moved on to the next person's question.

I was offended. :)

Gray Blazer
2011-04-22, 12:35
I went to Sea World with the family once. They have a manatee exhibit, and the lady tour guide was talking about manatee for about ten minutes. At the end of her spiele, she asked the group if anyone had any questions. After a long awkward pause when everyone was looking around to see who would ask a question, I just slowly raised my hand in the back of the room.

When she asked what my question was, I simply replied "Is it true that they taste like chicken?"

She just blinked at me a couple of times, mouth agape, and then moved on to the next person's question.

I was offended. :)

Couldn't help yourself, could you? :proud::proud:

Nearly Normal
2011-04-22, 18:36
I went to Sea World with the family once. They have a manatee exhibit, and the lady tour guide was talking about manatee for about ten minutes. At the end of her spiele, she asked the group if anyone had any questions. After a long awkward pause when everyone was looking around to see who would ask a question, I just slowly raised my hand in the back of the room.

When she asked what my question was, I simply replied "Is it true that they taste like chicken?"

She just blinked at me a couple of times, mouth agape, and then moved on to the next person's question.

I was offended. :)

I did something like that once.
The base fire dept had a meeting with all employees.
It was a cold rainy day and folks drove to the meeting and parked all in front of the station and the meeting was inside.
After the talk, the chief ask if anyone had questions and no one did......so I raised my hand.
I ask if "if the alarm went off right now, how would get the fire trucks out of here with all the cars parked out front".
I got the same look you did and the chief said, "theres always a smartass in the crowd."
I was serious and tried to continue the conversation but it busted it the meeting.

sheepdog
2011-04-22, 22:20
We had a disturbance at one of the prisons I was working at. We were all dressed up and ready to dance, just waiting for the word. One guy says, "I was in the disturbances in 83 a couple others talked about the bad shit they were in. It got quiet for a few minutes and I said, "I went through a really nasty divorce." Most agreed that I won.

Weary
2011-04-22, 22:40
Well. As long as we're into stories about meetings. When the now abandoned nuclear plant was being proposed in a small town a few miles from my home, I noted that all the nuclear plants seem to be located in small towns -- Vermont Yankee, Connecticut Yankee and now Maine Yankee. "Is that to lessen the death toll in case of an accident," I queried. "Or is it perhaps because your company already pays 90 percent of the municipal taxes in this small town, so the nuclear plant will be virtually tax free."

He denied both choices had any validity. But he also refused to recognize me whenever I raised my hand to ask a question for the rest of the meeting.

Gray Blazer
2011-04-25, 08:11
The truth hurts.

General
2011-04-29, 17:10
land is usually cheaper in rural areas. fewer codes and regulations as well.

Weary
2011-04-29, 21:26
land is usually cheaper in rural areas. fewer codes and regulations as well.
True. But those things had nothing to do with choosing a tiny town for nuclear power, at least in Maine. The town that was chosen already had a power plant by the principal owner of the proposed nuclear plant. CMP already paid 90 percent of the costs of running the town. It was a cozy arrangement. Residents loved the power company because it gave them ten-fold lower home taxes than any other community in the state.

The regulations a nuclear plant has to meet are essentially those imposed by state and federal laws, not local laws.

ki0eh
2011-07-07, 14:18
I buy my rough sawn timbers for bog bridges at a one man saw mill located on the Kennebec River a couple of miles up the road from my house.

Back on topic :) how do you like putting together a bog bridge?

Weary
2011-07-07, 15:41
Back on topic :) how do you like putting together a bog bridge?
It's like all trail work. It's a lot of work, but once it's done, it gives one a nice sense of useful accomplishment. Our bog bridges, like most on the AT, are pretty simple. They are fashioned by two 4X6"X8' planks spiked to two shorter cross pieces. I usually drill a hole that's slightly smaller than the spikes to avoid splitting the wood or having the spikes bend over when they are pounded in.

Pressure treated wood lasts longer, but we prefer natural wood that weathers to a natural gray that blends into the wildness without injecting chemicals into the streams. We mostly use hemlock or spruce. Cedar also lasts longer, but the added cost isn't worth the difference -- as long as we can still find volunteers willing to replace them every 10 years or so.

Our land trust bog bridges are relatively easy, compared with those on remote sections of the AT. We buy the rough sawn timbers from a local saw mill. We either drag them to the boggy areas one at a time (they weigh about 60 pounds each) or hire a guy with an ATV to drive them in.

Most planks for bog brdging on the AT -- in Maine at least -- are milled on site from felled trees, using a chainsaw milling device.

Hog On Ice
2011-07-07, 15:52
Do you all put expanded metal or other traction surfaces on the bog bridges? I found this to be rather good technique used on some section of the AT in the South.

Weary
2011-07-07, 16:02
Do you all put expanded metal or other traction surfaces on the bog bridges? I found this to be rather good technique used on some section of the AT in the South.
We don't. But we probably should. Wooden bog bridging can get quite slippery, once molds and fungi take over. If OSHA regulated volunteers, I suspect traction would be mandatory. A woman who hiked with us, the year I walked a nine-year-old through Maine, slipped on a bog bridge and broke her wrist, forcing her to abandon the walk.

DesertReprobate
2011-07-07, 16:31
you eat the bald eagles???

They taste just like passenger pigeon

Hog On Ice
2011-07-07, 17:04
We don't. But we probably should. Wooden bog bridging can get quite slippery, once molds and fungi take over. If OSHA regulated volunteers, I suspect traction would be mandatory. A woman who hiked with us, the year I walked a nine-year-old through Maine, slipped on a bog bridge and broke her wrist, forcing her to abandon the walk.

check with Bob Peoples as to the product they used - I think it was the Tenn.-Eastman club that was doing this technique

ki0eh
2011-07-07, 22:16
Would the slipperiness occur even on rough-sawn vs. planed lumber? I dislike the bog bridging with slippery planed pressure-treated pine that lifts up on stepping on the other end, and ultimately through numerous cycles pulls the nails out of the wood. I was trying rough-sawn white oak 2x12s screwed to 6x6 locust timber crossties this summer, guess in a few years I'll see how those work out. I've seen the Finger Lakes Trail Conference use a really gritty thick industrial safety paint on planed lumber, again a thing to go back to to see how that wears.

Hikerhead
2011-07-07, 22:37
check with Bob Peoples as to the product they used - I think it was the Tenn.-Eastman club that was doing this technique

Plus 1 for HOI. They use some kind of galvanized metal grate and it's the best method I've seen. Long lasting and absolutely skid resistant.