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SGT Rock
2011-05-28, 21:23
Friday I got some help from Dick Evans and Rick Harris getting rid of the bad blow downs. A big thanks to them, especially Rick for the chainsaw work.

http://hikinghq.net/images/venom/blowdown.bmp

This weekend we remember our nations fallen. Salute to all my brothers and sisters - veterans and still serving. :beer:

JoeyB
2011-05-28, 21:41
http://s3.postimage.org/m9qmndjjs/g_iwo_jima.jpg

woodsy
2011-05-29, 12:50
http://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/attachments/photo-critique/63965d1275946108-people-memorial-day-imgp97388-jpg

sheepdog
2011-05-29, 17:50
Thanks to all who have served. :gob_beer

john pickett
2011-05-29, 21:22
Hoist a cold one for me, Brothers.

ed bell
2011-05-29, 22:20
Thanks to all that serve our Nation. I spent years treating it like another three day weekend...years and maturity have provided me with real perspective. God bless our troops.

Big Mac
2011-05-29, 23:03
God bless are service men and women, especially the fallen.

Rifleman
2011-05-29, 23:30
The call for these kinds of sacrifices never ends--whether you are still wearing the uniform or not. Having once taken the oath, are you still prepared to carry it out--no matter the cost?

Superman
2012-05-17, 10:15
Anybody see this?

http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/sabo/

shadowmoss
2012-05-17, 10:29
Yes. I look around me every day and think about how I work with men and women who are the ones who end up in those kinds of situations (ok, not exactly like Viet Nam) and are tested to see what they are made of. It is humbling.

saimyoji
2012-05-17, 10:36
My great grand uncle:

http://www.homeofheroes.com/moh/citations_1940_wwii/walsh_william.html

Tipi Walter
2012-05-17, 11:41
Friday I got some help from Dick Evans and Rick Harris getting rid of the bad blow downs. A big thanks to them, especially Rick for the chainsaw work.

http://hikinghq.net/images/venom/blowdown.bmp

This weekend we remember our nations fallen. Salute to all my brothers and sisters - veterans and still serving. :beer:

Thank you Rock for your service and your bravery overseas. And we're practically next store neighbors. I'm assuming your picture was taken on the section of the BMT you maintain---Ike Branch down to Slickrock. I recently backpacked it and gotta say it was a mess a couple months ago with dead hemlock branches scattered everywhere. We had some nasty storms in the last year which accounts for the crap. I'm glad you teamed up with some of the Crosscut Mountain Boys.

JERMM
2012-05-17, 11:58
Thank you Rock for your service and your bravery overseas. And we're practically next store neighbors. I'm assuming your picture was taken on the section of the BMT you maintain---Ike Branch down to Slickrock. I recently backpacked it and gotta say it was a mess a couple months ago with dead hemlock branches scattered everywhere. We had some nasty storms in the last year which accounts for the crap. I'm glad you teamed up with some of the Crosscut Mountain Boys.


mmmmight want to check the date of when Rock first posted 5-28-2011

I'm guessing the mess is still there unless someone has cleared it recently

SGT Rock
2012-05-17, 12:42
My great grand uncle:

http://www.homeofheroes.com/moh/citations_1940_wwii/walsh_william.html
Truly a reason to be proud.


Thank you Rock for your service and your bravery overseas. And we're practically next store neighbors. I'm assuming your picture was taken on the section of the BMT you maintain---Ike Branch down to Slickrock. I recently backpacked it and gotta say it was a mess a couple months ago with dead hemlock branches scattered everywhere. We had some nasty storms in the last year which accounts for the crap. I'm glad you teamed up with some of the Crosscut Mountain Boys.
I was last up there in March I think. I'm doing a work trip in the Smokys next week and have another planned for sometime early June for my section. I still consider this my section (and it is) but I am also maintenance coordinator for the entire Smokys Walter. If you ain't doing anything you are invited to come along. I'm also inviting some ultralight hammockers to come down to the Skickrock creek campsites area on the weekend of 16-17 June so we can see if some of the non-pack sniffing hammockers have any good ideas. You could come be our foil.

I've forgot to mention that one here Jermm, if you are getting into hammocking and are free that weekend it could be a good place to get some ideas off other hammockers trying to go ultralight.


mmmmight want to check the date of when Rock first posted 5-28-2011

I'm guessing the mess is still there unless someone has cleared it recently

It is probably still there. There are a bunch of hemlocks dying in that area and they tend to drop tops on that section of trail. Last time I went up there that was the majority of the work.

Cuffs
2012-05-17, 13:13
Rock, do you know if SouthMark is going to that ul hammocker thing in June? Im sure he would love to tweak his gear some more! If not, get me the info and I'll forward it to him.

JERMM
2012-05-17, 13:47
Truly a reason to be proud.


I was last up there in March I think. I'm doing a work trip in the Smokys next week and have another planned for sometime early June for my section. I still consider this my section (and it is) but I am also maintenance coordinator for the entire Smokys Walter. If you ain't doing anything you are invited to come along. I'm also inviting some ultralight hammockers to come down to the Skickrock creek campsites area on the weekend of 16-17 June so we can see if some of the non-pack sniffing hammockers have any good ideas. You could come be our foil.

I've forgot to mention that one here Jermm, if you are getting into hammocking and are free that weekend it could be a good place to get some ideas off other hammockers trying to go ultralight.

It is probably still there. There are a bunch of hemlocks dying in that area and they tend to drop tops on that section of trail. Last time I went up there that was the majority of the work.

thanks Rock, can't make it though

SGT Rock
2012-05-17, 14:02
Rock, do you know if SouthMark is going to that ul hammocker thing in June? Im sure he would love to tweak his gear some more! If not, get me the info and I'll forward it to him.I don't think he knows. Here is a link to the announcement

http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=52524

When I get home I'll put an announcment here.

Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk 2

Cuffs
2012-05-17, 14:28
I don't think he knows. Here is a link to the announcement

http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=52524

When I get home I'll put an announcment here.

Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk 2

I think hes out this week to go hike on ME, but I posted the link on his FB.

SGT Rock
2012-05-17, 15:15
Thanks Cuffs.

southmark
2012-05-17, 19:34
Thanks guys. I am heading to ME tomorrow morning for three weeks but will be back in time for this. I got Cuff's message on FB. I would love to attend. And thanks Rock for your service and to everyone who has served past and present.

Law Dawg (ret)
2012-05-17, 20:27
Thanks seems so small when we consider how much we owe our Veterans but it's the best I got here.

Thanks for your service and prayers of thanks for those who gave all.

:top:

Crikey
2012-05-23, 10:07
Memorial Day is not a sale.

SGT Rock
2012-05-23, 20:15
Amen.

This weekend it is for trail maintenance for us. And time to remember.

Hog On Ice
2012-05-23, 20:47
I hope the weather cooperates for you Rock - around here its looking to be rather hot starting on Friday and going for the next 5 days - make sure everyone gets their electrolytes regularly ;-)

SGT Rock
2012-05-23, 20:57
Short days too. Lots of creek cool-offs.

Wonder
2012-05-25, 18:23
Memorial Day is not a sale.

Sadly, if I want to stay in business, it has to be for me. I'd much rather be going to the veterans memorial where my grandfather is buried. I used to go every year and several of us would put a flag at every grave. I'll be busy all weekend, so let me just say my thank yous to ALL who have served in uniform.

Superman
2013-05-26, 10:12
http://www.coachwyatt.com/raynealgribble.htm

I knew Gribble. So many good men died that day.

Superman
2013-05-26, 10:24
What a Difference a Dog Makes

What a difference a dog makes. The 2/28th Infantry fought the battle of Ong Thanh on 17 October 1967. Lt Col Terry Allen took an under strength battalion of only 155 men into the jungle to fight the reinforced VC 271st Regt (about 1400 men). Terry Allen's only concern was to get the VC to stand and fight...god was he wrong. What people don't know is that about a week earlier the 1/18th Infantry was operating in about the same area when the scout dog on point indicated to his handler that there was a very large VC force in front of them. That information was immediately transmitted to Lt Col Cavazos who immediately maneuvered his battalion out of the ambush. Lt Col Terry Allen was warned by Lt Welch who was commanding "D" company which was on point. Lt Welch warned Allen of the very large ambush that they were walking into and Allen moved "D' company to second in the column as an insult to Walsh. Lt Welch earned the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in the Battle of Ong Thanh but was only given the Distinguished Service Cross. Lt Col Terry Allen died in the battle of Ong Thanh.
You may wonder how I know this. I had been in Vietnam over a year at that point and was being used more and more as a Forward Observer (FO). I had been assigned to the 2/28th as their FO for that operation. Two things happened just before that operation. First, Terry Allen objected to me being the FO because he felt that I didn't have enough credentials for the job. The second thing that happened at the same time was "Command and Control" for that operation was switched from the 2nd Brigade to the 3rd Brigade. The 3rd Brigade supplied them with a very top notch Forward Observer named 2nd Lt Durham. Durham received the Congressional Medal of Honor posthumously for his efforts. Sp/4 Ray Gribble and I became friends when the newly assigned G-3 Major Shelton asked me to mentor Gribble when he was selected to be Major Shelton's RTO. Gribble wanted to go back to his squad and Shelton let him return to his unit just before the battle. Gribble and his entire squad died in the battle.
Since I hadn't been assigned a new duty I ate a late breakfast and talked war stories with some NCOs in the 2nd Brigade mess hall. As I was walking away from the mess hall a runner came and got me. I was to saddle up and report to the S-3 (operations)...I was going out. When I got to the TOC they had the radios turned up and they were getting a radio relay of the battle from some place. I was told to stand by. The 2nd Brigade requested...almost begged to be allowed to assume command and control. They had lined up all kinds of assets to rush to the battle but the 3rd Brigade would not stand down. I listened to the gut wrenching battle mostly standing in the doorway of the TOC. The next morning a bunch of us from the 2nd Brigade S-3 went up to Lai Khe and watched what was left of the 2/28th get off the choppers. Only 27 got off the choppers.

Jim Thompson 1st Infantry Division RTO 66-68


Thanks for the question. It means that you gave some thought to what I tried to describe.

The jungle in our area was very dense. In some places you couldn't see someone that was only feet away from you. Companies and battalions moved through the jungle in columns....for the practical reason that it was hard to move through the jungle any other way. The arrangement of the units in the column was initially made in the Operation Plan but the first casualty of every battle is the Operation Plan. The column usually had the strongest company in the lead or point position. The lead company would most likely make contact with the enemy first. The point company had to either fight it out with the enemy or hang on until the other companies could maneuver to flank or reinforce the point company. The 2/28th had just expanded to add the "D" company. That was sort of stupid because the battalion was so under strength. Each company should have about 100 men each. The 2/28th only had about 25 men each. Lt Welch was in his second tour in Vietnam. His first tour was as a Green Beret. That gave him excellent jungle experience and when he was assigned to the 2/28th he was given the recon platoon to command. He quickly showed what a jungle savvy asset he was to the battalion so when Lt Col Terry Allen decided to create a new company he gave it to Lt Welch. When the 2/28th went to the Ong Thanh area Delta Company was first in the column in recognition of Walsh's abilities in combat and in the jungle. I don't think I ever personally talked to Welch but I remember seeing him and noted that he was a person who moved and acted with confidence. He was new to commanding a company and was a bit low key but he was the kind of guy that young troops would have no trouble following in battle. When he tried to warn Terry Allen of the large ambush they were walking into Terry Allen undeservedly told Lt Welch that he was chicken and not up to a fight. He then had "A" company move passed "D" company to take the lead position in the column. When the VC began the ambush "A" company was all but wiped out. I believe that the only "A" company troops that survived were at the rear of the company and merged into "D" company. The VC charged "D" company in waives coming directly through what had been "A" company. Welch begged Terry to call in artillery to blunt the attack but Terry Allen refused. The VC had picked a battle field that favored them. There were parallel little ridges that allowed the VC to move along the length of the column that the American's couldn't see. The 2/28th simply lay on the ground without cover. As the battle progressed it was only the artillery that allowed any of the Americans to survive. Throughout the battle Welch moved his troops, directed their fire and most importantly calmed and steadied his men. During the battle he had his men rescued men of other companies and added them to “D” company.
It was my experience that screwed up operations were screwed up before one foot was placed outside of the basecamp.

shadowmoss
2013-05-26, 11:26
A humble thanks to all who serve, served, and gave the ultimate sacrifice.

sheepdog
2013-05-26, 14:34
wow Superman....just wow

Superman
2013-05-26, 17:44
wow Superman....just wow

I'm so old I remember what the Huey was like before they turbocharged the engine.

sheepdog
2013-05-26, 17:55
I'm so old I remember what the Huey was like before they turbocharged the engine.

and standing in line while the British shot at you?

Superman
2013-05-26, 18:02
and standing in line while the British shot at you?

LMAO, holy bat shit....you're talking like that old geezer Lugnut.

Lugnut
2013-05-26, 18:53
He really did do that. I saw him! :angel:

woodsy
2013-05-26, 19:19
He really did do that. I saw him! :angel:

Some of you fuckahs must be 250 years old by now, ahahaha.

woodsy
2013-05-26, 19:40
I'll be going to the local parade in town tomorrow, like i do every year.

Lugnut
2013-05-26, 20:02
Some of you fuckahs must be 250 years old by now, ahahaha.

I was a drummer boy while Superman was a grumpy old supply sergeant. :albertein

Superman
2013-05-26, 20:07
I was a drummer boy while Superman was a grumpy old supply sergeant. :albertein

I may have been grumpy but I've never been a supply sgt.

Ray
2013-05-27, 02:42
Memorial Day in Gatlinburg / Pigeon Forge brings back memories.

I don't think a lot about my time in service - although I met and married my wife (32.5 years ago) in the Army and learned to bullshit enough to leverage my Army training into getting a job that I've managed to keep for 29.5 years. But every damn live entertainment show in G-burg/PF ends the same way - with that Lee Greenburg "Proud to be an American" song where they first ask all the Army active service & vets to stand up then the rest of the audience to stand on the '....stand up next to you and defend her still today..." verse then the shows all end with a guaranteed standing ovation.

It was just plain cheesy the first time it happened, by the 4th or 5th time the transparent manipulation is just fucking annoying.

I ain't got no war stories like Supe or Rock (thankgahwd) because I only served in the post-Nam cold war. When I enlisted I signed up for "guaranteed European service" and showed up for Basic T with my Sears Whitaker backpack and all the other top-line backpacking equipment available and affordable to broke college students in 1979. Hitched, stole train rides and biked all over Germany and parts of France with that crappy old pack.

So I can't complain about my time in service. Hell, I gained weight in Basic Training. After Germany I landed a cushy assignment to a crime lab then left the Army to spend decades pondering the ins and outs of vaginas. Point being, in 6 years in the Army I never fired live ammo at anything but paper targets. Ain't apologizing. Just sayin'.

And thankgahwd. Right? So no PTSD, no war stories. But still, being reminded once a day does bring back memories.

So there we were, somewhere in the woods of Germany. Just field training, the line platoons were off digging holes or building bridges or blowing up telephone poles substituting as bridge supports or something. Combat Engineer unit, I was the NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical warfare specialist) NCO and could read a map which meant I drove the First Sergeant around in a pickup. When not driving Top I was chilled out on my cot or pulling a shift as the company RTO, being exempt from KP. Tough job but somebody had to do it. And I was probably on my cot catching up on my beauty rest when one of the line platoon's officers burst into the tent yelling for Stern. Oh shit, what'd I do now?

Turns out they'd stumbled across something they thought might be a bomb or old ordinance left from WWII. And I had the company's mine detector and they wanted me to scope out what they'd found. Hell, I'd used it once when I signed for the NBC room just to check that it worked. It was somewhere buried in the supply tent along with all the other crap I had to haul to the field but never used like chemical decontamination powder (bleach) in 35 gallon drums, crates of chemical and radiation detectors, all kinds of shit that nobody would ever use. Again thankgahwd. Right?

Me? Mine detector? You've got to be kidding. Man, I got the Doobie Brothers latest cassette playing on the player I just bought at the PX, can you wait until I listen to the end of the album?

OK so there I am. I'd driven to the platoon's site with the ambulance following. Gee, thanks for that vote of confidence. Mine detector charged with fresh batteries and checked. Kinda looked like a big olive drab green string trimmer with headphones. The LT points out a tree I'm supposed to walk towards. The rest of the platoon falls back, way way back. Like I didn't think they had to fall back that far, did they? Two medics with a stretcher and a couple packs full of medical supplies fall back with them. Always good to have support.

So, the tree. There's something, actually some things, sticking up beneath it. Both round. And shiny. One green, the other brown. Starting far back I creep towards it with the mine detector held way in front of me. So if there's an explosion I want to be that extra 8 inches away from it, y'know? And I'm thinking 'I'm NBC, that ain't EOD' but there also ain't no way I'm wimping out on this with all those eyes on me. Young and stupid, like who hasn't been there?

I get up by the round shiny things and the detector goes off. Oh great, that's just what I was hoping for. Scan the detector all around but it only beeps atop the round shiny green and brown things. So I gently put it aside and crawl up with a fiberglass probe thing and start lifting off leaves one by one. Round shiny things look like glass. They look a lot like glass. Old glass. Clear more duff off and it becomes obvious that they're bottles. Old bottles. More clearing, leaf by leaf and twig by twig and the top of the bottles are uncovered and they have rusted metal gizmos on their necks. It's the brackets that hold on the ceramic pop tops, like Grolsch beer. Enough metal to, say, set off a mine detector.

Obviously old home brew beer bottles some German wood cutters dropped there many years ago. I kept and still got the damn things. Hadn't thought about that incident in years.

But I've got a case of homebrew with me and I'm lifting one to those that aren't here and also to all those who have less fun things to remember about their service. God bless them all.

sheepdog
2013-05-27, 02:55
Good story Ray. hahahahahha

Superman
2013-05-27, 09:22
It was about 3:30 or 4:00AM when we got back from the vigil. There were no new aluminum walkers there this year. When a guy shows up with an aluminum walker he comes to one or two vigils and then you hear that he has passed away. There were three guys walking with canes. Canes are ok so long as they don't get replaced with aluminum walkers. At midnight we read the names of the dead and lit a candle for them. Then we hung out and socialized. We had hot dogs, hamburgers and venison stew. That's when we find out who has passed away and who is struggling. We sound like a bunch of old women the way we go on about our health conditions. The guy that attended representing the Vet Center told us that we are less than one percent of the population and our numbers our dropping like a rock. There were only 600,000 Vietnam combat veterans originally. Over 2/3 of us have already died. My friend Chuck who was a LRRP in the 11th Cav is struggling. He may have an aluminum walker by the next vigil. Chuck recon'd much of the same area that I worked in. ....and so it goes.

Superman
2013-05-27, 17:33
During the summer of 67 after I'd come back from the hospital my tent was directly across the dirt road from the 2/28th. I could watch religious movies for free or I could chip in $2.00 to watch porn and drink some beer with the 11Bs of the 2/28th. They were just regular, young American boys. They played flag football. Actually they played every chance they had. They were strong and fit...and had no problem in serving their country. Yes, Welch didn't get what he deserved but for the rest of the men that hadn't been killed or wounded the brass immediately began dunning them to say that they hadn't been ambushed. For many of them it was the treatment the brass gave them that soured them to the Army, the war and even to this country. During TET of 68 the Black Lions were sent to Hue and sat and watched the backs of the Marines as the Marines fought hard for Hue. It takes a good bit of time to restore a unit that gets kicked in as many ways as the 2/28th Infantry was. I didn't think much of Terry Allen before the Battle of Ong Thahn. I hated him and his arrogance for a lot of years.

Law Dawg (ret)
2013-05-27, 23:01
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rKsW6c_CgFY

Thanks y'all...

Superman
2013-05-28, 12:47
During the summer of 67 after I'd come back from the hospital my tent was directly across the dirt road from the 2/28th. I could watch religious movies for free or I could chip in $2.00 to watch porn and drink some beer with the 11Bs of the 2/28th. They were just regular, young American boys. They played flag football. Actually they played every chance they had. They were strong and fit...and had no problem in serving their country. Yes, Welch didn't get what he deserved but for the rest of the men that hadn't been killed or wounded the brass immediately began dunning them to say that they hadn't been ambushed. For many of them it was the treatment the brass gave them that soured them to the Army, the war and even to this country. During TET of 68 the Black Lions were sent to Hue and sat and watched the backs of the Marines as the Marines fought hard for Hue. It takes a good bit of time to restore a unit that gets kicked in as many ways as the 2/28th Infantry was. I didn't think much of Terry Allen before the Battle of Ong Thahn. I hated him and his arrogance for a lot of years.


This picture was taken in August of 67. Behind me was the 2/28th area. They played football in that open area. August was when they came in country in 1965 so every August there would be a big turnover of personnel. Before August 1967 there were about 16 or 17 guys all from the same town that enlisted together, trained together and served in the Recon Platoon together. They didn't lose a single man. During August the veterans went home and the replacements came in. Even most of the officers and NCOs were FNGs. By October they were still very under strength from attrition, individual medical issues and the flow of replacements had slowed way down due to higher casualties across Vietnam. Attrition consisted of losing guys one and two at a time on an ongoing basis because of booby traps, snipers, bug bites, elephant grass, heat prostration, dehydration, disease and the dreaded "R&R." We were losing about 400 men killed per week. Where an FNG was assigned mattered more when he got there than what his MOS was. I was aware of the losses incurred in our infantry units, artillery, armor and choppers. I never gave much thought to those units that we considered REMFs. We considered the 121st Signal a REMF unit but when Clyde told me about his brother I looked at it closer. I was surprised when I visited the 1st ID memorial in Washington and saw how many men of the 121st Signal had died in the 1st ID.
The infantry is not being an "Army of One." That has always been bull shit. It is the ultimate team sport. There is a synergistic effect of men working together toward a common goal. Being an infantryman is learning a trade. For an infantry officer or NCO it is being a "people person" first. Almost everything you accomplish is by the employment of the skills of other people. As the 2/28th filled with FNGs its effectiveness diminished with its numbers. It take a while for men to get comfortable working together. That was made more difficult by Terry Allen's insults, ass chewings and bazaar personnel changes. Who adds a fourth company to a battalion that is critically under strength? The operations officer was re-assigned as the division G-3 only a couple weeks before October 16th. He was replaced by a man who was less regarded by Terry Allen and thus made him less effective. If I could write an epitaph for Lt Col. Terry Allen it would be "What the fuck were you thinking?"


4989

incognito
2013-11-10, 20:31
I didn't see a thread dedicated to Veteran's Day so this one will do just fine.

I big "Thank You" to all the Veterans that served our country, past and present.

SGT Rock
2013-11-10, 20:37
I'm sure we have a few somewhere, probably old ones. Happy Veterans Day tomorrow for all my brothers and sisters who have served or are still serving.

Superman
2013-11-10, 20:44
:dito:

Tin Man
2013-11-10, 20:52
:dito:

Lugnut
2013-11-10, 21:05
Are we supposed to wish ourselves Happy Veterans Day? :confused:

Tin Man
2013-11-10, 21:08
Are we supposed to wish ourselves Happy Veterans Day? :confused:

no, it's memorial day in november

Lugnut
2013-11-10, 21:19
Well okay. That makes sense.

Tin Man
2013-11-10, 21:38
Well okay. That makes sense.

that's a first...

SGT Rock
2013-11-10, 21:52
My bad. I've been working on my computer and book. Lost track of the time.

Lugnut
2013-11-10, 22:38
Not your fault Rock, Incognito started it!

Superman
2015-05-18, 09:43
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rren9w4ciYM

john pickett
2015-05-18, 10:08
Thanks for that, Supe.

SGT Rock
2015-05-19, 16:29
Riding in Smoky Mountain Thunder Sunday.

saimyoji
2015-05-19, 17:01
Dont let those bikers start any shit.

Superman
2015-05-20, 06:35
http://www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces/29906/JOHN-W-LAWRENCE-JR

Superman
2015-05-20, 13:44
Some light reading:angel:

5826

Superman
2015-05-21, 04:55
Some more light reading. This is what Memorial Day is about. Remembering and honoring those who died. I knew Ray Gribble. I was his mentor. I knew or sort of knew a lot of the guys in the 2/28th Infantry. I'd been on a number of their operations. I was assigned to go on this operation but was told to stand down. Then when the ambush started I was told to suit up because I was going in. I spent the day wearing my web gear and carrying my rifle as I listened to the 2nd Brigade radios at the TOC in Dian. It was horrific to listen to. The 2nd Brigade did everything they could to get back command of the 2/28th from the 3rd Brigade. We had assets to put in as soon as they gave the word. The 2/28th was a 2nd Brigade unit but in Vietnam command and control was fluid. The next day a bunch of us flew up to Lai Khe to see the 2/28th come in from the field. The 2/28th had 27 pairs of boots got off the choppers. Everyone else was killed or wounded.

https://books.google.com/books?id=qftwHKSnmpkC&pg=PA261&lpg=PA261&dq=ray+neal+gribble&source=bl&ots=Ul_BJwj-zh&sig=HgSqywSIspRjCPaKCCXFMQgzxBM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=zItdVezJFs3fgwSjvoCoBQ&ved=0CF0Q6AEwDw#v=onepage&q=ray%20neal%20gribble&f=false

Hog On Ice
2015-05-21, 11:05
a poem from the prefix to Asylum by Jordan Leah Hunter & Owen R. O'Neill:

For Thy Sake---

For thee sake of thee
I stood my ground

For the sake of thee
I bore the sound

Of bullets as they whistled past
And each one sang: All flesh is grass.

Ere long came one that laid me low
And falling as I felt the blow
For thy sake, watched my red blood flow
And lying still---that's all I know.

I had not lived ten thousand days
I might have died a hundred ways
But for thee I chose this price to pay---Go

And bring to me that sacred fire
Set thy torch to my funeral pyre
And even as I burn for thee---Know

Thou hast not seen the last of me.

Superman
2015-05-21, 11:36
My house is the only one in this town that has the South Vietnamese flag on the flag pole in front of the house. That's a yellow flag with three red stripes. Why do I fly that flag. A lot of us invested a lot of ourselves in fighting for that flag. We were fighting against communism. It was made perfectly clear to me by my professors and fellow students when I was in college, after my military service, that I did not fight for America in Vietnam. They claimed I was just an under paid mercenary fighting for my monthly pay. That was weird since we that I served with made a noble fight against communism to allow the Vietnamese to determine their own government. More often than not, when I looked at a flag in Vietnam that was the flag I saw...not the American flag. I will never forget my time in Vietnam or the effort made for the South Vietnamese people. I'm not sorry I served in Vietnam. I'm only sorry that I wasn't able to do more.

Superman
2015-05-22, 08:02
This one is for the coach. Richie used to get in trouble at school. Nothing serious but his dad had to be called. His dad was a East Haven cop who had served as a Marine in WWII. His dad figured Richie needed discipline so he signed Richie up. I was one of Richie's friends. He really was a great kid and the only thing wrong with Richie was he was a normal teenage boy with a cop for a dad. If he hadn't gone to Vietnam or if he'd survived he probably would have been a cop too.
I've run the New Haven Road Race for about 37 years. The night before the race I always go to Tolli's Pizza in East Haven. Tolli's is located right across the street from the house where Richie used to live. Every year I tell whoever I'm with about Richie.


http://www.virtualwall.org/dw/WolcheskiRJ01a.htm

Superman
2015-05-22, 08:49
http://www.virtualwall.org/dp/PlatoszWx01a.htm

Oljm
2015-05-22, 10:48
This one is for the coach. Richie used to get in trouble at school. Nothing serious but his dad had to be called. His dad was a East Haven cop who had served as a Marine in WWII. His dad figured Richie needed discipline so he signed Richie up. I was one of Richie's friends. He really was a great kid and the only thing wrong with Richie was he was a normal teenage boy with a cop for a dad. If he hadn't gone to Vietnam or if he'd survived he probably would have been a cop too.
I've run the New Haven Road Race for about 37 years. The night before the race I always go to Tolli's Pizza in East Haven. Tolli's is located right across the street from the house where Richie used to live. Every year I tell whoever I'm with about Richie.


http://www.virtualwall.org/dw/WolcheskiRJ01a.htm


5828

This lovely young lady is Richies niece.

Walter's daughter.....I think he is still kickin'

Oljm
2015-05-22, 10:49
................and if HB had called me earlier, yesterday, I would have taken him to Tolli's.

Superman
2015-05-22, 11:29
................and if HB had called me earlier, yesterday, I would have taken him to Tolli's.

I think Tolli's is part of the mandatory tour of CT.

Oljm
2015-05-22, 12:42
He keeps telling me that Henry Hudson made the first Apizza in Queens!

Superman
2015-05-22, 12:48
He keeps telling me that Henry Hudson made the first Apizza in Queens!

All people from Long Island are crazy. Just sayin.

hikerboy
2015-05-22, 13:30
................and if HB had called me earlier, yesterday, I would have taken him to Tolli's.

i had to go to mcdermott chevrolet in east haven to pick up a tahoe for a customer yesterday, and drive it back to ny, was fine till i hit the throggs neck bridge, then wall to wall traffic the rest of the way.
hey superman, i told you i would endorse your plan. how soon can we start?

hikerboy
2015-05-22, 13:30
All people from Long Island are crazy. Just sayin.

im proud to be crazy

hikerboy
2015-05-22, 13:31
He keeps telling me that Henry Hudson made the first Apizza in Queens!

aah, but you dont have rays original pizza, original rays pizza, or any of the rays pizzas that are legendary in nyc

Superman
2015-05-22, 13:49
im proud to be crazy

...and everybody should do what they're good at.

hikerboy
2015-05-22, 13:56
...and everybody should do what they're good at.

i do seem to be good at it, don't i?

Oljm
2015-05-22, 14:11
Richie and Walts dad , Walt, retired as the Dog Warden. He lived in 'The Birches' condo, across from my Dads. He is long gone now.

The kid in the picture was Nicholls College Tourney MVP. Good kid, excellent player.

Superman
2015-05-22, 14:47
Richie and Walts dad , Walt, retired as the Dog Warden. He lived in 'The Birches' condo, across from my Dads. He is long gone now.

The kid in the picture was Nicholls College Tourney MVP. Good kid, excellent player.

...and time drifts along. Time is so weird. Some times it's like it all happen yesterday and other times it seems like so long ago.....did it happen at all. A bunch of us used to hang out at Gerrish Ave School. I see they turned it into condos. Some times we hung out at Overbrook School. Now it's Joe Melillo Middle School. Before they re-did the down town area there was a ten pin bowling alley that was popular. Then they made that big pin bowling alley. So did Tommy LaBonte go to jail or become a cop. It seemed like he'd go either way.

Oljm
2015-05-22, 16:47
...and time drifts along. Time is so weird. Some times it's like it all happen yesterday and other times it seems like so long ago.....did it happen at all. A bunch of us used to hang out at Gerrish Ave School. I see they turned it into condos. Some times we hung out at Overbrook School. Now it's Joe Melillo Middle School. Before they re-did the down town area there was a ten pin bowling alley that was popular. Then they made that big pin bowling alley. So did Tommy LaBonte go to jail or become a cop. It seemed like he'd go either way.

I had Mrs. Notargiacoumo for Kindergarten @ Overbrook, and Mrs. Brown for 1st. grade @ Gerrish. I actually married and lived in a house on Gerrish Place, directly behind Tolli's. 2nd grade we moved to Florence Street, in Foxon.
I still think you may know my former father in law....Mike Plaskon, from Roy street. He was a Marine in Viet-nam 65/66. How about John Tomasso from Foxon, USAF?

Superman
2015-05-22, 16:56
I had Mrs. Notargiacoumo for Kindergarten @ Overbrook, and Mrs. Brown for 1st. grade @ Gerrish. I actually married and lived in a house on Gerrish Place, directly behind Tolli's. 2nd grade we moved to Florence Street, in Foxon.
I still think you may know my former father in law....Mike Plaskon, from Roy street. He was a Marine in Viet-nam 65/66. How about John Tomasso from Foxon, USAF?

I might have but they wouldn't have been in my group. The guys my age got to Vietnam 65 to 67. When we got home it took a while to unwind. Those names are familiar but I can't put a face on them. My grandmother lived on Hughes St, we lived on James St and then on Main St next to the Laundromat. Everybody went to Gerrish Ave School. Even my parents went there.

Superman
2015-05-22, 17:46
I had Mrs. Notargiacoumo for Kindergarten @ Overbrook, and Mrs. Brown for 1st. grade @ Gerrish. I actually married and lived in a house on Gerrish Place, directly behind Tolli's. 2nd grade we moved to Florence Street, in Foxon.
I still think you may know my former father in law....Mike Plaskon, from Roy street. He was a Marine in Viet-nam 65/66. How about John Tomasso from Foxon, USAF?

Do you know what ever happened to Joey Gentile. I sat next to him in school when he lost his leg.

Oljm
2015-05-22, 18:25
He must be retired by now, but he was in the grounds keeping dept. with public works. I would see him around town alot. But, I have been in Saybrook now 7 years and work in Branford, so am pretty much out of 'Staven.

Superman
2015-05-22, 18:42
He must be retired by now, but he was in the grounds keeping dept. with public works. I would see him around town alot. But, I have been in Saybrook now 7 years and work in Branford, so am pretty much out of 'Staven.

He was an amazing athlete when he was young. If he hadn't lost his leg who knows how far he would have gone. He was better than most guys while he had only one leg.

Oljm
2015-05-22, 18:47
I have met the man many times. I have heard those stories.

Superman
2015-05-23, 05:58
When I let my mind drift back over the time I was in Vietnam it wasn't all the same...or I wasn't all the same. When I first got there and was made an RTO after being trained to operate heavy equipment I didn't know whether to shit or go blind. That was how I was on Operation Attleboro in 66. Then I got some training and some experience so I was more comfortable with my duties and the flow of operations. That's how I was on Operation Cedar Falls. By operation Junction City I was taking some initiative by calling in assets as needed. I'd lived long enough to become a player. The men I worked for guided me and supported me. The 1st ID was known for loud ass chewings. I'd seen men including bird colonels get their ass chewed. I don't recall ever getting my heels locked and my ass chewed. A 2nd LT tried to one time and Cpt. Lawrence intervened and chewed the LTs ass. Maybe they knew I was just a dumb kid pedaling as fast as I could. I was in two wars. One was before I hiked the Ho Chi Minh Trail and one after I came back. The task Force that I'd been in was gone and I was just a small cog in the 2nd Brigade machine. I had my assignments but it wasn't rushed or chaotic as it had been. I was still involved in coordinating joint operations in the field but I was doing more FO work. The one thing or person that jumps out at me was Lt Col Terry Allen. By then I'd observed many officers. Pretty much all of them knew that the military is the ultimate team sport. Most of their fellow officers and NCOs were professionals that knew their trade. They made their assignments and gave their people room to complete the assignment. All except terry Allen. His daddy had been the CG of the 1st ID in WWII. His shit didn't stink and he was the right hand of god. He often chewed his officers and NCOs out in front of the men. He micro managed and made his men walk on egg shells. It seemed to me his officers and NCOs were more afraid of his ass chewings than they were fighting the VC. I hated him before the Battle of Ong Thanh. In my opinion he killed his own men with his absolute arrogance. He just refused to listen to anyone. I hated him for lots of years but finally let it go because the hate was too heavy to keep carrying. When I got on the plane to come home I was very different than when I got there. I was empowered. I felt like I'd done the most difficult job in the world and had done a good job. I wasn't a baby killer until I got off the plane in Oakland and encountered the welcome home of my country.

Superman
2015-05-24, 11:39
Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

hikerboy
2015-05-24, 17:21
http://theveteranssite.greatergood.com/clickToGive/vet/home?origin=VET_VETFAN_SUPPORTING_CLICK_052115_CTG&utm_source=faceaff&utm_medium=supporting&utm_campaign=ctg&utm_term=20150511

Superman
2015-05-24, 17:44
http://theveteranssite.greatergood.com/clickToGive/vet/home?origin=VET_VETFAN_SUPPORTING_CLICK_052115_CTG&utm_source=faceaff&utm_medium=supporting&utm_campaign=ctg&utm_term=20150511

There is something strange about all these donate sites. They are all looking for money for things our government used to take care of. Whether it be disaster relief or veterans needs we paid taxes to have these things taken care of. Now there is a hundred organizations asking for donations to do this stuff. If the government put out the word that they weren't going to deal with this stuff I didn't get the memo. If our government isn't doing this stuff why didn't we get money off from our tax bill. If the government is still taking care of business then these are just scams that no one is calling what they are.

hikerboy
2015-05-24, 19:48
There is something strange about all these donate sites. They are all looking for money for things our government used to take care of. Whether it be disaster relief or veterans needs we paid taxes to have these things taken care of. Now there is a hundred organizations asking for donations to do this stuff. If the government put out the word that they weren't going to deal with this stuff I didn't get the memo. If our government isn't doing this stuff why didn't we get money off from our tax bill. If the government is still taking care of business then these are just scams that no one is calling what they are.

here's a list of the better ones:

"there are over 27,000 organizations supporting soldiers, veterans, and military families across the country. "

http://www.military-money-matters.com/charities-ratings.html#axzz3b6CKM3Ch

http://greatnonprofits.org/categories/view/veterans

hikerboy
2015-05-24, 19:51
here's a list of the better ones:

http://www.military-money-matters.com/charities-ratings.html#axzz3b6CKM3Ch

this is good reading as well:

http://www.military-money-matters.com/support-files/veterans-charities-ratings.pdf

Superman
2015-05-24, 20:38
Exactly. The WWII service organizations have gotten into comfy relations with the VA and become compromised. On the one hand they are supposed to be advocating for Veterans while they are receiving pay from the VA and other government agencies. When Bill Clinton wanted to cut benefits those WWII service organization walked into a meeting offering a bushel basket full of veteran benefits that got cut. That is why todays veterans are getting a dime on the dollar compared with what WWII vets got. The only caveat was that no WWII benefits get cut. When the government cut out WWII vets who hadn't bothered to get service connected because they all had 100% benefits just for being in the military more than 30 days. Todays vets are being screwed worse that Vietnam vets got. The intentional shell game of disability awards is completely VA made. The VA knows that every layer of systems the veterans have to get passed slows and frustrates the veterans efforts to claim the benefits he earned. The phone system is intentionally useless. The claims information is wrong and or incomplete which results in no award for the veteran when it finally comes. So it goes into the appeal process. They actually count the denials that go into the appeal process as no longer an active disability claim so the claims have been reduced. Inside the VA is the same corrupt Veteran Bureau that it started out as. They never stop....they just switch to the next anti-veteran activity.
Young men go off to war filled with idealism and selflessness. Shit happens and they get shit on by those who claim to be helping.

Superman
2015-05-24, 23:01
We're on our way to the vigil in VT.

john pickett
2015-05-25, 05:50
Drive safely

Superman
2015-05-25, 09:20
We got home at 3:30 AM. We are very encouraged by some young veterans that have joined the vigil. They read the names of the Vermonters who died in the wars since Vietnam. Then a guy read the names of Vietnam Vets who were a part of the vigil but have passed away. That was very sobering.
After the vigil we had a cook out. There was a lot of hooting and hollering, laughing mixed with guys that told personal stories of Vietnam. My son and his family are still here so we left earlier that we would have. My son and grandson slept out in the tent I gave my grand son. I also gave him a new thermarest and hiking sticks. They came in at 8:00 AM. It was all a success last night.

john pickett
2015-05-25, 10:50
Heartlifting.

SGT Rock
2015-05-25, 19:57
Rode yesterday, it was a pretty moving event when the guest speaker asked everyone to look for a vet in the crowd and welcome them home. Hugs everywhere brother to brother. Today I had to work.

Crikey
2015-05-25, 21:36
Field of Honor in Weaverville NC today. Thanks to all who served and continue to serve.

5832

5833

Superman
2016-05-11, 20:07
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rJXqij6UMU

sheepdog
2016-05-12, 07:41
Amen...

Superman
2016-05-17, 10:45
http://www.historynet.com/last-stand-at-lz-hereford.htm

Superman
2016-05-24, 17:00
Col Keith Nightingale


THE SOUND THAT BINDS

Unique to all that served in Vietnam is the UH1H helicopter. It was both devil and angel and it served as both extremely well. Whether a LRRP, US or RVN soldier or civilian, whether, NVA, VC, Allied or civilian, it provided a sound and sense that lives with us all today. It is the one sound that immediately clears the clouds of time and freshens the forgotten images within our mind. It will be the sound track of our last moments on earth. It was a simple machine-a single engine, a single blade and four man crew-yet like the Model T, it transformed us all and performed tasks the engineers and designers never imagined. For soldiers, it was the worst and best of friends but it was the one binding material in a tapestry of a war of many pieces.

The smell was always hot, filled with diesel fumes, sharp drafts accentuated by gritty sand, laterite and anxious vibrations. It always held the spell of the unknown and the anxiety of learning what was next and what might be. It was an unavoidable magnet for the heavily laden soldier who donkey-trotted to its squat shaking shape through the haze and blast of dirt, stepped on the OD skid, turned and dropped his ruck on the cool aluminum deck. Reaching inside with his rifle or machine gun, a soldier would grasp a floor ring with a finger as an extra precaution of physics for those moments when the now airborne bird would break into a sharp turn revealing all ground or all sky to the helpless riders all very mindful of the impeding weight on their backs. The relentless weight of the ruck combined with the stress of varying motion caused fingers and floor rings to bind almost as one. Constant was the vibration, smell of hydraulic fluid, flashes of visionary images and the occasional burst of a ground-fed odor-rotting fish, dank swampy heat, cordite or simply the continuous sinuous currents of Vietnam’s weather-cold and driven mist in the Northern monsoon or the wall of heated humidity in the southern dry season. Blotting it out and shading the effect was the constant sound of the single rotating blade as it ate a piece of the air, struggling to overcome the momentary physics of the weather.

To divert anxiety, a soldier/piece of freight, might reflect on his home away from home. The door gunners were usually calm which was emotionally helpful. Each gun had a C ration fruit can at the ammo box clip entrance to the feed mechanism of the machine gun. The gun had a large circular aiming sight unlike the ground pounder version. That had the advantage of being able to fix on targets from the air considerably further than normal ground acquisition. Pears, Apricots, Apple Sauce or Fruit Cocktail, it all worked. Fruit cans had just the right width to smoothly feed the belt into the gun which was always a good thing. Some gunners carried a large oil can much like old locomotive engineers to squeeze on the barrel to keep it cool. Usually this was accompanied by a large OD towel or a khaki wound pack bandage to allow a rubdown without a burned hand. Under the gunners seat was usually a small dairy-box filled with extra ammo boxes, smoke grenades, water, flare pistol, C rats and a couple of well-worn paperbacks. The gun itself might be attached to the roof of the helicopter with a bungi cord and harness. This allowed the adventurous gunners to unattach the gun from the pintle and fire it manually while standing on the skid with only the thinnest of connectivity to the bird. These were people you wanted near you-particularly on extractions.

The pilots were more mysterious. You only saw parts of them as they labored behind the armored seats. An arm, a helmeted head and the occasional fingered hand as it moved across the dials and switches on the ceiling above. The armored side panels covered their outside legs-an advantage the passenger did not enjoy. Sometimes, a face, shielded behind helmeted sunshades, would turn around to impart a question with a glance or display a sense of anxiety with large white-circled eyes-this was not a welcoming look as the sounds of external issues fought to override the sounds of mechanics in flight. Yet, as a whole, the pilots got you there, took you back and kept you maintained. You never remembered names, if at all you knew them, but you always remembered the ride and the sound.

Behind each pilot seat usually ran a stretch of wire or silk attaching belt. It would have arrayed a variety of handy items for immediate use. Smoke grenades were the bulk of the attachment inventory-most colors and a couple of white phosphorous if a dramatic marking was needed. Sometimes, trip flares or hand grenades would be included depending on the location and mission. Hand grenades were a rare exception as even pilots knew they exploded-not always where intended. It was just a short arm motion for a door gunner to pluck an inventory item off the string, pull the pin and pitch it which was the point of the arrangement. You didn’t want to be in a helicopter when such an act occurred as that usually meant there was an issue. Soldiers don’t like issues that involve them. It usually means a long day or a very short one-neither of which is a good thing.

The bird lifts off in a slow, struggling and shaking manner. Dust clouds obscure any view a soldier may have. Quickly, with a few subtle swings, the bird is above the dust and a cool encompassing wind blows through. Sweat is quickly dried, eyes clear and a thousand feet of altitude show the world below. Colors are muted but objects clear. The rows of wooden hootches, the airfield, local villages, an old B52 strike, the mottled trail left by a Ranchhand spray mission and the open reflective water of a river or lake are crisp in sight. The initial anxiety of the flight or mission recede as the constantly moving and soothing motion picture and soundtrack unfolds. In time, one is aware of the mass of UH1H’s coalescing in a line in front of and behind you. Other strings of birds may be left or right of you-all surging toward some small speck in the front lost to your view. Each is a mirror image of the other-two to three laden soldiers sitting on the edge looking at you and your accompanying passengers all going to the same place with the same sense of anxiety and uncertainty but borne on a similar steed and sound.

In time, one senses the birds coalescing as they approach the objective. Perhaps a furtive glance or sweeping arc of flight reveals the landing zone. Smoke erupts in columns-initially visible as blue grey against the sky. The location is clearly discernible as a trembling spot surrounded by a vast green carpet of flat jungle or a sharp point of a jutting ridge, As the bird gets closer, a soldier can now see the small FAC aircraft working well-below, the sudden sweeping curve of the bombing runs and the small puffs as artillery impacts. A sense of immense loneliness can begin to obscure one’s mind as the world’s greatest theatre raises its curtain. Even closer now, with anxious eyes and short breath, a soldier can make out his destination. The smoke is now the dirty grey black of munitions with only the slightest hint of orange upon ignition. No Hollywood effect is at work. Here, the physics of explosions are clearly evident as pressure and mass over light.

The pilot turns around to give a thumbs up or simply ignores his load as he struggles to maintain position with multiple birds dropping power through smoke swirls, uplifting newly created debris, sparks and flaming ash. The soldiers instinctively grasp their weapons tighter, look furtively between the upcoming ground and the pilot and mentally strain to find some anchor point for the next few seconds of life. If this is the first lift in, the door gunners will be firing rapidly in sweeping motions of the gun but this will be largely unknown and unfelt to the soldiers. They will now be focused on the quickly approaching ground and the point where they might safely exit. Getting out is now very important. Suddenly, the gunners may rapidly point to the ground and shout “GO” or there may just be the jolt of the skids hitting the ground and the soldiers instinctively lurch out of the bird, slam into the ground and focus on the very small part of the world they now can see. The empty birds, under full power, squeeze massive amounts of air and debris down on the exited soldiers blinding them to the smallest view. Very quickly, there is a sudden shroud of silence as the birds retreat into the distance and the soldiers begin their recovery into a cohesive organization losing that sound.

On various occasions and weather dependent, the birds return. Some to provide necessary logistics, some command visits and some medevacs. On the rarest and best of occasions, they arrive to take you home. Always they have the same sweet sound which resonates with every soldier who ever heard it. It is the sound of life, hope for life and what may be. It is a sound that never will be forgotten. It is your and our sound.

Logistics is always a trial. Pilots don’t like it, field soldiers need it and weather is indiscriminate. Log flights also mean mail and a connection to home and where real people live and live real lives. Here is an aberrant aspect of life that only that sound can relieve. Often there is no landing zone or the area is so hot that a pilot’s sense of purpose may become blurred. Ground commander’s beg and plead on the radio for support that is met with equivocations or insoluble issues. Rations are stretched from four to six days, cigarettes become serious barter items and soldiers begin to turn inward. In some cases, perhaps only minutes after landing, fire fights break out. The machine guns begin their carnivorous song. Rifle ammunition and grenades are expended with gargantuan appetites. The air is filled with an all-encompassing sound that shuts each soldier into his own small world-shooting, loading, shooting, loading, shooting, loading until he has to quickly reach into the depth of his ruck, past the extra rations, past the extra rain poncho, past the spare paperback, to the eight M16 magazines forming the bottom of the load-never thought he would need them. A resupply is desperately needed. In some time, a sound is heard over the din of battle. A steady whomp whomp whomp that says; The World is here. Help is on the way. Hang in there. The soldier turns back to the business at hand with a renewed confidence. Wind parts the canopy and things begin to crash through the tree tops. Some cases have smoke grenades attached-these are the really important stuff-medical supplies, codes and maybe mail. The sound drifts off in the distance and things are better for the moment. The sound brings both a psychological and a material relief.

Wounds are hard to manage. The body is all soft flesh, integrated parts and an emotional burden for those that have to watch its deterioration. If the body is an engine, blood is the gasoline.-when it runs out, so does life. Its important the parts get quickly fixed and the blood is restored to a useful level. If not, the soldier becomes another piece of battlefield detritus. A field medic has the ability to stop external blood flow-less internal. He can replace blood with fluid but its not blood. He can treat for shock but he can’t always stop it. He is at the mercy of his ability and the nature of the wound. Bright red is surface bleeding he can manage but dark red, almost tar-colored, is deep, visceral and beyond his ability to manage. Dark is the essence of the casualties interior. He needs the help that only that sound can bring. If an LZ exists, its wonderful and easy. If not, difficult options remain. The bird weaves back and forth above the canopy as the pilot struggles to find the location of the casualty. He begins a steady hover as he lowers the litter on a cable. The gunner or helo medic looks down at the small figures below and tries to wiggle the litter and cable through the tall canopy to the small upreaching figures below. In time, the litter is filled and the cable retreats -the helo crew still carefully managing the cable as it wends skyward. The cable hits its anchor, the litter is pulled in and the pilot pulls pitch and quickly disappears-but the retreating sound is heard by all and the silent universal thought-There but for the Grace of God go I-and it will be to that sound.

Cutting a landing zone is a standard soldier task. Often, to hear the helicopter’s song, the impossible becomes a requirement and miracles abound. Sweat-filled eyes, blood blistered hands, energy-expended and with a breath of desperation and desire, soldiers attack a small space to carve out sufficient open air for the helicopter to land. Land to bring in what’s needed, take out what’s not and to remind them that someone out there cares. Perhaps some explosives are used-usually for the bigger trees but most often its soldiers and machetes or the side of an e-tool. Done under the pressure of an encroaching enemy, it’s a combination of high adrenalin rush and simple dumb luck-small bullet, big space. In time, an opening is made and the sky revealed. A sound encroaches before a vision. Eyes turn toward the newly created void and the bird appears. The blade tips seem so much larger than the newly-columned sky. Volumes of dirt, grass, leaves and twigs sweep upward and are then driven fiercely downward through the blades as the pilot struggles to do a completely vertical descent through the narrow column he has been provided. Below, the soldiers both cower and revel in the free-flowing air. The trash is blinding but the moving air feels so great. Somehow, the pilot lands in a space that seems smaller than his blade radius. In reverse, the sound builds and then recedes into the distance-always that sound. Bringing and taking away.

Extraction is an emotional highlight of any soldier’s journey. Regardless of the austerity and issues of the home base, for that moment, it is a highly desired location and the focus of thought. It will be provided by that familiar vehicle of sound. The Pickup Zone in the bush is relatively open or if on an established firebase or hilltop position, a marked fixed location. The soldiers awaiting extraction, close to the location undertake their assigned duties-security, formation alignment or LZ marking. Each is focused on the task at hand and tends to blot out other issues. As each soldier senses his moment of removal is about to arrive, his auditory sense becomes keen and his visceral instinct searches for that single sweet song that only one instrument can play. When registered, his eyes look up and he sees what his mind has imaged. He focuses on the sound and the sight and both become larger as they fill his body. He quickly steps unto the skid and up into the aluminum cocoon. Turning outward now, he grasps his weapon with one hand and with the other holds the cargo ring on the floor-as he did when he first arrived at this location. Reversing the flow of travel, he approaches what he temporarily calls home. Landing again in a swirl of dust, diesel and grinding sand, he offloads and trudges toward his assembly point. The sounds retreat in his ears but he knows he will hear them again. He always will.

Tin Man
2016-05-24, 17:03
I'll wait for the cliff notes version...

rcli4
2016-05-25, 00:37
I'll wait for the cliff notes version...

The Huey made a distinct sound. Everyone that ever heard it when you needed it, never forgets the sound or the feel of it swinging into a banking maneuver. Take the time to read it. We had to live it. When Supe post this kinda stuff, take the time to read it and give a reasoned response. You owe him that much.

D'Artagnan
2016-05-25, 13:35
I have a Masonic brother who flew helos in Vietnam.

shadowmoss
2016-05-25, 14:27
It took me awhile to realize just who I was working with when I did support for the 150th. They flew the birds. They did it well, from what I saw.

Superman
2016-05-26, 01:09
When I first got there they were still using some old slow UH1B and Cs. They were so slow and could barely lift themselves. The UH1-D,E,F and Gs followed while I was there. The original UH1s were not turbo charged. A crew chief that was a gear head back on the block added a turbo charger to his chopper. It immediately caused those that could be retro-fitted to become turbo charged. All new models were turbo charged. Each new model was better than the previous model. So yeah but what's the point. Many years latter I was tell a young man that I was hiking with on the AT about the time I was part of the rear guard. Our unit was being extracted as quickly as possible. Our unit was being collapsed as we tried to move away from the vastly superior VC unit. There was one chopper lift that could be made before the VC were on us. We were passed the open area and an opening in the jungle that was just big enough for the chopper to drop down to us. We piled on and quickly realized the chopper didn't have enough lift to raise straight up out of the jungle. Anyone stayed behind had no chance. The pilot began a wild spinning gyration in place. He was throwing leaves and branches every which way. Then all of a sudden we just popped straight up and we all made it. The young man I was telling this to called bull shit. So we left the diner in Poughkeepsie, New York and began hitching a ride back to the AT. A guy driving an SUV stopped and gave us a ride. By chance the guy that gave us the ride had been a chopper pilot in Vietnam. My young hiking friend retold my story and wanted to know it that could happen. The pilot patiently explained how you accumulate lift with a helicopter and that what I described could very well have happened. I hate when one of my truer stories is questioned. :)

D'Artagnan
2016-05-26, 10:00
A helicopter is an amazing thing in the hands of an experienced pilot.

saimyoji
2016-05-26, 10:31
When I first got there they were still using some old slow UH1B and Cs. They were so slow and could barely lift themselves. The UH1-D,E,F and Gs followed while I was there. The original UH1s were not turbo charged. A crew chief that was a gear head back on the block added a turbo charger to his chopper. It immediately caused those that could be retro-fitted to become turbo charged. All new models were turbo charged. Each new model was better than the previous model. So yeah but what's the point. Many years latter I was tell a young man that I was hiking with on the AT about the time I was part of the rear guard. Our unit was being extracted as quickly as possible. Our unit was being collapsed as we tried to move away from the vastly superior VC unit. There was one chopper lift that could be made before the VC were on us. We were passed the open area and an opening in the jungle that was just big enough for the chopper to drop down to us. We piled on and quickly realized the chopper didn't have enough lift to raise straight up out of the jungle. Anyone stayed behind had no chance. The pilot began a wild spinning gyration in place. He was throwing leaves and branches every which way. Then all of a sudden we just popped straight up and we all made it. The young man I was telling this to called bull shit. So we left the diner in Poughkeepsie, New York and began hitching a ride back to the AT. A guy driving an SUV stopped and gave us a ride. By chance the guy that gave us the ride had been a chopper pilot in Vietnam. My young hiking friend retold my story and wanted to know it that could happen. The pilot patiently explained how you accumulate lift with a helicopter and that what I described could very well have happened. I hate when one of my truer stories is questioned. :)

I call BS. : 0)

Superman
2016-05-26, 10:38
A helicopter is an amazing thing in the hands of an experienced pilot.

Those pilots of the 65-66 era invented the Vietnam air war. They did stuff that wasn't in any manuals. Do's and don'ts were passed along verbally. Hell, it wasn't just the air war. The infantry was also trying to figure out how to fight that war. In a base camps NCOs would swap things to watch out for...do's and don'ts. I would sit in on those conversations every chance I got.

sheepdog
2016-05-26, 10:49
Those pilots of the 65-66 era invented the Vietnam air war. They did stuff that wasn't in any manuals. Do's and don'ts were passed along verbally. Hell, it wasn't just the air war. The infantry was also trying to figure out how to fight that war. In a base camps NCOs would swap things to watch out for...do's and don'ts. I would sit in on those conversations every chance I got.

Change your socks and don't do anything stupid that will get yourself killed. Lt Dan

Superman
2016-05-26, 10:51
I call BS. : 0)

Ya know people never wanted to hear anything about Vietnam. That hasn't changed much. Folks got their miss-information from the media, teachers, etc and any time someone says something inconsistent with that they prefer to hold on to their miss-information. The fact is that it didn't matter back in the day and it matters less today. It really doesn't matter. I speak of those olden days because if I don't it just goes around in my head. Venting it works for me. Winter used to look at me as if to say "Oh shit...another anecdote." Daisy helped me write them down to purge myself of them but more just keep on coming. It was important to write them down because it's extremely irksome to me if I miss-tell an event. It's important to say it right and as I age it is more important than ever to say it right. Unfortunately I'm never sure if I'm creating the correct vision of the event to those who weren't there. So the bottom line is that it never mattered but it still matters to say it right. Glad I cleared that up.

shadowmoss
2016-05-26, 11:24
Keep writing, I'll keep reading.

Superman
2016-05-26, 20:20
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzK8lJ0ZbAU#t=98

Spogatz
2016-05-27, 15:44
I worked on UH-1N's with 1stSOW 834AGS Hurlbert Fld, Fla back in the early 80's. I always loved the sound of that bird when it cut the air.

Superman
2016-05-27, 16:11
I worked on UH-1N's with 1stSOW 834AGS Hurlbert Fld, Fla back in the early 80's. I always loved the sound of that bird when it cut the air.

Wow, the N series must have been nice. When I got to Vietnam the armor protection for the pilots were not in most of them Without turbo chargers in those smaller engines made them wicked slow. A 7.62 round easily passed through the floor into the wiring harness overhead. That always seemed like an issue to me. The UH1 was an amazing machine that served us well. I got an air medal for combat air assaults all in UH1s. One month I made 30 air assaults. I don't know if infantry still get air medals. Back in Vietnam you had to be onboard for the completion of the choppers mission. I would like to see how they developed the UH1.

woodsy
2016-05-30, 20:24
Memorial day here in Farmington has become a pitiful showing of support for our lost, killed or missing in action servicemen.
In a town of 8000 people only about 50 people showed up today for the memorial day parade.
People seem to have forgotten those who sacrificed all for the freedom that they enjoy today.
That is all.

Superman
2016-05-30, 21:14
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN21OvVROoo

Superman
2016-05-30, 21:21
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-ZCvBct6lA

Superman
2016-06-03, 13:24
Trivia..............At West Point there is a large boulder next to the path that the cadets walk to and from classes. Actually there are a number of boulders that have plaques mounted in them. 1861 graduates by far lost more class member to the civil war also 1961 graduates by far lost more class member to the Vietnam War. One of my operation officers is listed with the class of 1961.

Superman
2017-05-26, 17:17
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=152&v=eEs4ke7cdNQ

john pickett
2017-05-27, 18:22
Thank you

toecutter1978
2017-05-27, 21:43
Thank you to all my fallen brother and sisters.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

JERMM
2017-05-28, 22:14
Thank you to all of our service men and women.

Roche
2017-05-29, 07:32
Always revered and never forgotten.

Happy Memorial Day.

sheepdog
2017-05-29, 07:46
Always revered and never forgotten.

Happy Memorial Day.

Amen!

Superman
2017-05-29, 10:17
The vigil last night was good in that there were many new faces that included young vets. It was the biggest turn out that we've had in years. My good friend that was a LRRP recon in my TAOR was there this year but he is using a walker. Other old vets are using canes. We had a cook out after the vigil and we found that some of the guys that haven't been able to come just can't physically be out that late and in the dark. These are the guys that fought a war a long time ago. Daisy wore her dad's Navy butt sniffing hat. I love to see how she has become aware and comfortable with the old vet issues. I had lost track of how long we've been doing the vigil.....it's been 36 years. After they read the names of the Vermonters that died in Vietnam one of the young vets read the names of the Vermonters that have died in the wars since Vietnam. After those names are read folks can place a lighted candle on the wall in the name of someone they lost in the wars. At the cook out you can hear funny stories and some anecdotes that aren't so funny. Some of them mostly truer stories of days of yore. At this point... all the old vets know where the others were and the things they've done. Stories are responded to with a nod as the stories drift into the night. ....and so it goes.


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