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IAN
2003-07-02, 20:46
Does anyone have any input?

I'm thinking of buying a pair. But I'm not sure if they will hold up.
Or if they are as waterproof as they say.

INTREPID
2003-07-02, 20:59
I USED A SET OF FROGG TOGGS ON A 3 DAY HIKE. IT RAINED FOR ONE FULL DAY. THEY WERE LIGHT AND WATERPROOF. HOWEVER, THEY DID NOT HOLD UP VERY WELL. I SAT ON A LOG AND MOVED AROUND SLIGHTLY. THE TOGGS WORE TO THE POINT OF LOOSING THEIR ABILITY TO REPEL WATER. I RETURNED THEM TO THE MANUFACTURER. THEY REFUNDED ALL MY MONEY. I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND THEM FOR TRAIL USE. HOPE THIS HELPS.

INTREPID

IAN
2003-07-02, 21:13
Thank you for the input and saving me about $70. The rain jacket I have works fine, Why fix whats not broke?

youngblood
2003-07-03, 12:00
Some people are harder on gear than others, I have used the same set of Frogg Toggs for several years and think they have done well for my requirements. They are cheap, waterproof/very breathable and very light weight. They are not what I would use for 'rough' wear as they are not suitable for situations where you need resistance to abrasions...I wouldn't use them for tree climbing, rock climbing or bushwacking. However, they are not delicate either, I have sat on rocks/logs with them and brushed trees, etc and they are still usable. I also am careful around flames, I don't know about their flame resistance, but I treat them as if they will burn/melt. Are they perfect in every way for backpacking? No, but I like them and only have a few minor complaints. The back of the jacket rides up when I bend over, there are no pockets, dry leaves/pine needles tend to attach to the material and velcro 'hooks' stick very well to the material-- these I learn to deal with because they are cheap, waterproof/very breathable and very light weight. BTW, I have carried these on over 2500 trail miles and have no idea how many times/miles/hours that I have worn them but they 'show their age' and look like they might need to be replaced...maybe not just yet, but soon, I think I'll see if I can get a few more miles on them.

Youngblood

Two Speed
2003-08-08, 19:03
I also have been considering something along the lines of Frogg Toggs. While wandering around a local Home Depot, I spotted a set of overalls made of Tyvek; intended for painting. For $10, I really am thinking of giving the things a shot. However, I am beginning to suspect I may have a screw loose. Opinions? (On the overall idea, I mean :D )

john pickett
2003-08-08, 19:39
Two Speed,
i usae a tyvek Homewrap tarp and it has kept me comfortably dry in some heavy downpours. The tyvek is also strong enough to tie to a tree with a sheetbend knot with no sign of weakening. I'd say for ten bucks, take them home and stand in the shower. let us know what you find. Ok?
John Pickett

Robcat
2004-02-19, 01:47
Sup guys?
I too have made a tyvek tarp,(henry shires style w/o bugnet)and it's held up just fine in the wind and rain. (Didn't leak a drop, but a beak would have been nice) It's still a little too rattly in a good stiff wind for my taste, even though I washed it in a commerical dishwasher twice. Anyway, I was talking to a customer @ the bar a few months ago, about using tyvek coveralls for raingear. He told me that there's a few differant grades of tyvek, and the stuff they make the coveralls from is lighter and less waterproof. They are made for professional painters and such who have to wear them all day long, so they have to be breatheable. It doesn't seem like they would make great raingear, but I could be wrong. I think if they worked great we would have heard about it long before now, and would all be using them. I carry a columbia rainsuit right now, but am considering going to a ID sil-poncho maybe next year. I am a little worried about getting my legs/pants wet, but I've heard of people using tyvek (homewrap) rain chaps, I can't think of why they wouldn't work...
Robcat

jack daniels
2004-02-23, 22:28
I have a set of Frogg Toggs that I used for two very wet weeks on the A.T. last Spring. I found them to be very servicable for their intended purpose and have used them a lot in many rainy situations since. For the price I don't think they are beatable.

The shortcomings Youngblood mentioned are all valid but my wife didn't stay any drier than I did in her pricey Marmot rain suit. I did like all the extra (read expensive and weighty) features of her gear but plan to stick with my Frogg Toggs jacket again this spring on our next section hike. I'll leave the pants home this time as I found I got wetter from sweat than the rain with the pants on even though the weather was pretty cool. When we got moving I didn't have to worry about being cold.

As for my legs getting wet, I just wore shorts or fast drying Ex Officio pants with zip-off legs (if it was too cold) and didn't find wet legs to be a problem -- but, while it WAS wet a lot of the time, I didn't have to hike through any torrential downpours either.

Sgathak
2004-05-17, 00:13
I carry a lightweight shell set made of Pertex. Its not waterproof, but its very breathable, and dries exceptionally fast. What I do with the Frogg Toggs jacket (and Im sure it would work with the pants as well, just havent tried it) if it looks like I might need be putting a little more stress than usual on them, is to put them BETWEEN my Shell and Smartwool T-Shirt. Ive noticed no difference in breathability between wearing the shell on the inside or outside on the Toggs, the shell is more durable, and after setting up camp I can shake out the jacket and toggs, hang them up, and be perfectly happy in my dry t-shirt while brewing up some tea and eatting some moosegoo cookies.

If I have to get going quickly for whatever reason - the shell will be comfortable to wear in a 1/4 of an hour and will be dry within a hour thanks to my body heat... and the Toggs have had very limited exposure to any trail rough.

glee
2005-01-09, 10:06
Anybody have a pair and what is your experience with the product?

Iceman
2005-01-09, 12:45
glee, I have a few pairs of these same type of suits (I think made by stearns, bought during a Wallmart blow out sale for really cheap like 5$ each piece, hence the multiple suits I have for my wife and myself) and find they work fine except for the abraisions mentioned above about other similar products. I recently wore a pair mushroom picking here in the Northwest and put a couple of snag holes in them. I ended up doing some serious brush busting looking to fill my bucket, and did get a couple of holes. But if you plan to pack em for an occasional "minor- downpour" (oxymoron) they will work fine. The bummer is the lack of features you find on them. I really love the zip vents, storm flap, (heavier) "goretexy" type gear. (I am not an ultra light fanatic on raingear but more of an traditionalist here, probably from my locale, out here in the rainforest.) Keep an eye on Wallmart clearance areas after the spring and find a cheapo set to try out, you can't beat the price. Good luck and stay dry!

Major Slacker
2005-02-08, 00:24
I also have been considering something along the lines of Frogg Toggs. While wandering around a local Home Depot, I spotted a set of overalls made of Tyvek; intended for painting. For $10, I really am thinking of giving the things a shot. However, I am beginning to suspect I may have a screw loose. Opinions? (On the overall idea, I mean :D )
I have those Tyvek overalls. They're flimsy and not very waterproof. When they didn't work out for rain gear I tried using them as a VBL. They worked great until I had to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night. Think about wrestling the top half of one layer out from under two or three other layers while the temperature is plummeting and pressure is building, if you know what I mean.

Oh, I forgot to mention that you look like a hazardous waste emergency worker if you wear them on the outside of your clothes.