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bloffy13
2012-01-06, 08:57
G'day all,
Just wanted to share with you a new light(ER) cook kit I have developed (and still working on).
It consists of a fruit container which holds 1 litre (32ish ounces) an alfoil lid, an alfoil windshield , a cake tin cookpot, a stove from a small tin and some fibreglass insulation, a pot stand and a fuel bottle.
Water bottle 67g, lid 9g, windshield 4g, cookpot 103g, stove 56g, stand 9g, 100ml fuel bottle 16g, coming to a grand total of 264g.
Compare that with my old setup of a cups canteen 282g, stove 80g, water bottle 152g and lid 7g (a total of 521g). That's a huge weight saving. I opted for square kit as it fits well into pouches I have. The only problem I have is a little leak in the cake tin and you have to seal the container pretty tight to prevent leakage. I'm working on both issues.
I got water hot enough for a coffee with about 30ml of methylated spirits, which was ok and it took about 5 mins to heat. Might have to work on that.
The first picture is my old kit.
The second picture is the kit packed up.
The third picture is the stove set up with the windshield in place and the lid on.
The fourth picture is of the stove set up with the pot stand and windshield in place, the water container and fuel bottle behind.
The fifth picture is of the kit unpacked.
Cheers
Bloffy

SGT Rock
2012-01-06, 09:36
That is a pretty impressive little kit.

Hog On Ice
2012-01-06, 09:42
have you considered using a beer can instead of the cake tin for the pot?

also a tea light candle tin for the burner and some hardware cloth for the pot support?

sheepdog
2012-01-06, 09:43
looks like an excellent way to get a square meal.

Hog On Ice
2012-01-06, 09:49
-1 to sheepdog for bad pun

bloffy13
2012-01-06, 10:32
Sheepdog, that's funny. Hog on Ice. Where do you get 4 inch wide square beer can? Thanks Sarge, it's not ultra lite but it's better than what I had before. I will still use it when weight is not an issue. Maybe I can use it with gas. I could probably use it with a hexamine tablet (esbit?) as well.
Cheers
Bloffy

sheepdog
2012-01-06, 11:00
blofffy13. I love making gear. Home made gear is the most satisfying to use. It looks like you made a nice kit.

SGT Rock
2012-01-06, 12:22
You might try JB weld to fix that leak.

generoll
2012-01-06, 16:47
what kind of a lid did the large box come with? any reason for changing it?

bloffy13
2012-01-08, 11:20
Generoll,
It is a 4 inch square cake tin, which did not come with a lid but now I know it works I will keep my out for either a lid by itself or an appropriate tin.
Sarge, is JB Weld heat resistant and, more a question to myself, I wonder if you can get it in Australia. I'm assuming so and hope it doesn't contain lead etc. My memory is shot already so wouldn't want any lead to speed up the process :biggrin: .
Just a question from left field. Why is everything cook related round, tins, billies, cook pots etc? Square is so much better for stacking and interlocking stuff :confused2:confused2 hmmm. curiouser and curiouser.
Cheers Bloffy13

Hog On Ice
2012-01-08, 11:26
per JB Weld's website it is not available in Aus. - see: http://jbweld.net/dealer/index.php

Ray
2012-01-08, 14:32
per JB Weld's website it is not available in Aus. - see: http://jbweld.net/dealer/index.phpIs Spam?

Hog On Ice
2012-01-08, 15:10
good question but those cans are not square either

Kanga
2012-01-08, 15:33
on from left field. Why is everything cook related round, tins, billies, cook pots etc? Square is so much better for stacking and interlocking stuff :confused2:confused2 hmmm. curiouser and curiouser.
Cheers Bloffy13

because it's much easier to clean in the field.

bloffy13
2012-01-08, 21:09
mmm cleaning in the field makes sense. probably to do with ease of manufacture. Square is probably harder to make. As for the JB Weld, I'm sure there's something similar available over here. My very patient but long suffering hardware man will roll his eyes, disappear down some obscure aisle and come up with something, I'm sure.
Cheers Bloffy

bloffy13
2012-01-13, 04:56
Bit of an update,
Found a 4inch square tin with a lid which is six inches tall. Thanks Generoll for the idea :albertein: (and to ensure my never ending quest for the perfect cook tin never ends).
Anywho, it was bright pink with purple circles, which: 1. was a bit poofy (sorry if that's not PC), and: 2. would have been a bit nauseating looking at first thing in the morning, especially after few rums the previous night. :beerglass lol. So I scratched it up and gave it a coat of green blackboard paint that I had in the shed. Much better.
It's drying at the moment but once it is, I'll fire it up and see how it goes.
Being that bit deeper, it fits the 1 litre water container nicely, has room for my wind shield, a Chux wipe, and my lighter, with the lid on and just fits nicely in the pouches I use.
I'm thinking I could use the lid as the world's second smallest fry pan :egg: , with perhaps a small piece of alfoil laid over so I don't have to wash up, and use my pocket knife pliers to lift it on and off. Might be able to use it as a plate too. Will have to try it out some time.
I'm heading out this weekend for a 30km (18.6 mile) coastal hike over three days tomorrow so I will have a bit of time to play. Might put some pix up if my ugly mug doesn't break the camera. puke:
Gonna be hammock camping :hammock: in about 29C (84F) max, and 17C (62F) minimum. Will be quite sticky too as a storm is likely. Should be fun I think. Good chance to field test it all. Also going to be trying out some other gear I either haven't used for a while or I haven't used together as a kit. Its light but not ultralight (yet).
Enough waffle. Feed back after weekend.
Cheers
Bloffy

bloffy13
2012-01-13, 08:14
OK. An update on my update.
By luck it was a bacon and egg roll for dinner. (Reasonably warm today and My Dear Beloved did not feel like cooking).
So I took the chance to cook an egg on baking paper and bacon on alfoil.
Both worked well. Cooked the egg as quick as My Dear Beloved did the rest and the bacon quicker. Used 10ml (0.03 ounce - that doesn't sound quite right) for each. Then another 10ml to boil a cup of water. All up pretty good I think.
It is only thin tin plate so I don't know about its longevity but otherwise I think this is a winner. This weekend will tell.
Next time I will use alfoil for both, as the edges of the baking paper burnt off, which was expected but it was a trial.
Cheers
Bloffy

bloffy13
2012-01-16, 09:10
Now for an update on my updated update. (I think that is where I am up to :confused:) Took my kit out for the weekend and it worked a treat. :biggrin:
Did a bit of backwoods cooking on Saturday night, with marinaded steak, carrots, mushroom, onion and potato wrapped in foil and cooked in the coals. Boy, did that taste good. :adore:
Hiked in to a place called Waychinicup National Park on Sunday in hot conditions. Delightful location. Set up my hammock :hammock: and cooked lunch (boil in the bag Baked Beans) on my Smiggles stove, as I have dubbed it. :eating:
Smiggles is a chain of stationary stores here in Australia. The knick knack tin is from there.
Food was hot, coffee went down well and all hot in less than 5 minutes.
Had a couple of other coffees throughout the day and, despite a strong wind and a bit of rain, it worked well in all field tests.
Dinner was another boil in the bag - BBQ Chicken - with powdered onion and mashed potato, washed down with more coffee followed by a mushy concoction of Milo ( a chocolate-type drink), muesli, condensed milk and a little hot water. Sounds disgusting but it goes down a treat.
Breakfast Monday was pretty much a repeat of Sunday in windy, gusty conditions after overnight rain.
I used about 70ml (2-3 ounces) of methylated spirits for the weekend. I could have used a bit more to boil the coffees but I prefer it hot not scalded so it was fine. :coffee:
Overall I totally rate this set up. For simple fare and boil in the bag type stuff, it was ideal. Relatively quick, self contained, simple to use, easy to set up and pack away, reliable, economical, cheap. What more could you want? :congrats:
Enough waffle,
Better start cleaning my kit up ready for next time.
Cheers :ciao:
Bloffy

SGT Rock
2012-01-16, 10:36
Sounds like an excellent trip.

Crikey
2012-01-16, 11:27
That Milo is good stuff. We went through jars of it climbing Kilimanjaro.

sheepdog
2012-01-16, 21:16
Dear Bloffy13,
Never let your wife know you can cook. It can only turn out badly. You may be able to mitigate the damage by telling her to clean up the place and go make you a sammich.
Regards
Sheepdog

Skidsteer
2012-01-16, 22:11
You Duke boys be careful out there, ya hear?

Superman
2012-01-16, 22:18
Dear Bloffy13,
Never let your wife know you can cook. It can only turn out badly. You may be able to mitigate the damage by telling her to clean up the place and go make you a sammich.
Regards
Sheepdog

True dat

bloffy13
2012-01-17, 11:04
I've managed to keep it a secret this long. reckon I will be able to do so for a bit longer. lol. Thanks all for great feedback.
Cheers Bloffy

Rosaleen
2012-01-17, 12:05
I will let you guys in on a little secret. I never knew my hubby could cook, either. About 20 years into our marriage, he was a BSA Scoutmaster and showed the kids how to stir-fry, grill meats, etc. Not long after the shock of that wore off, I also realized if he ever cooked at home, he made a huge mess that *I* got stuck cleaning up. He either made things worse or damaged items. (Aluminum pressure cookers do NOT like automatic dish washer detergent, for example.) For the most part, it is a lot easier to do the cooking and cleaning myself, and let him "prepare supper" by making reservations or bringing home take out!

Not suggesting this, just sharing his secret.

Rosaleen

SGT Rock
2012-01-17, 12:08
All you have to do is screw up about 2 Teflon frying pans in my experience.

Superman
2012-01-17, 12:13
I will let you guys in on a little secret. I never knew my hubby could cook, either. About 20 years into our marriage, he was a BSA Scoutmaster and showed the kids how to stir-fry, grill meats, etc. Not long after the shock of that wore off, I also realized if he ever cooked at home, he made a huge mess that *I* got stuck cleaning up. He either made things worse or damaged items. (Aluminum pressure cookers do NOT like automatic dish washer detergent, for example.) For the most part, it is a lot easier to do the cooking and cleaning myself, and let him "prepare supper" by making reservations or bringing home take out!

Not suggesting this, just sharing his secret.

Rosaleen

Bless his heart.:angel:

Rosaleen
2012-01-17, 14:45
Come to think of it, my neice used this tactic. She is a brilliant,beautiful blue-eyed blonde and an attorney. NO practical sense. As a teen, she ruined a pan or two belonging to my sister and was banned from the kitchen...

I, on the other hand, am welcome in most ranges, wood shops and garages. I'm just weird...

Rosaleen

Superman
2012-01-17, 15:11
Come to think of it, my neice used this tactic. She is a brilliant,beautiful blue-eyed blonde and an attorney. NO practical sense. As a teen, she ruined a pan or two belonging to my sister and was banned from the kitchen...

I, on the other hand, am welcome in most ranges, wood shops and garages. I'm just weird...

Rosaleen

Another way of saying it is "so long as your wheelbarrow is right side up people will keep putting stuff in it.":angel:

sheepdog
2012-01-17, 19:57
Another way of saying it is "so long as your wheelbarrow is right side up people will keep putting stuff in it.":angel:

hahahahahahhaa