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louisianahiker
2012-01-27, 10:15
I was just curious if anyone has ever made bannock in a military canteen cup. I'm an old Marine and I use mine for everything but I haven't tried baking in it before. Any suggestions?

SGT Rock
2012-01-27, 10:43
Nope

Hog On Ice
2012-01-27, 10:52
would this be like baking a muffin in a pot? - as in have an inner container for the batter that is raised up off the bottom of the pot with some water in the bottom of the pot and a relatively tight fitting lid - basically the muffin is cooked by steaming it

SGT Rock
2012-01-27, 12:16
Well it could be more like Fry bread couldn't it?

JERMM
2012-01-27, 12:20
I'd think cooking bannock in a military canteen cup would be hard, those things are narrow and deep and you'll need to turn the bannock so it cooks on both sides

HOI bannock is a fried bread, easily done on a shallow pan or skillet

Superman
2012-01-27, 12:22
I've successfully cooked cakes over campfire coals in frying pans. I've never used a canteen cup for cooking.

Hog On Ice
2012-01-27, 13:06
HOI bannock is a fried bread, easily done on a shallow pan or skillet

I think I have also heard of it being cooked wrapped around a stick

probably the easiest thing to do if backpacking would be to cook it on an oiled foil covered grill assuming one were to pack in a small grill

JERMM
2012-01-27, 13:21
I think I have also heard of it being cooked wrapped around a stick

probably the easiest thing to do if backpacking would be to cook it on an oiled foil covered grill assuming one were to pack in a small grill

I've heard of it cooked on a stick too, and seen a video of it cooked on a hot flat rock, but your idea of foil and grill sounds like a winner

louisianahiker
2012-01-27, 17:56
Thanks for the feedback...I always thought of bannock as a all around basic dough mix that could be made sticky like biscuits or runny like pancakes. I have heard of it being cooked on sticks. I'll play around with it and let you all know.

louisianahiker
2012-01-27, 20:07
Well I gave it a shot and it actually came out better than expected. I used a half cup of mix and two packs Subway olive oil, just enough water to make a sticky dough. Put it in non-stick foil. Placed some small rocks in the bottom of my cateen cup. One ounce of fuel in my Altoids stove and let it cook. I did turn it over about half way through (that was a small challenge). It did work though.

john pickett
2012-01-28, 01:16
louisianahiker, Risk has a fair amount on cooking bread, cake, etc on his web site. You might give him a shout.

Hog On Ice
2012-01-28, 01:41
is this what you are talking about? http://www.imrisk.com/woodgas/baking.htm

Rosaleen
2012-01-28, 14:17
I'm not personally acquainted with a canteen cup, but I believe it is shaped like the bottom of a hip-nestling canteen, yes?

I've steam-baked muffins, eggs, and cupcakes in various pots, one a repurposed 12 oz Vienna sausage can. That could be the closest to what you have.

Try a coil or W-shaped piece of aluminum can wall under a (Reynlod's) foil muffin liner or something similar, set into maybe a half-inch of water in your cup. It may be easier to assemble all the parts with dry mix in the muffin liner, then add water and stir with your spoon handle or knife. I'm thinking of the tall walls of your cup compared to mine and getting the muffin/cake/biscuit batter into your cup without spilling it.

Bannock dough is more or less a biscuit, which, in turn is a less sweet and drier plain muffin. (Guess why all can be made from baking mixes such as Bisquick?)

I haven't done this for a few years, but I think I filled the muffin cup 3/4 full with dry mix and stirred in a couple of tablespoons of water. YMMV by the mix, desired dryness of the finished product, etc. Any batter that you steam-bake should start off drier than one you will dry-bake since the steam will not remove water from the food being cooked. I also didn't use more than 2 tablespoons of alcohol, maybe only 1 tablespoon for my stove. The muffins were always done when I checked after I ran out of fuel, but there is no law saying we can't add fuel and relight the stove.

Oh, yes, be sure and cover the pot to keep in heat and steam, and have a plan to get the muffin out without burning yourself. The food is "done" when a stick or whatever inserted in the middle comes out clean, or the muffin, etc., springs back when poked in the middle.

Regards,

Rosaleen

louisianahiker
2012-01-28, 17:35
Thanks for the link Hog. I'm always trying to think of different foods and ways of cooking them. As long as it doesn't require adding a bunch of weight to my pack.

Ray
2012-01-28, 20:12
Silicone mufffin cups.

Somebody here uses them for campsite baking. Who was that?

Hog On Ice
2012-01-28, 20:48
Silicone mufffin cups.

Somebody here uses them for campsite baking. Who was that?

I think it was Kanga or Roots that mentioned them

correction - looks like JERMM was discussing them with Bulldawg and vonFrick

Rosaleen
2012-01-28, 22:03
Sarbar has shown using them in videos. For a short trip, the foil ones may be better. Plus, the foil can be somewhat altered to fit the vessel used. I don't know about reshaping a silicone cup to fit a canteen cup.

Another person who has shown trail baking is Brawny on her site, trailquest.net. I haven't looked for a while and hope the site is still up.

Rosaleen

Hog On Ice
2012-01-28, 22:33
took some digging but I think this is what you were talking about: http://www.trailquest.net/baking.html

Rosaleen
2012-01-29, 11:44
Well, well, not only is the site still up, but Brawny has added to it. For example, the cookbook, "Everything Except Corn Pasta," is new. Yes, that was the site I meant.

Rosaleen

willie520
2012-02-06, 23:30
the bottom of the pot with some water in the bottom of the pot and a relatively tight http://www.amzcard.info/g.gif