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View Full Version : Stupid ways to die.........or whatever



generoll
2012-07-16, 20:27
Ever since I saw a guy pull a huge Striped Bass using a plug right along the shoreline I've been fishing the banks from my boat....... and losing lures on a regular basis. The shoreline is lined with fallen trees and they keep reaching out and grabbing my lures, when the overhanging trees don't get them first.

So today when I got hung up again I decided to jump in and free up my lure. Well, is was a deep diving lure and had wrapped itself around a tree branch two or thee times and I got one turn off the branch when I had to resurface for air. And discovered that the triple gang hook on the back end had my finger. By turning my head sideways and pulling up on the lire I could catch a breath and then go back down to try and free myself. It's surprising just how strong monofilament can be when you don't want it to be. I finally figured out that I had the lure clipped on and was able to open the clip and get myself free and then swim back to the boat. So I guess I'll just leave the damn things stuck to the trees from now on.

cool breeze
2012-07-16, 20:31
That sounds like a bad dream. Fuck that.

sheepdog
2012-07-16, 21:18
damn

Kanga
2012-07-16, 21:29
fuckin a, gene. i mean, damn.

Skidsteer
2012-07-16, 21:39
At least you got the lure.

Betcha carry a pocketknife in your swim trunks from now on.

JERMM
2012-07-16, 21:40
Gene, Gene, Gene...what Kanga said x2

Roots
2012-07-16, 21:57
You were just wanting to be a lake statistic, weren't you! That's one of those 'don't try this at home' tricks...please don't repeat, dear. Glad you're ok!

generoll
2012-07-16, 22:17
basically I was just thinking how stupid this whole thing was. Caught by some cheap ass fishing lure with my feet up and my head down. The hook was into my finger past the barb, so when I got the lure loose and got back to the boat I had to push the hook on through until I could clip off the barb and then back it out. Still haven't caught that monster Bass.

Big Mac
2012-07-16, 22:30
Damn Gene, I think you have qualified for fucktard of the day.

Nearly Normal
2012-07-16, 22:37
You got to think about that shit when you're alone out there...and where I go a heap.

saimyoji
2012-07-16, 22:47
You got to think about that shit when you're alone out there...and where I go a heap.

damn straight. anywhere you go alone, take an extra helping of foresight with ya.....

Gary
2012-07-17, 00:34
reminded me of fishing from the bank, early this past spring. Got my favorite lure stuck on a tree limb and had to strip down to wade out and get it. Temp was 33 degrees. Froze and never got any fish, but I got the lure.

JDBaughman
2012-07-17, 00:50
Fuck man!

Law Dawg (ret)
2012-07-17, 20:18
It only counts if you had someone hold your beer and shouted "Watch this!". ;)

SGT Rock
2012-07-18, 22:14
Don't take up base jumping.

firemedic
2012-07-19, 03:36
You were just wanting to be a lake statistic, weren't you! That's one of those 'don't try this at home' tricks...please don't repeat, dear. Glad you're ok!

You got lucky, maybe take some extra time tell the big guy upstairs thanks.

I'm one of the ones that have to dive for the lake / river statistics, it is never fun


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hog On Ice
2012-07-19, 06:24
Don't take up base jumping.

bungee jumping is probably not a good idea also

SGT Rock
2012-07-19, 23:19
Don't ride like this guy either:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=SIUTXIsJz3o

Kanga
2012-07-20, 09:08
that right there is a fuckin retard.

D'Artagnan
2012-07-20, 09:40
He's got skill, though. Still stupid and a statistic waiting to happen, but skilled nonetheless.

SGT Rock
2012-07-20, 10:25
Apparently the Canadian cops want him, but he has fled to the US. The bike was registered to his mom, so now she has something like $1,900 in fines from the ride.

Cuffs
2012-07-20, 12:45
Too bad nobody decided to change lanes on his ass...

Superman
2012-07-20, 13:59
Stupid is as stupid does.

saimyoji
2012-07-20, 17:15
Too bad nobody decided to change lanes on his ass...

well, that's one way to look at it. another is: good thing no one decided to change lanes and have him crash and kill someone else and cost the taxpayers time and money cleaning up his sorry ass....

OR....

Too bad he didn't drive into the back of a steamroller....

Superman
2012-07-21, 11:14
There is a wonderfdul story on Fox News about Dr Mary Neal. She wrote a book called "To Heaven and Back." Her story is amazingly similar in many ways with my own near death experience.

Cuffs
2012-07-21, 14:45
She was on GMA a couple days ago. Good story.

firemedic
2012-07-23, 13:40
Or don't play with things that go boom

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pi50ojL8pFQ&feature=player_embedded&oref=http%3A%2F%2Fs.ytimg.com%2Fyt%2Fswfbin%2Fwatc h_as3-vflz3TPuD.swf

Tin Man
2012-07-24, 11:51
This guy is nuts...

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/07/24/final-test-jump-from-edge-space-set-for-tuesday/

SGT Rock
2012-07-24, 13:21
That does sound interesting. I remember seeing something on the earlier record holder. If I recall right when he did his first really high balloon dive his body initially went into a spin that could have blacked him out and caused him to die due to not being able to know when to open his chute, and he had a hard time getting out of it. Of course it worked out or he wouldn't be here.

Big Mac
2012-07-24, 16:15
People always want to blame the parachute when a skydiver is killed. We do a lot of root cause analysis at work and I can tell you the root cause is because the fucker jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

MonkeyBoy
2012-07-24, 17:11
People always want to blame the parachute when a skydiver is killed. We do a lot of root cause analysis at work and I can tell you the root cause is because the fucker jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

You know what the difference is between a golfer and a parachutist?

The golfer says "Whack......Damn"

Tin Man
2012-07-24, 17:23
People always want to blame the parachute when a skydiver is killed. We do a lot of root cause analysis at work and I can tell you the root cause is because the fucker jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

That's what my Daddy, the air force pilot, told me when I asked him about parachuting. Hell, most pilots would rather try to glide a wounded plane down than jump.

Superman
2012-07-24, 17:42
I used to skydive. I only had one malfuction. It was a very fast ride until it deployed just before eating dirt. If I could have done it over I would have gone to the reserve. I jumped again after that but not many.

Ray
2012-07-24, 18:00
People always want to blame the parachute when a skydiver is killed. We do a lot of root cause analysis at work and I can tell you the root cause is because the fucker jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.I've never jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

It was a C-130.

Russell
2012-07-24, 18:25
I jumped out of one of these 4 times:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairchild_C-119_Flying_Boxcar

My first jump was a C 141. My cherry blast was out of a C 130 at night.

Tin Man
2012-07-24, 18:31
I've never jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

It was a C-130.

hey, my dad flew c-130's as a weekend warrior. I blame his partial deafness on those.

Bearpaw
2012-07-24, 20:43
I jumped C-130's, C-141's, CH-46's, CH-53's, UH-1's, and got a water jump from a Coast Guard SH-3. It feels like I did as many helo jumps as fixed wing. Only time I ever jumped doors was with army units, mostly the 82nd Airborne. Ramp jumps were much smoother. With helo jumps, you could actually feel a distinct downward fall, instead of the sideways slam of air resistance and jet/prop wash off of fixed wing.

Skidsteer
2012-07-24, 20:58
People always want to blame the parachute when a skydiver is killed. We do a lot of root cause analysis at work and I can tell you the root cause is because the fucker jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

Hahahahaha!

atraildreamer
2012-07-25, 13:03
Ever since I saw a guy pull a huge Striped Bass using a plug right along the shoreline I've been fishing the banks from my boat.......

You just proved what my uncle told me a lo-o-o-o-ng time ago: "When you are on shore, you are casting out. When you are in a boat...you are casting in!" :fisheye:

atraildreamer
2012-07-25, 13:21
Bet you can't top this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Excelsior

Project Excelsior
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Project Excelsior was a series of high-altitude parachute jumps made by Colonel (then Captain) Joseph Kittinger of the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1959 and 1960 to test the Beaupre multi-stage parachute system. In one of these jumps Kittinger set world records for the highest parachute jump, the longest parachute drogue fall and the fastest speed by a human through the atmosphere,

"...climbing to an altitude of 102,800 feet (31,333 m).[2] The ascent took one hour and 31 minutes and broke the previous manned balloon altitude record of 101,516 feet (30,942 m), which was set by Major David Simons as part of Project Man High in 1957. Kittinger stayed at peak altitude for 12 minutes, waiting for the balloon to drift over the landing target area. He then stepped out of the gondola to begin his descent.

The small stabilizer parachute deployed successfully and Kittinger fell for 4 minutes and 36 seconds,[2] setting a long-standing world record for the longest free-fall. At an altitude of 17,500 feet (5,334 m), Kittinger opened his main parachute and landed safely in the New Mexico desert. The whole descent took 13 minutes and 45 seconds and set the current world record for the highest parachute jump.[3] During the descent, Kittinger experienced temperatures as low as −94 °F (−70 °C). In the free-fall stage, he reached a top speed of 614 miles per hour (988 km/h).

JDBaughman
2012-07-26, 10:23
How about the story of Bastille day in France. When the citizens started gathering at the gate, they were drinking and getting pissed off... Well, after a while, a guy climbs over the gate and cuts the chain that holds the door up. It comes crashing down killing 8 of the protestors instantly. Then the others run through the gate and free the prisoners... All 7 of them... 7 prisoners... They killed 8 of their own, to free 7 prisoners. So the first casualties of the French Revolution, were from themselves being drunk and stupid.

You can look this up.

JDBaughman
2012-07-26, 10:31
I've never jumped out of a perfectly good aircraft.

It was a C-130.

I've caught a few rides on c130s... The freaky thing is that when the plane banks, you can hear the popping sounds of the wings flexing... But what is even more freaky is the fat that the popping sound sounds more like fibers breaking then just flex... Those panes have been flying since the 60's... They must be doing something right...

when it's not leaking oil and hydraulic fluid, THAT'S when you need to sart worrying!

Cuffs
2012-07-26, 16:52
Don't ride like this guy either:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=SIUTXIsJz3o

I suppose the other stupid part was to post a video of his ride. BC police started looking for and found the asshat!

http://jalopnik.com/5929254/motorcycle-rider-who-filmed-himself-doing-186-mph-turns-himself-in

Superman
2012-07-26, 18:42
How about the story of Bastille day in France. When the citizens started gathering at the gate, they were drinking and getting pissed off... Well, after a while, a guy climbs over the gate and cuts the chain that holds the door up. It comes crashing down killing 8 of the protestors instantly. Then the others run through the gate and free the prisoners... All 7 of them... 7 prisoners... They killed 8 of their own, to free 7 prisoners. So the first casualties of the French Revolution, were from themselves being drunk and stupid.

You can look this up.

That's a great story.

Kanga
2012-07-26, 19:26
I suppose the other stupid part was to post a video of his ride. BC police started looking for and found the asshat!

http://jalopnik.com/5929254/motorcycle-rider-who-filmed-himself-doing-186-mph-turns-himself-in


That's a great story.

so is this.
that stupid asshat puts so many others' lives at risk it's unreal. somebody outta smack his mama for ever having sex.

generoll
2012-07-28, 11:06
OK, yesterday was Carols turn. The kids came up and we went out on the lake. There's a rope swing near the bridge so Amanda and I took a shot at it. Carol decided that she needed to do this as well. The ground slopes steeply down to a point about 3 feet above the rocky beach and then out into the water. Carol lost her grip on the rope and her balance, rolled down the hillside to the drop off and then fell about 3 feet onto the rocks. Amanda and I got to her at the same time and she was just kind of groggy with a "what happened?" look on her face. After we got her back onto the boat she decided a trip to the E.R. was in order so Amanda took her while my son in law and I continued our search for that damned monster Striper.

The E.R. super glued her lip back together and recommended cold compresses for her two broken ribs. She gonna have one helluva shiner on her cheek. Seems it's a race between us to see which of us can self destruct first.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Tin Man
2012-07-28, 11:18
Am I reading this right? You went fishing while your family went to the hospital??? ... well, that's just fucking... awesome! you are my new hero.

sheepdog
2012-07-28, 12:46
Am I reading this right? You went fishing while your family went to the hospital??? ... well, that's just fucking... awesome! you are my new hero.

:dito:

generoll
2012-07-28, 21:51
remind me to tell you about the time I left my wife under a rock in the Grand Canyon.

sheepdog
2012-07-29, 14:49
remind me to tell you about the time I left my wife under a rock in the Grand Canyon.

How long until you can claim the insurance money??

Tin Man
2012-07-29, 14:57
How long until you can claim the insurance money??

7 years, sooner if they find the body... has to look like an accident though

generoll
2012-07-29, 15:35
nope, even rolling her down a hillside didn't work.

atraildreamer
2012-10-14, 17:26
Bet you can't top this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Excelsior

Project Excelsior
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Project Excelsior was a series of high-altitude parachute jumps made by Colonel (then Captain) Joseph Kittinger of the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1959 and 1960 to test the Beaupre multi-stage parachute system. In one of these jumps Kittinger set world records for the highest parachute jump, the longest parachute drogue fall and the fastest speed by a human through the atmosphere,

"...climbing to an altitude of 102,800 feet (31,333 m).[2] The ascent took one hour and 31 minutes and broke the previous manned balloon altitude record of 101,516 feet (30,942 m), which was set by Major David Simons as part of Project Man High in 1957. Kittinger stayed at peak altitude for 12 minutes, waiting for the balloon to drift over the landing target area. He then stepped out of the gondola to begin his descent.

The small stabilizer parachute deployed successfully and Kittinger fell for 4 minutes and 36 seconds,[2] setting a long-standing world record for the longest free-fall. At an altitude of 17,500 feet (5,334 m), Kittinger opened his main parachute and landed safely in the New Mexico desert. The whole descent took 13 minutes and 45 seconds and set the current world record for the highest parachute jump.[3] During the descent, Kittinger experienced temperatures as low as −94 °F (−70 °C). In the free-fall stage, he reached a top speed of 614 miles per hour (988 km/h).

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/15/us/felix-baumgartner-skydiving.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

By JOHN TIERNEY
Published: October 14, 2012

ROSWELL, N.M. — Felix Baumgartner, the professional daredevil, jumped from a balloon more than 24 miles above the Earth on Sunday, and landed safely on his feet.

A helium-filled balloon, the largest ever used for a manned flight, lifted the capsule into the air. More Photos »

People around the world watched on the Web as Mr. Baumgartner stood on the edge of his capsule completing a final checklist, then jumped into a near vacuum at above 127,000 feet, or more than 24 miles. Minutes later he landed in the eastern New Mexico desert, and lifted his arms in victory.

Back at mission control and in a waiting room, his support team and family cheered.

Mr. Baumgartner, 43, a former Austrian paratrooper, took 2 hours 21 minutes to reach the height, lifting off in an enormous helium balloon that smoothly carried him through the critical first 4,000 feet — called the Dead Zone because it would be impossible to parachute to safety.

From the sky above the New Mexico desert he had hoped to make the highest jump in history and become the first sky diver to break the speed of sound. But exact times, distances and records were not immediately known; mission control said it first needed to retrieve the data from computer chips in Mr. Baumgartner’s suit.

"It was harder than I expected," Mr. Baumgarter said after returning by helicopter to mission control in Roswell. "Trust me, when you stand up there on top of the world, you become so humble. It’s not about breaking records anymore. It’s not about getting scientific data. It’s all about coming home."

Before the jump, Mr. Baumgartner went through a checklist with help from Joe Kittinger, 84, the retired Air Force colonel who in 1960 jumped from 102,800 feet, setting records that remained more than half a century later — and that Mr. Baumgartner was hoping to break.

During the second hour of ascent, Mr. Baumgartner complained to Mr. Kittinger that the heating system in his visor was not working properly, and the visor was fogging up. At that point viewers following the live feed of the mission stopped hearing the men’s conversation. The Red Bull Stratos team said that Mr. Kittinger had decided to “enable private conversation.”

After his leap into space Mr. Baumgartner again complained about fog in his visor, but it did not seem to impede his ability to gain control during his fall.

The mission required the largest balloon ever used for a manned flight. Made of 40 acres of ultrathin plastic, it had been described as an inflated dry-cleaning bag that would fill the Los Angeles Coliseum.

When inflated and attached to Mr. Baumgartner’s pressurized capsule, the balloon towered 750 feet above the ground.

An earlier attempt to inflate the balloon and carry out the mission had to be abandoned last week because of weather. The winds at the balloon’s height and at the ground had to be less than three miles an hour for it to be launched safely, so that there was no chance of the balloon lurching and smashing the capsule into the ground.

Until the last minute on Sunday, it was not certain that the mission would actually happen.

Mr. Baumgartner, wearing a pressurized suit to survive in the near vacuum at the edge of space, had hoped reach a speed of more than 700 miles an hour. He was backed by a NASA-style mission control operation at an airfield in Roswell that involved 300 people, including more than 70 engineers, scientists and physicians who have been working for five years on the project, called Red Bull Stratos, after the drink company that has financed it.

Besides aiming at records, the engineers and scientists on the Red Bull Stratos team are gathering and publishing reams of data intended to help future pilots, astronauts and perhaps space tourists survive if they have to bail out.

“We’re testing new space suits, escape concepts, and treatment protocols for pressure loss at extreme altitudes,” said the Red Bull Stratos medical director, Dr. Jonathan Clark, who formerly oversaw the health of space shuttle crews at NASA. “There are so many things that could go wrong here that we’re pushing the technical envelope.”

While building the customized suit and capsule, the team of aerospace veterans had to contend with one crucial uncertainty: What happens to the human body when it breaks the sound barrier? There was also one major unexpected problem for Mr. Baumgartner, known to his fans as Fearless Felix.

Although he had no trouble jumping off buildings and bridges, and soaring across the English Channel in a carbon-fiber wing, he found himself suffering panic attacks when forced to spend hours inside the pressurized suit and helmet. At one point in 2010, rather than take an endurance test in it, he went to an airport and fled the United States. With the help of a sports psychologist and other specialists, he learned techniques for dealing with the claustrophobia.

One of the techniques Mr. Baumgartner developed for dealing with claustrophobia was to stay busy throughout the ascent. Mr. Baumgartner conversed steadily, in Austrian-accented English, with Mr. Kittinger, a former fighter pilot whose deep voice exuded the right stuff as he confidently went through a 40-item checklist rehearsing every move that Mr. Baumgartner would make when it came time to leave the capsule — tasks like sliding his seat forward, checking his parachutes, and carefully opening the hatch.



“Item 38: stand up on the exterior step but be sure to duck your head down low as you go out that door,” Mr. Kittinger said. After Mr. Baumgartner confirmed that and the next two steps, Mr. Kittinger said, "The rest is yours."

They finished that rehearsal one hour into the ascent, after the balloon had ascended safely through the jet stream and reached 60,000 feet. It was still visible from the ground by naked eye. Through binoculars, it could be observed growing wider as the helium expanded in the thinning stratosphere.

Besides being his most complex challenge, the stratospheric jump is also the one most likely to be made into a buddy movie, thanks to the friendship that he developed with Mr. Kittinger, who helped train Mr. Baumgartner.

Mr. Kittinger, a former test pilot, set his records in a 1960 trip to the stratosphere. Early during that ascent, also over New Mexico, in an Air Force balloon, one of his pressurized gloves leaked, but he was so determined to keep going that he did not report the problem, even after his hand swelled to twice its normal size.

Ignoring the pain, he rode the balloon up to 102,800 feet and said a short prayer — “Lord, take care of me now” — before stepping off. He reached a speed of 614 miles an hour and spent 4 minutes, 36 seconds in free fall. Those records were repeatedly challenged during the ensuing half century, sometimes with fatal consequences.

The original stratospheric jump by Mr. Kittinger was part of an Air Force program studying ways to help pilots survive high-altitude bailouts. It experimented with a small parachute, called a drogue, to prevent the jumper’s body from going into a flat spin — a hazard that almost killed Mr. Kittinger in a preliminary jump in 1959. When his drogue chute became entangled around his neck, his body spun at 120 revolutions a minute, causing him to blackout until his emergency parachute automatically deployed. An improved version of that drogue chute is now used by military pilots who have to bail out in the ejection-seats used by pilots.

Mr. Baumgartner was equipped with his own customized high-tech drogue chute but as a precaution — to be activated only if he began spinning out of control. Otherwise, he planned to avoid using it because the drogue chute would have slowed him down just enough to prevent him from going supersonic.

To avoid spinning out of control, Mr. Baumgartner practiced doing a bunny hop out of the capsule and controlling his body so that it rotated into headfirst position for the supersonic descent.

“We try to anticipate as much as we can about supersonic speed,” Dr. Clark said before the jump, “but we don’t really know, because nobody has done this before.”

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: October 14, 2012

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the inflation of the balloon. It started at 10:45 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, not standard time.

Big Mac
2012-10-15, 09:47
Too long.

Roots
2012-10-15, 10:03
I'll read the book...

Cuffs
2012-10-15, 10:33
Too. Many. Words.

john pickett
2012-10-15, 11:17
My son makes the same complaint, usually when he gets pulled over after going through a stop sign.
And He's an Alabaman too!

firemedic
2012-10-15, 14:04
The condensed version states, he jumped from 127,000 plus feet, broke the sound barrier on the way down, and landed on his feet. What it didnt say was, Felix has balls that clank !!!!!!!

Chuck Norris had a child and named him Felix Baumgartner LOL

Rosaleen
2012-10-15, 14:59
Yowza!

It sounds like a chunk of finger may have pulled off before the monofilament could break.

With all the crazy stuff going on in the world, the poster with the fish hook wound might want to check to see if his tetanus shots are current and keep a close eye on the wound for infection. I'm remembering a news report of a young woman whose leg was scraped on river rocks. She ended up with flesh-eating bacteria causing her leg and maybe arms needing amputation. Just crazy for a simple wound in an innocent setting.

Tin Man
2012-10-15, 17:29
I'll read the book...

National Geographic is airing a 2-hour documentary next month. I wasted too much time watching it live. Boring!

firemedic
2012-10-15, 18:12
Yowza!

It sounds like a chunk of finger may have pulled off before the monofilament could break.

With all the crazy stuff going on in the world, the poster with the fish hook wound might want to check to see if his tetanus shots are current and keep a close eye on the wound for infection. I'm remembering a news report of a young woman whose leg was scraped on river rocks. She ended up with flesh-eating bacteria causing her leg and maybe arms needing amputation. Just crazy for a simple wound in an innocent setting.

I had a coworker pass away from tetanus
He cut his finger on a 55 gal drum, went to company doc for treatment, ended up going back for infection, they did surgery he started feeling bad about a week later, they said go home and rest for a few days, he never woke up


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Rosaleen
2012-10-15, 20:28
Holy sh**!

After mourning the loss, I'd be asking questions about whether or not the doc's actions met the "standard of care." I'd want to avoid that doc like the plague and go hunting a good lawyer. There is a hospital nearby that I've instructed my family to never allow me to be admitted. Too many mishaps. Of course, it is where the group that my primary care doc does its surgeries. I went looking for referrals on my own when I needed a couple of surgeries. It would have been easier to just go to the surgeons that my PCP had on her "list." No thanks! Some places are just too risky to use.

Superman
2012-10-15, 20:34
Holy sh**!

After mourning the loss, I'd be asking questions about whether or not the doc's actions met the "standard of care." I'd want to avoid that doc like the plague and go hunting a good lawyer. There is a hospital nearby that I've instructed my family to never allow me to be admitted. Too many mishaps. Of course, it is where the group that my primary care doc does its surgeries. I went looking for referrals on my own when I needed a couple of surgeries. It would have been easier to just go to the surgeons that my PCP had on her "list." No thanks! Some places are just too risky to use.


I agree

Kanga
2012-10-15, 22:44
Holy sh**!

After mourning the loss, I'd be asking questions about whether or not the doc's actions met the "standard of care." I'd want to avoid that doc like the plague and go hunting a good lawyer. There is a hospital nearby that I've instructed my family to never allow me to be admitted. Too many mishaps. Of course, it is where the group that my primary care doc does its surgeries. I went looking for referrals on my own when I needed a couple of surgeries. It would have been easier to just go to the surgeons that my PCP had on her "list." No thanks! Some places are just too risky to use.

same here. barrow county medical center. if that's all i've got, just go on and put me down.

Wonder
2012-10-17, 08:27
My trust of ERs is very low. After my wreck, I went to a "good hospital" in a wealthy area. I was discharged with whiplash. 3 days later, I went to my family doc as I was told to. Failed my neuro exam and had my drivers license medically suspended. Hospital missed the double concussion and hairline spinal fractures. My family doc said that I should have been admitted to the hospital for at least 48 hours of observation and been given a neck brace. I guess I wasn't rich enough

Rosaleen
2012-10-17, 09:03
ER treatment is totally a "Luck of the Draw" situation, IMHO and experience. Outcomes can be dependent on which staff are on duty that night and how busy they are. We could sit around a campfire for hours, swapping stories, some horrible, some good. The same ER where I was really unhappy with one son's treatment during an asthma episode did a great job of stitching hubby's hand after an incident with a table saw and caught another son's hairline fracture along his tibia's growth plate. (14 YO, growth spurt age=very bad timing) Sometimes the docs are moonlighting from their day jobs, others the docs are specifically trained in emergency medicine. I've seen both in the same place.