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sheepdog
2012-07-30, 13:38
Are there any shooters who reload their own bullets here?

I like to shoot....a lot....and am looking to save some money.

SGT Rock
2012-07-30, 13:41
I looked into it. If you get a good set up, you will probably brake even if you do about 10,000 rounds.

sheepdog
2012-07-30, 13:42
I looked into it. If you get a good set up, you will probably brake even if you do about 10,000 rounds.

So I'll break even in a week??


sweet!!!

Cuffs
2012-07-30, 13:43
My dad still does his own reloading. Im betting hes selling off all that stuff too...

generoll
2012-07-30, 14:06
if you're looking for cheap shooting get a Mosin Nagant. The rifles run about $125 and you can buy a spam can with 440 rounds for around $85. Reloading isn't a money saving way to go. It's more about fine tuning your round to your rifle.

Livx
2012-07-30, 14:14
I agree with Sgt. Rock. A coworker of mine has reloading equipment and will let me use it, so last week I priced the materials needed to reload 500 rounds of .45acp. at midway.com. It was going to cost me around $160. I would have alot of powder and primers left over though that would slightly reduce the cost on the next 500 rounds or so.

Once you had your own brass though, I think you would save enough $ reloading to make it worth while.

Nearly Normal
2012-07-30, 14:40
Loading shotgun shells is only cheaper if you have a place to get materials without the full hazmat fees ...like a club where group orders are placed ....and you have the shells... But you can usually get shells.. AA's.. for nothing if you know where.
I still have about a thousand "Peters" hulls that load great...over and over.
Bullets take a bit more prep and care.
Lead has gone sky high in the last 10 years and has become evil juju.
I may rejoin my old club..I miss shooting skeet.

SGT Rock
2012-07-30, 15:17
I agree with Sgt. Rock. A coworker of mine has reloading equipment and will let me use it, so last week I priced the materials needed to reload 500 rounds of .45acp. at midway.com. It was going to cost me around $160. I would have alot of powder and primers left over though that would slightly reduce the cost on the next 500 rounds or so.

Once you had your own brass though, I think you would save enough $ reloading to make it worth while.
Pretty much right. You reload because you want your own loads done your way. After figuring for the equipment and supplies, you could probably break even at 10,000 rounds. But then if you also decide to factor in your own time, you probably lose in the long run because of the amount of time you would spend doing it you could spend doing other things. I think the better way for most of us is to probably buy in bulk from a good reloads seller. Here is an example of a place that sells reloaded ammo: http://georgia-arms.com/ammunition.aspx

That said, I do not recommend Georgia Arms. A while back I bought some .223 from them, about 200 rounds I think. Anyhow, it was keyholing at the range. I had just bought a new AR15 and thought my rifle was gaked up. But I then shot some Remmington .223 from it and zeroed in about 6 rounds. So I wrote them and they apologized and said someone did a batch with the wrong bullets (.222 instead of .223?) and they sent me a replacement pack of 100 rounds. So I got screwed 100 rounds and they never returned other e-mails about that other 100.

So anyhow, I take that new bunch to the range and about 5 rounds in I have a squib load. I get the bullet out of the barrel and a few rounds later I have another squib load.

QC at Georgia Arms sucks.

Jim Henderson
2012-07-30, 17:54
Yeah, if you shoot a lot or want a load that is "just right" for your gun then reloading makes sense. Of course there is the enjoyment I had when ever I reload. Kind of like a relaxing evening picking the lint out of my navel.

Don't know what a beginner reload set costs now a days, I started in the early 80s and it cost me probably $200 to start on one caliber. But additional die sets etc don't hurt quite as bad for additional calibers.

One way I found that really saves $$ is to find a local component manufacturer and buy their "Excess, blems, seconds" whatever. I used to buy Sierra Bullets(In Los Angeles, now Mo) in all calibers and types for just a little over the cost of scrap metal by the 10# box or more. They were darn good bullets. The seconds were excellent, the bulk rejects needed inspection. Either way you could not beat the price. Don't ask me about the time I got a call at 2am by the VP of sales where I used to work asking if I had shipped 100# of Matchking bullets to my co worker in corp HQ. That was fun. Got a wrist slapping, the VP was a swell guy.

Anyway, I digress. If you reload a single stage at a time(some people say this is most accurate, and the press is cheaper) you may be able to reload about 100-200 complete rounds per hour. A progressive press can do that and even well past 500rph depending. So figure your time in.

With my kids blowing off hundreds of rounds on a single trip to the range, I have a lot of brass waiting to be reloaded. It will take me years to catch up. It was much easier when I was single.

However... if I paid retail for all that ammo, we are talking thousands of dollars. Even with me reloading, it was well into the hundreds, but as some have mentioned, you have a lot of leftover components when you buy in bulk, like powder. So the cost is not bad.


Waaay back when I figured out the cost per round, the economic sense depended on what caliber. Some ammo is reloaded so cheap on the commercial market(223, 38s, 9mms), I could hardly beat the cost if I did it my self. For example back in the 80s, I figured if I reloaded 223(AR15 food) it cost me something like 5 cents per round. The commerical reloads were about 6 cents per round, new American made mil type was going for something like $3 per 20round pack. 1 cent was not worth my time, but I did it anyway. For other stuff like 44mags, the cost difference does make it more worthwhile.

To save any money, buy in bulk. Keep an eye on prices and go to the big gun shows to save on shipping. Kegs of powder, not 1 pounders. Bricks of primers, or better cases of bricks, not 100packs. Bullets in 1000 round bulk or more. And so on. Have a buddy who is also a gun nut go in shares with you on big buys. Buying off the shelf from your local gun dealer supports the local economy, but it sure doesn't make economic sense.

Just my opinion.

Jim Henderson

Oh by the way, another benefit. I always had a good laugh whenever my wife would vacuum up dropped primers that fell into the den carpet. The beater brush would explode one every now and then. Yes spent primers sometimes still have some kick in them. BTW, I now have to reload in the garage.

Jim Henderson
2012-07-30, 18:08
A couple more thoughts...

For pistol, you might consider using lead bullets. Buy HARD Cast bullets so you don't lead the heck out of your barrel. I also had good results from copper plated lead bullets. Lead is OK in medium to low full power loads. Any bullet you can scrathc with your thumb nail will lead like crazy if you load them past wadcutter type velocities.

For rifle bulletts, consider lead bullets for non automatic rifles only, don't want to clog gas ports. And avoid rifles with pitted bores, lead bullets are like they are on a cheese grater there and you will spend hours cleaning the lead out.

If you use any new or once fired military brass, get yourself a military strength decapping pin for your press. Also get yourself a pocket reamer. I have one of those RCBS(?? Greenlabel) electric case preparers and that will save you hours and blisters reaming pockets, cleaning pockets, deburring the case neck etc.

Reloading is an enjoyable hobby, but there is a risk of toomany toolitis. I have never regretted it and with two boys it actually does save me money but not time. Plus there is the occasional science experiment with the boys... "Now watch son how this black powder burn rate compares to the flattened ball versus the stick powders". Fooosh.

Buy yourself one of those Outers Lead out contraptions. Works good.

Skidsteer
2012-07-30, 18:20
Sheesh.

Reloading is more expensive than backpacking.

JERMM
2012-07-30, 18:27
Loading shotgun shells is only cheaper if you have a place to get materials without the full hazmat fees ...like a club where group orders are placed ....and you have the shells... But you can usually get shells.. AA's.. for nothing if you know where.
I still have about a thousand "Peters" hulls that load great...over and over.
Bullets take a bit more prep and care.
Lead has gone sky high in the last 10 years and has become evil juju.
I may rejoin my old club..I miss shooting skeet.

we use to reload around 10,000 shells per month, bought shot one ton at a time, cases of primers and powder...man it was fun shootin

Skidsteer
2012-07-30, 18:34
Get Nearly Normal to tell his story about the most expensive shotgun in the world.

Funny stuff and he's lucky Miss Sharon let him live. :biggrin:

JERMM
2012-07-30, 18:59
Get Nearly Normal to tell his story about the most expensive shotgun in the world.

Funny stuff and he's lucky Miss Sharon let him live. :biggrin:



okay NN let's hear it

sheepdog
2012-07-30, 20:40
Thanks for the info Jim,


We have long winters up north. Lots of spare time when I'm not ice fishing.

JERMM
2012-07-30, 20:45
Thanks for the info Jim,


We have long winters up north. Lots of spare time when I'm not ice fishing.

ice fish...is that like fish sticks

sheepdog
2012-07-30, 20:46
ice fish...is that like fish sticks

Lots of drinking and looking in the hole.


a hanging curve ball...

sheepdog
2012-07-30, 20:57
Y'all need work on you snappy comebacks.

Nearly Normal
2012-07-30, 21:08
okay NN let's hear it

I've sworn off Ducks Unlimited banquets.

chumpchange
2012-07-31, 00:49
i don't know if i could trust my own reloads.

Tin Man
2012-07-31, 07:49
Lots of drinking and looking in the hole.


a hanging curve ball...

It takes me 20-30 minutes to reload, good time for a drink, but I don't look in the hole...she's busy making me a sammich.

D'Artagnan
2012-07-31, 10:14
When I was shooting skeet on a regular basis, I reloaded my own shells. One time I got the ratio off a bit and loaded a bunch of hot shells that got mixed in with the regular ones. Made for some interesting rounds. Boom, Boom, BAMMMM

JERMM
2012-07-31, 10:25
When I was shooting skeet on a regular basis, I reloaded my own shells. One time I got the ratio off a bit and loaded a bunch of hot shells that got mixed in with the regular ones. Made for some interesting rounds. Boom, Boom, BAMMMM

that happened with a shooter standing on the post next to me, nearly wet my pants. He sat out the next field and bought factory shells to finish up the event.

chumpchange
2012-07-31, 10:59
It takes me 20-30 minutes to reload, good time for a drink, but I don't look in the hole...she's busy making me a sammich.

your powder is wet.

Nearly Normal
2012-07-31, 11:32
When I was shooting skeet on a regular basis, I reloaded my own shells. One time I got the ratio off a bit and loaded a bunch of hot shells that got mixed in with the regular ones. Made for some interesting rounds. Boom, Boom, BAMMMM

One's with a cocked wad that go fftt are no good...always check the barrel after that.
Zingers ain't good either.

D'Artagnan
2012-07-31, 15:18
One's with a cocked wad that go fftt are no good...always check the barrel after that.
Zingers ain't good either.


These definitely cleared the barrel.

Big Mac
2012-07-31, 18:05
He said cocked wad . . .

Tin Man
2012-07-31, 19:59
He said cocked wad . . .

well, maybe he meant he shot his wad?

Wonder
2012-07-31, 22:17
My did had me popping primers out of old 12guage rounds as young as 5. I thought that everyone did that!!! My job on hunting trips was to collect the shells. However, I don't see me doing it anymore unless I inherit the set up

moytoy
2012-08-01, 06:25
I used a Lee handloader for 30-30 cart. when I was a teenager. I still have the loader in the original box. I still have some cases and bullets left from back in the day. I should get some powder and primers and load some for nastalgia. FWIW handloading is for accuracy and reloading is for economy.

Cuffs
2012-08-01, 11:39
If you have to reload, you missed 'em too many times. go back to the range and practice some more!

chumpchange
2012-08-01, 11:47
that's what pillow talk is for.

D'Artagnan
2012-08-01, 12:02
My did had me popping primers out of old 12guage rounds as young as 5. I thought that everyone did that!!! My job on hunting trips was to collect the shells. However, I don't see me doing it anymore unless I inherit the set up

I had a MEC progressive reloader for my 12 GA shells. One of its processes was punching out the spent primer cartridge. A buddy of mine's son kept thousands of those things and I later learned he had created amazing mosaics using them. Some were a darker brass because of the manufacturer and he was able to arrange them in such a way that he could create some really cool images.

sheepdog
2012-08-04, 10:10
I have my .223 empties polishing in the cleaner. I'm gonna be makin my own bullets soon........poof no eyebrows.

JERMM
2012-08-04, 10:25
my great-grandma's brother shot the nose off one of the other brothers...wait that has nothing to do with reloading and yes liquor was involved

sheepdog
2012-08-04, 10:27
my great-grandma's brother shot the nose off one of the other brothers...wait that has nothing to do with reloading and yes liquor was involved

I accidentally cut my brother's ear off........I've been earresponsible ever since.

Hog On Ice
2012-08-04, 10:29
-1 to sheepdog for bad pun

mudhead
2012-08-04, 15:06
I accidentally cut my brother's ear off........I've been earresponsible ever since.

I herd you weren't too sharp.

sheepdog
2012-08-04, 20:31
hey!!!