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generoll
2012-09-04, 10:47
has anyone ever tried one of these?

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=1020797&ecid=e236d&utm_source=internal&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=e236d&em_id=generoll2000@yahoo.com

Ray
2012-09-04, 11:27
Yeah, one of the fathers in our Scout troop had that, or something similar, and used it to refill propane cannisters.

Only problem was frequently a re-used cannister would not seal shut after unscrewing it from the stove. His solution was to screw it back into the stove, turn off the stove valve and leave attached until it was used again. That beat my solution of chunking it into the woods.

generoll
2012-09-04, 11:35
I've had a problem in the past with one of thise 1lb canisters not sealing when I removed it from the appliance. Guess it's got a certain fiddle factor that comes with it.

JERMM
2012-09-04, 11:39
Gene i read a review on these, if i can find it i'll add the link, but from what i remember the results wasn't positive, leaking canisters and the fuel blend didn't work as well with small backpacking stoves.

JERMM
2012-09-04, 11:59
Gene- found this

http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2012/03/canister-refiller-warning.html

cool breeze
2012-09-04, 12:30
Different animal. The one Gene is asking about refills the steel propane canisters for Coleman stoves.

generoll
2012-09-04, 12:36
he's right Jermm. Thanks for the link and the good information, but I was thinking about refilling the 1lb canisters such as you use on Coleman camping stoves and lanterns. Too heavy and bulky for backpacking. I had a connecting tube with multiple outlets that I used for car camping, but it put the lantern right at eyelevel and really wasn't as useful as I'd hoped. The 1lb canisters are simpler to use.

Jim Henderson
2012-09-04, 14:00
Yeah I have used a similar device(Paulin brand) for maybe 30 years. I also am a member of a website that plays with stoves and such, and refilling cannisters is one of those topics which generatelots of talk about pros and cons.

My experience in refilling dozens of 1 pound propane cylinders is that there is about a 10% leak rate. That is relatively high so You WILL have a leak sooner or later. So, never leave a recently filled cartridge near a fire or souce of ignition.

Listen to the recently filled cannister for a hiss. Wait a few hours and smell for leaking gas or do a "bubble" test. Soap and water. Check again several times at later dates

Most usually the cannister will leak from the threaded fitting. There is a Schrader type valve inside that appears to wear out or not seal 10% of the time. If a cannister does leak either leave it plugged into a stove and use it up as soon as practical. Or leave the cartridge outside where it can slowly vent.

A con of refilling with most adapters is that you cannot get a nearly full cannister. Wild guess is maybe 80% full at best. It is possible to fill even more but that increases the risk so I won't go into it.

The biggest pro is that refilling from a bulk tank costs far far less than buying a new cartridge and I hate to just throw away such a heavy piece of steel just because it is empty. Wild guess per fill is $1 per fill.

While filling, there may be some venting and even leakage of liquid propane. STAY AWAY from Flame. Do not let the liquid propane stay on your skin for too long. Frostbite is a real possibiility, so is a KaBOOOM.

It is worth doing but Do KNOW what you are doing, and check for leaks periodically.

Jim Henderson

BTW, the picture on the advert is wrong. You get best results with the bulk tank upside down. You want liquid propane transfer. Finding a place to turn the tank upside down and fill the small tank is the hardest part of the task. BUT FOLLOW ANY INSTRUCTIONS THAT CAME WITH THE ADAPTER

Jim Henderson
2012-09-04, 14:31
As far as the other adapter to refill backpack cannisters with propane, yes that can be a dangerous proposition for the reasons explained on the webpage mentioned above.

Also, in my experience, adapters to supply pure propane to a stove or whatever that uses a blend usually does not work well. The pressure of the pure propane is usually too much which causes 1 of 3 things to happen...

1) If you are lucky and your appliance has a good control valve with wide control limits, then the adapter will work, on low.
2) If the appliance doesn't have a well behaved control valve, the appliance will flare or be pretty much on full blast.
3) Strangely some appliances will shut down, almost like they have a regulator that shuts off if the pressure is too high.

There are better alternatives to refilling backpack cartridges. There are adapters to refill or just substitute those cheap Butane only cartrdiges that are avaialble everywhere, especially Asian food stores. They look like spray paint cans and cost about $1 per 8oz can.

A much better alternative and well liked by the previously mentioned stovie website I belong to.

Jim Henderson

Follow this webpage for info on properly refilling Butane mix cartridges. It is by Hiking Jim a member of the previously mentioned website and knowledgable about such things. He hasn't gone up in a cloud of flame yet.

http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2012/01/gas-canister-refilling.html

Jim Henderson
2012-09-04, 14:32
deleted

Tin Man
2012-09-04, 19:45
I'd be careful fooling with propane to save a few bucks... while this is an extreme example, it shows you the power of that shit handled improperly...

http://www.newstimes.com/news/article/1-confirmed-dead-in-New-Milford-explosion-3825577.php#photo-3384937

Hog On Ice
2012-09-04, 19:51
rule #1 for refilling gas canisters - do it outside where any gas leaks can't accumulate

sheepdog
2012-09-04, 21:36
poof no eyebrows