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View Full Version : Art Loeb Trail, NC, Oct 20-23, '13



Bearpaw
2013-10-26, 23:50
Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fall. Always my favorite time of year. Football, cooler weather, great colors. So I was excited and nervous as I prepared to hike the Art Loeb Trail in North Carolina’s Pisqah National Forest. Excited because I knew the trail offered some great rewards. Nervous because I knew the trail held some very difficult hiking that would challenge me after recovering from a severe case of pneumonia over the summer.

The trail is only 30 miles long, but a hiker who starts at the southern terminus at Davidson River Campground will climb over 8000 feet along its length. Those who begin at the northern terminus at Daniel Boone Scout Camp will save 800 feet of climbing, but will have to climb a bit over 3000 feet with a full pack on the first day. I was fortunate to have four days to hike, making the trip considerably easier and more enjoyable than those who force the trail into a weekend.

I had spent the previous day with my family, staging my truck at Camp Daniel Boone and enjoying the sights in the Forest and around Brevard, North Carolina where the trail begins. That Sunday morning, we spent several minutes watching Looking Glass Falls. My daughter was especially enchanted.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0003_zpsb7f30a5c.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0003_zpsb7f30a5c.jpg.html)

Then we headed down to the turn for Davidson River Campground. The trailhead for the ALT is actually well before the campground, on the left as soon as you turn into the campground complex. The parking lot was large and the area was being used by an assortment of runners, cyclists, and day hikers. Dewey paused for a moment for a photo with my pack.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0006_zps28e830ba.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0006_zps28e830ba.jpg.html)

Then we stepped off to the smoothest trail of the entire hike, wide, smooth and easy. In a few hundred yards, we crossed an elaborate bridge over the Davison River.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0008_zpsa85b248d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0008_zpsa85b248d.jpg.html)

The smooth trail continued for another half mile perhaps, before it turned sharply up a steep hill. This first quarter mile of climbing seemed among the steepest of the whole hike, though maybe it was just my out-of-hiking-shape body protesting. Over the next mile or so, the climbs mellowed, though they definitely continued.

Soon I arrived at FS 5002, a grassy road bed with the south of the last confirmed water source before my intended camp for the night. I walked down to the loud stream where it flowed under the road through a culvert. I headed down on the left side to fill up with a couple of quarts of water to see me the remaining 6-7 miles to camp. Then I walked back, looking for where the trail resumed on the opposite side of the road. It turned out I had walked past it while looking for water.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0012_zps09dae527.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0012_zps09dae527.jpg.html)

I continued on at a slow but steady pace with multiple short climbs, followed by shorter descents along the ridgeline. Around 2 PM, I stopped for lunch at a break in the otherwise brushy growth alongside the trail. Dewey, who views chocolate as the ultimate snacking power in the universe, was not impressed with my autumn themed lunch of spiced cider with peanut butter and pumpkin butter on a pita.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0014_zps44b0a2e4.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0014_zps44b0a2e4.jpg.html)

About 4:30, I reached the massive cliff face of Cedar Rock Mountain that would lead another half-mile to my home for the evening at Butter Gap.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0016_zps8f78bbb0.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0016_zps8f78bbb0.jpg.html)

This area is popular with climbers, and a number of excellent campsites began to appear.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0017_zps26a34b8d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0017_zps26a34b8d.jpg.html)

I also began to cross streams that I did not expect to flow since they were listed as seasonal on the map. Of the three I crossed, the middle offered the best flow and deepest pool to draw from. I would later wish I had gotten my water from there. Still, it was only a few more minutes before I arrived at Butter Gap Shelter.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0020_zps9611b635.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0020_zps9611b635.jpg.html)

The shelter was in very rough shape with holes covered by blue tarp. The spring was right next to the shelter and fairly low in flow. It took me about 20 minutes to fill up a gallon for the evening. Even so, I had my home for the night in good order in just another 15 minutes.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0023_zps5f49051a.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0023_zps5f49051a.jpg.html)

Afterward, I changed into dry clothes. The cool, sunny day was turning into a cooler twilight as I boiled water for my dinner of chipotle cheddar bacon potatoes with chicken.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0022_zps7528bd28.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0022_zps7528bd28.jpg.html)

I could hear a group of campers nearby, at one point singing happy birthday to a member of their group. However, I never saw them. Once dinner was over, I packed all by gear away, hung my food bag on the bear cables next to the shelter, and settled in to read a bit, then sleep. This first day of 8-9 miles and about 2300 feet of climbing was over.

Bearpaw
2013-10-26, 23:53
Monday, October 21, 2013

I arose and began packing up. I had spent much of the previous afternoon tired from a couple of nights of poor sleep. This, combined with a focus on the mundane needs of camp chores, had kept me from really appreciating the beauty of this campsite. As I sat of the platform of the shelter eating breakfast, I was struck by how pretty the colors were, here at 3500 feet.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0024_zps049b8be9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0024_zps049b8be9.jpg.html)

I stepped off about 8:30. I was facing a reasonably short day, 7 miles give or take, but nearly 2800 feet of climbing, most of it on the rather steep ascent up Pilot Mountain.

Within a quarter mile of the shelter, I hit the trail intersection at Butter Gap. An unmapped trail led up the ridge to Cedar Rock on my right. I was sure my unseen campers were up this trail. I turned left on the ALT heading toward Chestnut Mountain. As I began the uphill climb, I met my first other backpackers of the trip, four young men heading south. They had dry camped on top of Chestnut the night before and were heading out at Davidson River. Once I reached the summit of Chestnut, I quickly found their nice campsite.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0026_zpsb729f947.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0026_zpsb729f947.jpg.html)

I pushed on through the morning, arriving at the intersection of FS 471 & FS 475.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0028_zps1dbbfce9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0028_zps1dbbfce9.jpg.html)

I pushed across and walked up the ALT right next to the stop sign at the intersection. I found a nice shelf about ten feet above the roads and ate lunch while watching cars and mountain biker cruise by below. Then I packed up and began the 1800 foot climb up Pilot Mountain. The peanut butter lunch powered me up with more confidence than I expected. Still, I was beginning to feel mighty humble by the time I reached the rock slab summit.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0031_zps0e191719.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0031_zps0e191719.jpg.html)

Celebrating the climb, I smugly posed for a selfie.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0033_zps954c48a6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0033_zps954c48a6.jpg.html)

The summit also gave me a great view of iconic Looking Glass Rock.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0032_zps649867bb.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0032_zps649867bb.jpg.html)

The 300-degree view also offered a vantage point down to sweeping fields of fall color.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0034_zps27b8acb2.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0034_zps27b8acb2.jpg.html)

After a few glorious minutes of this awesome view all to myself, I headed down. My home for the night was waiting at Deep Gap Shelter. I reached the gap. And no shelter. I continued on another couple hundred yards and reached an intersection. A great little pool from a spring awaited me as well, the first water since leaving Butter Gap that morning. Two severely faded signs read “by-pass” to the right and “shelter” to the left. Another 200 yards of uphill climbing brought me to the shelter.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0037_zpsd617c616.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0037_zpsd617c616.jpg.html)

It was in much better shape than Butter Gap, though it was criss-crossed by a myriad of trails. To the front of the shelter were trails leading down to springs, but none were as good as the pool at the signed intersection. I filled up and returned to the shelter. More roaming revealed that if I stood facing into the shelter, the trail going uphill at about 2 o’clock was the ALT I would need to take the next morning. There were no blazes until I walked a good 300 yard up the way.

Once I returned to the shelter, I set up home for the night.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0036_zps0e9d9ffd.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0036_zps0e9d9ffd.jpg.html)

A dinner of ramen with salmon followed, then I turned in to read. As dusk wandered in, so did misty skies.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0040_zps346d07ae.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0040_zps346d07ae.jpg.html)

Fortunately, I knew the worst of the night’s cold, forecast to dip below freezing, would settle into the valleys below. I settled into a warm night’s sleep.

Bearpaw
2013-10-26, 23:54
Tuesday, October 22, 2013

I awoke at 5 AM to the first drops of rain. I quickly staked out the hanging flap of my tarp and went back to sleep, awaking at 7 AM to dry, but overcast skies. I packed up, ate breakfast in the shelter, and stepped off a little after 8 AM. I knew this would be my toughest day of hiking, 8 miles or so with about nearly 3000 feet of climbing altogether. But I also knew Black Balsam Knob and Tennant Mountain were balds that would likely offer excellent autumn views.

I stepped off confidently after another excellent night of sleep. Three miles up a 1400 foot ascent would bring me to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Good rest and good food carried up the climb with remarkably little effort, a cold wind the only detracting quality of the walk. As I began to hear the noise of BRP traffic, a seeming gateway of conifers led me forward.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0044_zps998ffef1.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0044_zps998ffef1.jpg.html)

I stopped for lunch at rock above the Parkway.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0045_zps64af7280.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0045_zps64af7280.jpg.html)

Then I crossed the road and began what I have termed the “Dog Turd Climb”. This insane climb to the ridgetop, 500 feet in about .3 miles is a lot like a dog turd. If you just bear down and grunt your way through it, it doesn’t last very long. But it’s pretty awful along the way and leaves a very, very bad taste in your mouth for quite a while.

Once at the top, the trail merges with the Mountains-to-Sea Trail for the next mile. Despite the aggravation of the climb, there were some rewards in this one-mile section. It was wonderfully level. I encountered the first of a number of trees with perfect red berry clusters.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0048_zpsc31d04bd.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0048_zpsc31d04bd.jpg.html)

There were a couple of nice cliff-top views.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0050_zpsdb9ee282.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0050_zpsdb9ee282.jpg.html)

The trail began to open up, revealing glimpses of the bald ridgeline ahead.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0051_zpscb33021d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0051_zpscb33021d.jpg.html)

And just before reaching the paved FS 816, trailhead for the swarms of dayhikers that cover the balds, I enjoyed two perfect conifer flats that could provide campsites to several scout troops.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0053_zps30233fb5.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0053_zps30233fb5.jpg.html)

Once across the road, I grabbed a snack and pulled on my windshirt. Then I headed up the ridge to join herds of hikers as they absorbed the glory of a Smoky Mountain fall.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0059_zpse6bb3775.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0059_zpse6bb3775.jpg.html)

I made my way fairly quickly up to the Summit of Black Balsam Knob.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0060_zps75c2e709.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0060_zps75c2e709.jpg.html)

Dewey pushed his way through the 15-20 hikers at the summit for his own snapshot.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0061_zpsc8b40248.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0061_zpsc8b40248.jpg.html)

Just past the summit, I was also happily surprised to learn that the afternoon’s walk included much more than just the open summits of Black Balsam and Tennent Mountain. The entire final four miles to camp was along balds, including Cove Top and Flower Knob, all the way to my camp near Shining Rock Gap.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0063_zps102aa6b6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0063_zps102aa6b6.jpg.html)

I even got another excellent view down to Looking Glass Rock again.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0066_zps7296e145.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0066_zps7296e145.jpg.html)

I wandered on in a happy sort of daze wandering among day hiker and wilderness therapy groups that dotted the area. Eventually, the crowds thinned as I reached the boundary of Shining Rock Wilderness at the base of Cove Top.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0068_zps2af72746.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0068_zps2af72746.jpg.html)

As I crested the eastern side of Cove Top, I could see ahead to Shining Rock, the huge white quartz deposit that earned the area its name.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0069_zpse0bfa318.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0069_zpse0bfa318.jpg.html)

I saw one more hiking couple in the distance as I approached Flower Knob, then I was alone as trees began to rise around the trail once again. I glanced over to my right at a series of rock steps. I realized they headed down to a beautiful spring, the first water in 8 miles.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0071_zpsb42e957e.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0071_zpsb42e957e.jpg.html)

I climbed down and filled my bottles with a full gallon. Part of me had considered pushing on the remaining 6 miles down to my truck. But it was 3:45 and I was tired. I knew from talking to a man who had hiked from Camp Daniel Boone up to Cold Mountain that the final three miles downhill was rocky. I decided not to risk rushing down rocky terrain while tired, racing to beat darkness back to my truck.

Another couple hundred yards and I glanced down to my right at a beautiful piped spring. To the left was a somewhat barren muddy trail uphill. My gut said a decent campsite might be waiting there. It was more than merely decent.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0074_zps8dc72bed.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0074_zps8dc72bed.jpg.html)

The golden leaves above my hammock made the view as luxurious as the comfort beneath me.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0075_zps35483d51.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0075_zps35483d51.jpg.html)

It was cool, but I read a while, then cooked and ate. Then I returned to my hammock to read some more. Despite the chill in the air, I was too warm. I stripped to my base layer stuck out a leg and both arms and continued to read. At one point, I heard two young men walk by below me on the trail. I could clearly hear their conversation as they headed on. Where they came from or went I never found out. I finally drifted off around 10 PM, only to awaken at 1 PM, chilled. I pulled my quilt back around me and drifted back to a dead slumber.

Bearpaw
2013-10-26, 23:56
Wednesday, October 23, 2013

My alarm rang at 6:15 AM. I arose and packed up in the dark, eating my breakfast quickly while the wind howled away. I stepped off about 7:20, with dawn’s first light breaking over the horizon.
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I pushed along by headlamp to see the roots and rocks below. Soon I arrived at the rocky base of Shining Rock.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0077_zpsebc8f0fd.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0077_zpsebc8f0fd.jpg.html)

I knew something was wrong, as the trail began to move up to the east. The ALT was supposed to follow to the west of the ridge. I backtracked to a little clearing I had passed, big enough for maybe four tents. In the brighter light of morning, I could now see two trails veering off from the other side of the clearing. The one to the right was the ALT. Taking a wrong turn was very easy in this wilderness area as there were no blazes or signs allowed.

I pressed on, quickly passing the third great spring in the Shining Rock Gap area. Then I pushed on along. A couple of small climbs gave way to my first downhill of the morning. Here, I got my only good look at Cold Mountain, made famous in both the book and movie.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0081_zps8b171465.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0081_zps8b171465.jpg.html)

I continued on to the “Narrows”, an extremely rocky stretch on the side of the ridge. I was a bit winded with sore legs just working my way down this sort stretch, though it did offer my best view of the day.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0082_zps55c73ae3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0082_zps55c73ae3.jpg.html)

The trail eased up a bit as I reached Deep Gap before the spur trail up Cold Mountain. I thought I had reached the trail intersection at a nice campsite. I turned and walked down the trail, only to find it disappeared. I backtracked again and continued north toward Cold Mountain. One tiny hill, and I arrived at another, smaller campsite. Here, someone had built a small cairn to mark the unremarkable left turn downhill. They had even gone to the effort of taping the cairn in place.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0084_zpsccd3491e.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0084_zpsccd3491e.jpg.html)

I had already descended a little over 1000 feet in the first three miles of my day. Now I would drop nearly 2000 more over my last three miles. Some stretches were choked with roots and rocks. Some were smooth and gentle downhills. Some were short uphills, one significant enough to require a series of wood steps to form a ladder.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0087_zps1386fff7.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0087_zps1386fff7.jpg.html)

I uttered an oath in honor of Bill Bryson, something to the effect of “You gotta be ##$#### me!”, then I moved on. Along the way, I encountered three good streams. The middle one, about halfway down the descent, formed actual waterfalls.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0086_zpsfedc042f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0086_zpsfedc042f.jpg.html)

I filled a bottle from one pool and continued on. About 11:30, I dropped down to the gravel road where I had left my truck at Daniel Boone. Dewey and I stopped long enough for a picture at the trailhead.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/bearpawat99/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0088_zpsc76a18d6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/bearpawat99/media/Art%20Loeb%20Trail/DSCN0088_zpsc76a18d6.jpg.html)

Then we packed up and headed home.

Rasty
2013-10-27, 00:19
Nice trip report. Its a great trail and I need to get back to it again.

Crikey
2013-10-27, 00:19
Very cool.

Roche
2013-10-27, 09:03
Great report BP, we all need to hire you as the ghost writer for our trips.

sheepdog
2013-10-28, 00:34
To all you rookies.......the proper response is



you suck.....



such a nice trip....wish I was there......therefor you suck

Rasty
2013-10-28, 10:07
To all you rookies.......the proper response is



you suck.....



such a nice trip....wish I was there......therefor you suck

What about if you've been there already three times?

Hog On Ice
2013-10-28, 10:13
pics or it don't count as suckage

john pickett
2013-10-28, 12:57
One thing I've never bothered to do, learn how to post pictures on any site except facebook; and that I do infrequently. The big advantage is I have no reason to carry a camera or smart phone so my pack is a little lighter. I carry the photos I would have taken in my head.

Bearpaw
2013-10-28, 14:31
One thing I've never bothered to do, learn how to post pictures on any site except facebook; and that I do infrequently. The big advantage is I have no reason to carry a camera or smart phone so my pack is a little lighter. I carry the photos I would have taken in my head.

Maybe, but there are times I sit back and look at old albums or read or trip reports and the memories are pretty much always awesome, and sharper for the image.

Rasty
2013-10-28, 14:42
Maybe, but there are times I sit back and look at old albums or read or trip reports and the memories are pretty much always awesome, and sharper for the image.

So you have CRS also?

Crikey
2013-10-28, 16:00
The Shining Rock area is a challenge to navigate. We climbed up the Old Butt Knob trail (a freakin' ballbuster of a climb) and had lunch on Shining Rock. We wanted to come back down the Shining Creek trail. Had it not been for this website, and the hand drawn map of the trails, no way in hell would we have noticed the turn down Shining Creek.

http://www.southeastclimbing.com/images/shining_rock_trails.gif

http://www.southeastclimbing.com/climbing_areas/north_carolina/cold_mt.htm

Rasty
2013-10-28, 16:52
The Shining Rock area is a challenge to navigate. We climbed up the Old Butt Knob trail (a freakin' ballbuster of a climb) and had lunch on Shining Rock. We wanted to come back down the Shining Creek trail. Had it not been for this website, and the hand drawn map of the trails, no way in hell would we have noticed the turn down Shining Creek.

http://www.southeastclimbing.com/images/shining_rock_trails.gif

http://www.southeastclimbing.com/climbing_areas/north_carolina/cold_mt.htm

That's the best part about shining rock. I used the same site for good info.

Bearpaw
2013-10-28, 17:32
The Shining Rock area is a challenge to navigate. We climbed up the Old Butt Knob trail (a freakin' ballbuster of a climb) and had lunch on Shining Rock. We wanted to come back down the Shining Creek trail. Had it not been for this website, and the hand drawn map of the trails, no way in hell would we have noticed the turn down Shining Creek.

http://www.southeastclimbing.com/images/shining_rock_trails.gif

http://www.southeastclimbing.com/climbing_areas/north_carolina/cold_mt.htm

The photo of the hiker heading south with the three trails and false trail is definitely an older one. Now the opening is only big enough to maybe tuck in four tents. I missed it in the dark on my last morning, ending up at the base of Shining Rocks. Wasn't bad once I backtracked, but started me off kinda poorly.

Bearpaw
2013-10-28, 17:36
So you have CRS also?

I like to think I have a great memory, but if I don't take LOTS of pictures, I forget lots of details when I write a report, just a few days after hiking. A year or two later,yeah, it's amazing details I've forgotten.