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View Full Version : Good Camper-Camping with kids inland NW



dave.imus.3
2015-01-01, 23:21
We live near Spokane WA and are always looking for interesting places to camp. We have 3 kids so lots of things to do near by are a must. We find ourselves camping on the CDA River in the Panhandle National Forest a lot but we are looking forward to your suggestions!!!http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/01/01/7f8b30e4b4dae2d4b7253e51cdce7001.jpg



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Sargevining
2015-01-02, 11:47
Yah. But is it Ultralight?

dave.imus.3
2015-01-02, 13:46
The camper?? No, it is a 16 footer from 1972


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dave.imus.3
2015-01-02, 13:46
Probably 2500lbs or so


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Sargevining
2015-01-03, 01:33
So its not Ti?

Rosaleen
2015-01-11, 09:04
Good for you, taking the kids camping! My kids liked camping enough that I sometimes took them to state parks without hubby, maybe with a couple of their friends. WA is outside of my range and experience, but you may want to look for parks with nature programs.

My boys liked cooking over a fire, so simple foods that can go on a stick are great: Hot dogs, "kabobs," biscuit dough/bread, etc., are easy enough. The great thing about wieners is they are already cooked, so no worries about undercooked meat. Zucchini, tomatoes, etc., on a skewer or in a griddle basket are edible raw, so they also will be OK if not cooked through. A hot dog wrapped with canned biscuit dough is super-easy to make and not much trouble to cook. More campfire-foods, s'mores, foil packets of meat and veggies in the embers, eggs or ground meat in cups made from peppers, onions, oranges, etc. You should be able to find ideas and cooking instructions for all of these and more on the web. Teach the kids how to cook eggs and bacon in a paper bag. That is quite a novelty, but it does eat up time.

Find a nature guide with good illustrations, pick a few known to be common in your target area, and have the kids find them on a short hike. You may want to print up a list with pictures ahead of time, then give each child a sheet to check off if s/he spots the objects. Maybe the child who first spots the plant, animal, track, whatever from the list, checks it off. Whoever finds the most of these gets some "coveted award" for that trip. You could make it a family trophy that gets passed on to the next winner another day or trip. Maybe the prize is a special head lamp or a gag prize like a rubber chicken, named the "Golden Cluck." Even having the honor of lighting a campfire or being excused from KP can get kids going if you play it up.

Most importantly, enjoy! Our children grow up and away far too quickly.

Rosaleen

Ray
2015-01-11, 09:19
This site (http://www.rvparkreviews.com/) has a great list of RV camping sites in the states we've traveled, including state parks and forests, small independent campgrounds and other 'hidden' sites not listed in directories like KOA or Good Sams.

SGT Rock
2015-01-11, 15:48
The camper?? No, it is a 16 footer from 1972


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Retro backpacking using 1970s gear. I've heard about this movement.

Superman
2015-01-11, 16:08
Retro backpacking using 1970s gear. I've heard about this movement.

I have an exterior 1972 aluminum frame pack that is still as good as anything else I've hiked with. In Vietnam all I had was stuff made with canvas and steel.

SGT Rock
2015-01-11, 16:29
I ran into an AT thru-hiker on the trail that had an old Kelty frame pack like my aunt still occasionally uses. I got into a conversation with him, turns out nearly all his gear was 1970's stuff. He said there were a few hikers doing this sort of thing on the trail this year.

Superman
2015-01-11, 17:39
I ran into an AT thru-hiker on the trail that had an old Kelty frame pack like my aunt still occasionally uses. I got into a conversation with him, turns out nearly all his gear was 1970's stuff. He said there were a few hikers doing this sort of thing on the trail this year.

There is an assumption that only new stuff is light and what to carry. My pack was lighter in the 70s that what I started with in 2000. 100lb of light weight gear is still 100lb.

SGT Rock
2015-01-11, 18:06
I remember some of those old aluminum frame nylon packs being pretty darn light. My first one didn't even have a hip belt though.

Superman
2015-01-11, 18:46
I remember some of those old aluminum frame nylon packs being pretty darn light. My first one didn't even have a hip belt though.

They were so easy to modify to the individual. Pins held everything on so if you wanted no waste belt or a bigger belt no problem. If the shoulder straps were right just swap them out. It the bag was too big or too small no problem.

Tin Man
2015-01-11, 23:47
I remember some of those old aluminum frame nylon packs being pretty darn light. My first one didn't even have a hip belt though.

when i first joined the boy scouts, i carried a canvas rucksack with no frame. mom loaded me down with canned pork and beans and spaghetti o's. that first hike, i was in tears and at the end of the line. after hiking 7 miles and dropping the pack, i felt i would float away i felt so light. those pork and beans heated over the campfire were damn good. i had just turned 11 and never dreamt of quitting. but mom and i had a talk after. i told her what was what and before long i had a framed pack, still canvas, and a no canned food policy.

atraildreamer
2015-01-18, 18:45
when i first joined the boy scouts, i carried a canvas rucksack with no frame. mom loaded me down with canned pork and beans and spaghetti o's. that first hike, i was in tears and at the end of the line. after hiking 7 miles and dropping the pack, i felt i would float away i felt so light. those pork and beans heated over the campfire were damn good. i had just turned 11 and never dreamt of quitting. but mom and i had a talk after. i told her what was what and before long i had a framed pack, still canvas, and a no canned food policy.

When I was in the scouts, we used to make up a meal of a hamburger, a sliced potato and another vegetable along with a pat of butter and a little water, all wrapped in foil. We would get a fire going and let it burn down to coals. We would then put the foil pack in the coals and put some more kindling on top and let that burn down over the foil pack.

About 20 minutes later, when you heard steam coming from the foil pack, dinner was done!

We would cut a small branch to use as an eating utensil, like a primitive spork.

We then would cut open the top of the foil pack and ate right out of the package, enjoying a hot dinner in the woods!

Tin Man
2015-01-18, 20:08
I did a similar meal with chicken, carrots, potatoes and onions. Still make that on section hikes. Very good!