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View Full Version : Resupply - Getting Food & Other Neccessities



Kozmic Zian
2004-07-09, 10:22
Yea......Town Stops....It usually depends on so many variables, like how long you're gonna be out for, where's the next stop, your diet, etc. If I'm on the AT, I use the guide book and maps to determine when and how many days to the next town with re-supply facilities. I try to carry enough food for the number of days to the next stop. Taking into account a morning, noon, and evening meal. Three meals a day + snacks for however many days.Trying to keep this amt. of food as light and compact as possible.....sometimes choice over what I purchase is controlled by how much it weighs, or will it crush to crumbs, will it pack into a ziplock (everything is taken out of the packing and placed in ziplock bags). If not on a trail like the AT, with guide books, etc....You have to know how many days out, and where the next town is for resupply. To not plan these things can be foolish and dangerous. Hiking for multiple days is always a set of strategies, with gear plans, time, distance, resupply, etc. Planning is essential to successful, safe and happy experiences. Good Hiking, KZ@

SGT Rock
2004-07-10, 18:45
How many of y'all have ever chashed food on a hike. I know this sort of thing wouldn't work for a throught or something that long. But on the Pinhoti I was contemplating doing a cashe at the halfway point next time I do it.

Bimmer
2004-07-11, 23:09
On the first section hike that I did with my brother, we had 2 cars and left one in the middle to use as a resupply stop for clothes and food. Resupply day was a 13 mile hike day as well, and by the time we repositioned cars so we would have one on the end, we ended up doing the last 2 miles in the dark! We decided that there were probably better ways to lighten the load and looked at lighter equipment for our next hike.

I do wish they would put garbage cans at all road crossings though. There is nothing worse than carrying your trash while passing through civilization. ;) We thought about hanging our garbage by the road and coming back for it when we finished our section. If you can hang food, why not hang garbage? After all don't we hang garbage when we hang our food every night on the trail? I think we did not leave the garbarge because we were afraid we would not come back for it in our rush to get back to families and work. Wait a minute - I thought we were rushing TO the trail to get away from that stuff! :confused:

smokymtnsteve
2004-07-13, 00:25
I have cached food and equipment up in the smokies.



Pink dancin elephant :elefant: :love:


www.elephantrock.com

SGT Rock
2004-07-13, 12:43
I have cached food and equipment up in the smokies.



I need to find that - imagine all the good coffee beans and such waiting to be found in the Smokies :coffee: :tee:

All I have to do is look for the right plants to look under :canabis:

smokymtnsteve
2004-07-18, 00:02
I used to help run a campground up on the cherokee reservation and the laurel gap shelter was only about a 5 mile drive and then a 4.5 mile walk..I left an old sleeping bag and stove and latern up there so all I had to tote was my food for the evening, I got where i could walk up in about a 1.5 hours so I went up there a lot.

Redleg
2004-07-18, 21:35
Borrow a copy of Ray Jardine's "Beyond Backpacking" read it and extract the Philosophy from the practicalities. He suggests that you mail yourself (In care of a friend, pro shop, resort, etc.) those resupply items that you suspect that you might not be able to get from local purchase (fuel, socks, shoes, food, etc.) All it takes is a lot of long distance phone calls, and a kind strainger on the recieving end.
Checklists, route planning (What if you get there late Saterday and hav to wait till 10 am Monday for him to open?)
jaf.

MinnesotaSmith
2004-11-24, 14:23
No one ever says what kind of container they put it in. It would need to be waterproof, able to be buried and not rupture, proof against buried animals, and not a problem with disposal/portage once uncovered and emptied. What would work with those requirements?

dropkick
2005-06-28, 05:21
I've cached supplies before but never food. Couldn't ever figure out a safe way to store the food that didn't involve a bunch of containers that would need packing out.
If anyone has any ideas about some way to do this that would be safe from the animals getting into it (2 legged, 4 legged, and creepy crawlies) I would really like to hear about it.

Seeker
2005-06-28, 17:50
I've cached supplies before but never food. Couldn't ever figure out a safe way to store the food that didn't involve a bunch of containers that would need packing out.
If anyone has any ideas about some way to do this that would be safe from the animals getting into it (2 legged, 4 legged, and creepy crawlies) I would really like to hear about it.

have never done it myself, but i'm trying to envision something like a mid-trip resupply on a stretch of trail near a crossroad or trail junction, where you're not having to carry something more than a half mile or so. a 5-gal bucket with lid would work... empty the cache, rebury it, and then go back and recover your containers after the hike. or leave them alone for the next time you use that route.

an army surplus waterproof bag might work too (heavy nylon bag with a rubberized interior. about 14" across, and maybe 18" of useable height. comfortably fits one of those horrid army sleeping bags inside).

a 40mm ammo can (surplus) is waterproof too... about 8" wide, and about 16" square, i think. 5.56, 7.62, and cal.50 are probably too small. now i'm thinking again, and old mortar casings come to mind... not the little black tubes, but the actual wooden packing crate... not waterproof, but portable, and would do fine with a plastic bag inside. the mortar boxes were sort of flat, but there was some sort of thing, grenades maybe? that comes in a crate that's about 18" square... anyway, the point is, old surplus wooden boxes with a plastic bag inside.

bird dog
2005-06-28, 23:30
Rock and Seeker - When I was in the 509th, we cached TONS of stuff every rotation. You could probably dig anywhere in the training area at Polk and find whatever you need! If I remember correctly, we used ammo cans (40mm) and old mortar tubes like Seeker was saying. Worked well, but the 5 gallon water cans that we put out weeks prior to the rotation were treated with a very small amount of something to keep them fresh. It tasted like clorox when we finally drank it.....Burned all the way down. Bird Dog

Seeker
2005-06-29, 02:39
Rock and Seeker - When I was in the 509th, we cached TONS of stuff every rotation. You could probably dig anywhere in the training area at Polk and find whatever you need! If I remember correctly, we used ammo cans (40mm) and old mortar tubes like Seeker was saying. Worked well, but the 5 gallon water cans that we put out weeks prior to the rotation were treated with a very small amount of something to keep them fresh. It tasted like clorox when we finally drank it.....Burned all the way down. Bird Dog

yeah, they still do that... and blufor finds stuff they hid three rotations back and think it's pertinent to the current one... sort of funny, actually... from my perspective as a white hat guy...

SGT Rock
2005-06-29, 10:06
Rock and Seeker - When I was in the 509th, we cached TONS of stuff every rotation. You could probably dig anywhere in the training area at Polk and find whatever you need! If I remember correctly, we used ammo cans (40mm) and old mortar tubes like Seeker was saying. Worked well, but the 5 gallon water cans that we put out weeks prior to the rotation were treated with a very small amount of something to keep them fresh. It tasted like clorox when we finally drank it.....Burned all the way down. Bird Dog

We did a rotation in 2002 and used the advantage of being stationed at Polk in the field exercises prior too it to find and destroy as many caches as we could. I'm sure one troop didn't make a huge dent, but it was enough at the beginning. In Peason we didn't get any indirect for two to three days because we had taken all their mortar ammo in the area. Something else we also did is use the OPFOR cache mortar ammo tootsie rolls since they were conveniently marked with 81mm instead of 82mm. We never ran out of mortar ammo the entire rotation - in fact, for about 3 days we only shot 81mm and were responsible for providing indirect for much of the squadron.

The water probably had bleach in it.

Seeker
2005-06-29, 11:48
i remember that one... you guys crushed everything in peason, then into fullerton, through carnis, across to shughart-gordon, and then over to huffton... i was watching from the jtoc. awesome rotation.

bird dog
2005-06-29, 19:43
Rock - Nice. As an alumni of both sides (OPFOR and BLUFOR) I can appreciate that. However, dont confuse my allegiance....It was and is with the 2d ACR. Bird Dog

SGT Rock
2005-06-30, 20:30
i remember that one... you guys crushed everything in peason, then into fullerton, through carnis, across to shughart-gordon, and then over to huffton... i was watching from the jtoc. awesome rotation.

It was fun. After 20 years of various rotations with different ROEs and OPFOR I would have to say that the JRTC has it figured out the best and offered the best, most realistic, and toughest rotation I have seen. Just my personal opinion as an OC-T, but the Army needs to standardized ROE as much as possible and the JRTC ROE would be my first choice for basis.

Seeker
2005-07-01, 01:11
thanks... we try. it wasn't my rotation, but i know the guys that wrote it. i just worked a shift for it. things have changed there, internally, in the past year or so, but it's still the best training our troops can get anywhere.