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Verlager
2004-08-16, 15:10
The HH (Hennessey Hammock) is cleverly engineered and easy to set up. However, I got into real trouble one cold night when I decided to sleep in my Hennessey Hammock Asym Deluxe and used a Thermarest Ultralite Self-inflating pad, size: 21" x 48". There was insufficient friction between the Thermarest pad and the hammock bed and the Thermarest pad had slipped out from under me. In my confusion, I rolled, thinking that up was down, etc. I woke up face-down in the upside-down hammock with the netting below me and the bed above me. I relaxed and tried to reason my way out of this jam, but my legs and arm were trapped in the spinning, twisted nylon.

I thought, "Well, it's for just situations like these that I always sleep with a serrated-edge Spyderco knife." But the knife wasn't to be found, and I was getting claustrophobic, and worried about strangling myself. The more I moved the tighter the nylon gripped me. I was scared. When I got out, the bed was torn, and the bug netting also had damage. My GF repaired both with a needle and nylon thread.

Moral: think about a TETHERKNIFE next time you go into a hammock.

katesdad
2004-09-09, 10:38
Having the fear of much the same happening to me, I've started using a tent peg and a length of parachute cord to anchor the thing from flipping.

Just tie a length (I find 3 feet enough to allow the thing to sway a bit) to the middle of the bottom of the hammock and peg the other end. Adjust the legnth depending on how much ground clearance you use.

It's worked so far, though I ain't waiting til 2 am to test it!!

Larry

Lanthar
2004-09-09, 16:11
:biggrin: geez... that would suck... be awful funny to think back on though...

youngblood
2004-09-23, 21:30
Verlager,

I don't know exactly what you did to get in that situation... but don't do it again! :biggrin:

Youngblood

bird dog
2004-09-24, 19:52
we used to duct tape guys in their hammocks when I was in the military and swing them jump rope style..Now that you have put it that way, I can see how they must have felt!

Nomad
2005-02-17, 12:51
Great. Now I'll have a phobia of sharks....and hammocks.

Turk
2005-03-01, 19:22
Instead of sewing the netting back up you could have sewn in a second velcro escape hatch in the netting.

I was thinking about this the day I got my hammock. But being new to the whole system, I did not want to ask an embarassing rookie question from the veteran HH users around me.

NiteShiner
2005-03-22, 20:53
I wondered about the hammock. Glad I know 'the rest of the story' now before going out and getting something that could put a damper on my day/night. Thanks for educating me.

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-23, 01:03
I wondered about the hammock. Glad I know 'the rest of the story' now before going out and getting something that could put a damper on my day/night. Thanks for educating me.
I would not be very concerned about flipping over. While I have no doubt it can happen, I have never had any problem with this. Besides the comfort is well worth the risk.

NiteShiner
2005-03-23, 02:21
Ok. I may still try the hammock if you can help me to figure out how I can get the cord tight enough so that I don't slide down to the ground. I'm not a big person, but neither are my muscles. I went to Arkansas last year and camped with my folks. While I was there, I bought a hammock made for two. My daughter- whose muscles out does mine - and I tied it to two trees. As we - yes my daughter decided to put it to the test - layed in the hammock swinging, we could feel it sliding down. We never hit bottom, but we were close. I would tie it above a branch if the trees had branches I could reach. Such was not the case. What do you do?

peter_pan
2005-03-23, 09:22
NiteShiner,

Try wrapping your tree saver straps fully around the tress then tieing in the hammock...the friction should prevent sliding down on all but a steel pole.

Pan

NiteShiner
2005-03-23, 11:16
Tree saver straps? I must have bought the wrong kind of hammock or one that somebody returned without returning everything. Educate me please!

GregH
2005-03-23, 15:25
The "tree-saver" straps come with a Hennessy Hammock. They're simply 2"x42" (exact dimensions at hennessyhammock.com) nylon webbing straps you wrap around the tree or other support.
Absent the straps, wrap your line tightly around the target tree and then tie a taut-line hitch finished with two half hitches. Also, there is a figure-eight lashing that Hennessy recommends and their website has a video which shows how to tie it.

NiteShiner
2005-03-23, 18:44
Thanks. I will have to track down that site after bowling tonight. I can see there is alot to hiking that I never would have dreamed. I thought my biggest problem would be snakes, but I'm starting to change my mind. I think I had better do alot more reading and asking questions before I take on any hike of real distance.

Hog On Ice
2005-03-23, 20:37
Absent the straps, wrap your line tightly around the target tree and then tie a taut-line hitch finished with two half hitches.

what I used to used before the tree hugger straps was the simple twice around the tree and then two half hitches where the second hitch is a slipped hitch

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-23, 22:31
The tree-savers or tree-huggers, what ever you prefer to call them are worth it. I don't know if Hog on Ice has had this problem but I have been approached by rangers in SNP and asked what precautions I used to keep my hammock from damaging the trees. Before I bought my current hammock I used a cheaper version. I would carry two pieces of bicycle inner tube about a foot long. I inserted the rope thru these first, then I wrapped the rope around the tree twice making sure to pass the rope thru the inner tube each time. Then I would use the figure eight with two half hitches to finish setup. I never had any problem with the rope sliding down the tree. Maybe the inner tube provided some traction between the rope and tree.
I presently use the tree huggers and tie the knot as shown on the Hennessy site. no problems. I have included a link to the hennessy site. You can get more info there. http://www.hennessyhammock.com/index.htm

NiteShiner
2005-03-24, 00:40
Wow! That hammock is like none I have ever seen. I can understand now why so many people are turning to hammock camping. I recently bought a sit-on-top kayak. The storage compartment opening isn't very large at all, but I think I would be able to get the hammock in. Now if I could just figure out how to put my bike on the kayak! :) I have a 9' x 9' pop-up tent that I bought last year. It's easy up/easy down, but it does weigh more than the hammock and it takes up more space. I would never be able to fit it in the hole. I like the fact that the Hennesy hammock can be used for more than just one thing. Can you get it at Pro Bass /Bass Pro (whichever)? The inner tube was great. And I hadn't thought about the nylon cord hurting the trees. Thanks for your help.

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-24, 02:16
Wow! That hammock is like none I have ever seen. I can understand now why so many people are turning to hammock camping. I recently bought a sit-on-top kayak. The storage compartment opening isn't very large at all, but I think I would be able to get the hammock in. Now if I could just figure out how to put my bike on the kayak! :) I have a 9' x 9' pop-up tent that I bought last year. It's easy up/easy down, but it does weigh more than the hammock and it takes up more space. I would never be able to fit it in the hole. I like the fact that the Hennesy hammock can be used for more than just one thing. Can you get it at Pro Bass /Bass Pro (whichever)? The inner tube was great. And I hadn't thought about the nylon cord hurting the trees. Thanks for your help.
You would get a better deal if you order direct fron Hennessy while they have some on clearance. I have ordered all of mine direct. I had a friend that bought one in Norfolk but I don't know where he bought it. He is out at sea and I don't know when I will talk to him.
I haven't been in a Bass Pro shop for awhile so I don't know if they have them or not. REI carries them and Campmor may have them as well.

http://www.rei.com/online/store/Search?vcat=REI_SEARCH&stat=7889&langId=-1&storeId=8000&textQuery=hammocks&x=21&y=7

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/StoreCatalogDisplay?storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

GregH
2005-03-25, 11:50
The tree-savers or tree-huggers, what ever you prefer to call them...

I thought the straps were the tree-savers and we're the tree-huggers! :rolleyes:

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-27, 14:33
It might just be me but it seems that huggers often save but savers don't always hug. It gets a bit confusing at times so please don't ask me to explain that. :stupid:

NiteShiner
2005-03-31, 01:12
You made people speechless! :)

NiteShiner
2005-03-31, 01:23
Thanks Rage in a Cage for those addresses. And I do remember Brass Pro having some hammocks the last time I was in there, but now that I don't have my week long headache anymore . . . I will go check them out even more thoroughly. But I still have visions of looking like an ear of corn before it's shucked when thinking of twisting in a hammock. Are hammocks really good for cold weather sleeping?

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-31, 03:22
NS,
First don't think of sleeping in a hammock like being an ear of corn. I prefer the thought of a bear taco or bear pinata when sleeping in SNP and other bear territories. This keeps me alert and on my toes. :elefant: I am glad to here that you are feeling better, I know what it is like to be in pain for extended periods.
To answer your question, cold weather hammocking is a different world from warm weather hammocking. I suggest you research this site for info on cold weather use. I have used mine in all four seasons here in central Virginia (Lake Anna) as well as in the mountains of West Virginia. I have also spent a considerable amount of time, at home in my yard, testing out different pads, bags, clothing, etc. before heading out on the trail with it. I still set it up here at home on the coldest nights to experiment with different set ups. My budget has been low for awhile so I haven't been able to buy or try an under quilt or the Hennessy Super shelter.
I will gladly tell you what I have been using for temps down to 10 degrees, but first I must stress the importance of testing things for yourself at home before you head out to a place that may not be as forgiving. I have seen people that could not seem to find a set up that allowed them to sleep comfortably in the cold and I cannot say whether or not you will like it in the cold. Please understand that I am not questioning your ability, I am simply pointing out that what works for me may kill you. Sorry for the lecture, anyway here is what I use with my Hennessy Backpacker and Expedition:
I use a 3/8 inch closed cell foam pad, full length, under me in the hammock. I have tried using my thermarest but found it to be to much of a hassle to use in the hammock and the width is a little narrow, I couldn't stay on it.
For temps down to 25 degrees I use my old 20 degree down bag.
For temps below 25 degrees I use a 0 degree quallofil bag. I have used this down to 8 degrees with winds 20 to 25 mph.
While I agree with many others that you can use your bag over you like a quilt, I have found that for me when the temps are below 30 degrees I am warmer when I use the bag in a normal fashion. I attribute this to two things.
1. By using in a normal fashion I eliminate possible gaps to the sides that would allow air in.
2. Even though the insulation in the sleeping bag is crushed below me I believe that it does do some good. Think about it, The insulation will be crushed mostly in the heaviest contact areas of the body. For example the shoulders, butt and feet. Under the back and legs you may gain 1/4 to 1/2 inch of insulation. While I believe that an under quilt would be a better solution, I must work with what I own. I think SGT Rock has found that a double pad thickness in the trunk region of the body helps to do basically what the bag is doing for me. That info should be here on the site or maybe the Sgt. will chime in later.
Now for the clothing. I usually wear poly pro thermals with micro-fleece over top. I have slept with a shirt and pants over this combo and without. I was warm either way but found I prefer to be able roll out of the hammock fully clothed to answer natures call or when I get up for the day. I also wear either my thorlo hiking socks or a pair of wool socks. Also since I rarely use the hood on my bag I normally wear a barclava(sp?) on my head. I often keep a shirt in the hammock just in case I get cool during the night but have never used it.
That is what I use. I some times tie the fly tight down to the hammock if it is going to be windy or a chance of precipitation. Otherwise I leave an air gap between the fly and hammock. I have found that if I let my body get off of the pad or scoot over tight against the unpadded hammock fabric what ever touches the hammock is going to get cold. When this happens I simply readjust my position and go back to sleep. I also have a habit of shifting my feet in my sleep so that they compress the bags insulation against the side of the hammock. When this happens my feet get cold but once again all I need to do is recenter them and they warm back up. If I am feeling especially wussy, I will sometimes throw one of those hand warmers down in the foot of sleeping bag, but the nights that I tested at the lowest temps I did not do this because I wanted an uncompromising test of my set up.
That is the basics of how I use my hammock in cold weather. I have tried other clothing and sleeping bag combo's, but the above is what I know will work for me down to 8 degrees. If you are handy with a sewing machine there are other options you may choose to try. Also there are lighter solutions to hammocking in the cold. If you have tons of money the options are endless. Others here have experience with some of those solutions so maybe they will chime in. If not start a thread on the subject of cold weather hammocking.
I will stress one more time that sleeping in a hammock in cold weather is tricky, and you should try it at home before putting yourself in a compromising position. The good news is it can be done and for me it is the only way to go as long as I am in Virginia or similar climates.
If I left something out or you have any questions pertaining to this feel free to ask and I will do my best to answer. If you want I can give you links to other sites that have info pertaining to cold weather hammocking, just let me know. :)

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-31, 03:24
You made people speechless! :)
Sadly I often have that effect on people. :confused: :bawling: :biggrin:

GregH
2005-03-31, 12:06
barclava(sp?)

Balaclava.

Hey, I can spell, okay? Great info Rage, thanks.

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-31, 17:50
Balaclava.

Hey, I can spell, okay? Great info Rage, thanks.

Perhaps my spelling was affected by the Daniel Boone "grinning down a bar" story. At times mine has been a "wet bar"clava. You know Multi-purpose. :rolleyes:

Mutinousdoug
2005-03-31, 22:57
I normally wear a barclava

Sound just like Engrish to me.