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cubix
2004-11-26, 23:45
I am thinking of making one. Has anyone made one, the website really doesn't have any plans, I think detailed plants or a better explanation would help me out greatly, if anyone would help me out that would be great.

I am so excited I get my HH in less than a month

Thanks in Advance'

Cubix

youngblood
2004-11-27, 12:35
I am thinking of making one. Has anyone made one, the website really doesn't have any plans, I think detailed plants or a better explanation would help me out greatly, if anyone would help me out that would be great.

I am so excited I get my HH in less than a month

Thanks in Advance'

Cubix

One of Ed Speer's web sites has a link to Garlington's paper. If you go here and scroll down the page you should see it: http://www.hammockcamping.com/ .

Youngblood

cubix
2004-11-28, 02:32
so, All, I need is a 5x8 silio nylon tarp, with 4 loops and a drawstring. In the picture it looks like the foot end is open mostly? then what is the point of the drawstring.

Also, how slippery is silionylon to sew on, can you machine sew or do you have to do it by hand?

Thanks

Cubix

youngblood
2004-11-28, 09:54
so, All, I need is a 5x8 silio nylon tarp, with 4 loops and a drawstring. In the picture it looks like the foot end is open mostly? then what is the point of the drawstring.

Also, how slippery is silionylon to sew on, can you machine sew or do you have to do it by hand?

Thanks

Cubix

Cubix,

Silnylon is slippery and is difficult to work with, but it can be done. Basically you just go slow and careful, while being patient... and you use a sewing machine.

I haven't constructed the Garlington Insulator (GI) but have done basically the same thing using a piece of 1 mil plastic cut from painters drop cloth (which I sometimes carry, primarily as an emergency ground cloth) and with various emerency blankets. With the open top hammock you have, you can easily attach a plastic outer cover and get a feel for how it works. The GI is more difficult to use with the bottom entry Hennessy Hammocks because you have to use the bottom entry to get in and out. That is the reason for the footend being open in the photo you saw... so you can get in or out. Once you are in, you use the drawstrings to close the GI at the footend... you do this in reverse when you want to get out of the hammock. This theme, were you have to pay attention to the bottom entry slot is unavoidable in these type hammocks when you need bottom side insulation.

The GI by itself doesn't claim to add a great deal of warmth, probably around 10 degrees. What it can do is keep the wind from easily robbing you of warmth. What that means is in calm conditions it might be worth 10 degrees of warmth but in breezy conditions you might still get close to the 10 degrees of warmth and also NOT LOSE another 10 or so degrees to the wind easily removing the boundry layer of warm air that you have heated up. Also, since it is windproof it might also help in that regards if the insulation underneath it is not wind proof... some materials block wind and some don't while others.

The GI also allows you to try adding insulation inside it that traps air in smaller pockets and if you can successfully do that you can increase its insulation value higer than the 10 degree number that I threw out there. If you filled it with down, it would work much like the down filled underquilts in that regard. You can fill it with smaller bags or cloths, backpacks, etc and a whole lot of other things... but you have to work out the fit. In a hammock gravity tries to pull everything to the lowest point and the fabric in the hammock bed stretches under your weigh and changes some when you move around.

Of yeah, non-breathable materials like painters plastic drop cloth and silnylon can work against you in regards to mositure buildup (perspiration/condensation) so you have to try balancing it all out to get something that you want. You don't have to use non-breathable material to construct the GI, it is a tradeoff probably involving splash/rain protection, maximum warmth, wind protection and perspiration/condensation buildup. The lightweight silnylon is made from 1.1 ounce ripstop nylon that is impregnated with silicone and weighs about 1.3 ounces (per square yard) after it becomes silnylon. The 1.1 ounce ripstop nylon is also avaliable with a very effective Durable Water Repellent (DWR) treatment that some folks would and do chose for their outter hammock insulation (it still weighs 1.1 ounce after DWR treatment). It is also used for some of the hammock under-blankets.

Youngblood

Lanthar
2004-12-01, 11:01
I wonder if using your hiking staves to maintain some rigidity to the underinsulation might help this... hmm....



The GI also allows you to try adding insulation inside it that traps air in smaller pockets and if you can successfully do that you can increase its insulation value higer than the 10 degree number that I threw out there. If you filled it with down, it would work much like the down filled underquilts in that regard. You can fill it with smaller bags or cloths, backpacks, etc and a whole lot of other things... but you have to work out the fit. In a hammock gravity tries to pull everything to the lowest point and the fabric in the hammock bed stretches under your weigh and changes some when you move around.
Youngblood

cubix
2004-12-02, 17:45
Has anyone auctaly made one of these?

RayGarlington
2005-03-07, 14:43
I have made a few. :biggrin:

sorry to dredge up this old thread, but there really isn't much to making one. If you decide to do it, get some light ripstop about 5 x 9 or 5 x 10 depending on how you want to attach it at the head end. Hem it all around to keep it from fraying.

Head end
The easiest thing to do at the head is just wrap the fabric around the support rope and tie it in place. If you do that you won't have to put corner pull-outs on that end.

Foot end
At the foot end, sew corner pull-out loops at each corner and thread a drawstring through the foot seam. Tie the drawstring to each corner loop, and cut an escape for the drawstring at the mid-point of the foot.

Thats it. When you connect the shell the first time you use it, have someone get in the hammock. Tie the head end in place and position the insulation that you plan to use. Tie the foot-end corner pulls snugly to the hammock support rope with a short piece of string. Pull the draw string closed and tie it to the hammock support line, just tight enough to bring the insulating material up to the back of the person in the hammock. You shouldn't have to adjust the tension on the GI shell again because there really isn't much stress on it.