PDA

View Full Version : Anyone tried a trangia alcohol stove?



Iceman
2004-12-28, 02:17
I just received a trangia stove I ordered off the web, and gave it the backyard work out. Anyone have any thoughs or issues I should be concerned with? Stove seems really well made, burns well, pots all nest nice. I am a bit concerned about fuel consumption. Any thoughs you can share would be appreciated. Thanks

SGT Rock
2004-12-28, 09:21
I tested one, results are here:http://www.hikinghq.net/stoves/trangia.html

Basically it was one of the most fuel efficient stove I ever used. Your set may be different, but the burners are all basically the same.

ezdoesit
2004-12-28, 10:49
Iceman,
This is the only stove I use for my Thru-hikes after trying out all the rest I have always come back to my trustey Trangia Westwing.It burns very well and I have not had one problem with it. :smile: So :dito: to Sgt. Rocks post.

Two Speed
2004-12-28, 21:02
Recently bought a Westwind myself, and have about 7 - 8 days on the trail with it. The fuel efficiency was a bit of a surprise; I carried WAY too much fuel on the first 4 day trip. In mild temps, down to mid or low 30's at night, I used about 2 , maybe 2 1/2 oz a day.

A more experienced hiker said the he had tried and quit using a Trangia due to difficulty lighting the stove in very cold weather. We had a cold snap here in Georgia, down to the low 20's, so I left it outside overnight and tried to light the stove in the morning. Sure enough, it was a bear to light.

I plan to either put the stove (with fuel in it) or a small container of alcohol in my sleeping bag at night if the temperatures are likely to get in the 20 degree range.

SGT Rock
2004-12-28, 21:45
That is a good idea. I find in cold weather I basically have to stick the flame of the lighter in the alcohol. DO NOT DO THIS IN WARM WEATHER!

Douglas
2004-12-28, 21:56
I ordered a triangia as well. I advise you not to leave alchohol fuel in the stove for too long when the lid's on. It wears down the rubber seal. I'd also advise you to make a windscreen. Otherwise, they're great and they work really well.

woodrat
2004-12-29, 00:31
I am considering one myself, I think they make a few different models, any suggestions as too which. Also, how about the military surplus ones any good?.

SGT Rock
2004-12-29, 09:00
I have hear the military surpluss ones aren't as good. I would reccomend getting the westwind and making a new pot stand and windscreen for it.

ezdoesit
2004-12-29, 11:53
Sgt.Rock you suggested making another pot stand for the Trangia.What would you use for the pot stand? And how high would you make it?I have heard that regular hardware cloth is not very good and starts to give off fumes from the galvanized metal is this true? It does seem that if you make a pot stand it would be lighter then the one that came with the Westwind.Inquiring minds want to know. :confused: :biggrin:

SGT Rock
2004-12-29, 12:12
Well I have been making stands from the galvanized hardware cloth for a while now. I made some for 2002 thru-hikers that lasted the whole way and are still on the trail today. True there is a fume issue with galvanized steel, but the amount in a pot stand is so minimal that I doubt this is a problem unless you sit directly over the stove and inhale the fumes all the time. A good option to that would be to get some aluminum gutter flashing that can serve as the windscreen and pot support at the same time with very minimal weight, probably less than just the stand of the Westwind comes with. All it would take to make is a paper hole punch and a pair of scissors. You could make one that uses tent pegs to suplement the support, or with a little extra bending make one that doesn't need them at all like Stove Stomper shows on his site.

Lanthar
2004-12-29, 14:42
someone somewhere had a kit with a new stand and the westwind burner... something like click stand... looking for it...

found it... I'm a retard (http://www.clikstand.com/)

woodrat
2004-12-29, 23:00
way to go lanthar!! great site with great links !. Heres another Q. what do you guys think about controversy over aluminium [ healh wise I mean.

SGT Rock
2004-12-30, 08:40
It is very old stuff, There is a lot of conflicting data out there. Personally I don't worry about it, but I also use Ti.

deadeye
2004-12-30, 13:28
Do be careful and test fully if you try to use aluminum gutter/flashing/cookie sheets as your pot support. I made a combo pot support/windscreen by perforating the stuff (4" aluminum dryer vent duct) with a paper punch - the flame (using a Cat stove) quickly melted the aluminum between the holes! I now stick with hardware cloth for the support with an aluminum cookie sheet windscreen. Pot (MSR Titan), stove, support and windscreen totals 6 oz.

Lanthar
2004-12-30, 15:23
If I remember coorectly, the issue with aluminum is due to bad finishing or insufficient anodizing. I wouldn't have any problems using aluminum, though, like Sgt, I am partial to ti ;). however, I'm strongly considering this kit (http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/hardanodized/50131.html) as it's less expensive and less weight than any comparable ti set that I"ve found...



way to go lanthar!! great site with great links !. Heres another Q. what do you guys think about controversy over aluminium [ healh wise I mean.

Two Speed
2004-12-31, 07:56
. . I have heard that regular hardware cloth is not very good and starts to give off fumes from the galvanized metal is this true? . . .

Before buying my Westwind, I was fooling around making my own alcohol stove (and I might do so again, kind of habit forming), and I noticed the fumes created by heating galvanized hardware cloth seemed pretty nasty. I don't know if the fumes are actually toxic, but they sure as heck ain't perfume.

Looked around, and found a metal supplier here in Marietta, GA that carried a wide variety of expanded metal and hardware cloth, among which was some stainless steel hardware cloth.

Long story short: I have a good sized piece of stainless steel hardware cloth. I will be at the upcoming SoRuck at NOC, and would be happy to throw the s/s hardware cloth in the pickup if anyone wants a piece to work with.

Buggyman
2004-12-31, 20:31
I have a Trangia burner with the full Clikstand outfit and I really like it. Not the lightest set-up, but definitely one of the most stable and wind resistant. It seems very fuel efficient also. See www.clikstand.com. You can extinguish the flames on a Trangia by throwing the simmer ring on top of the stove, but it must must land perfectly to work. In my opinion the simmer ring doesn't work very well to simmer and it seems to me its main function should be to snuff the flame. If it doesn't land perfectly over the burner holes, the stove is still running. Don't use the screw on cap to extinguish the flames because you'll fry the rubber gasket inside the cap. Don't put the cap on at all untill the stove has cooled down, which takes relatively long with a Trangia compared to a soda can stove. It is possible to leave enough fuel in the stove for 3-4 burns with the cap screwed down. I have tried it and it doesn't leak in the pack. You can save a few ozs with the Trangia by not carrying the simmer ring and cap if you want. They are convienient, but not neccesary.:captain

Two Speed
2005-01-01, 13:14
I've seen surplus Swedish mess kits with Trangia burners, alcohol bottles, etc. advertised on the internet. I'm curious if anyone knows the history regarding how long the Swedes were issuing Trangia's, if they're still doing so, and what differences there are between the military issue stuff and the commercial stoves we're seeing now.

blackdog
2005-01-01, 17:34
The swedish military forces have used a very distinctive variation of the trangia setup called "snuskburk" (translates roughly to "filth-jar" or "goo-jar") for quite a long time now. My guess is that it has been in use since about 35 years back. The burner is the same we've all come to like, but the rest is different to say the least. The cooking vessels are elliptical, instead of round. Most are sold without the burner/windshield parts in the surplus stores, though.

You can find an image of the army variation here: http://www.armen.mil.se/ao01/images/local/snuskburk.jpg
Note that only the cooking pots are shown in the picture as i couldn't find a single picture on the net with the burner.

The food shown is banana, knäckebröd (an almost biscuit-like crispy and slightly salty bread made from rye that most often is eaten with butter and cheeze) and ravioli (freeze dried can be bought in surplus stores). All representative field food here.

...and I found yet another pot stand for an pepsi can burner made by Anders Jonsson, a swedish DIYer:

without burner: http://www.andersj.se/kok3/kok16.jpg
with burner http://www.andersj.se/kok3/kok17.jpg
collapsed: http://www.andersj.se/kok3/kok19.jpg

he also has a really good replacement for the trangia handle at roughly 20g:
new image: http://www.andersj.se/kok3/kok20.jpg
old image: http://www.andersj.se/kok1/kok9.jpg

You should expose yourself to some swedish by visiting Anders' home page, click "gördetsjälv" (DIY) and check out his constructions and patterns. Lots of goodies there if you don't get frustrated by the lack of english, that is...

http://www.andersj.se/

woodrat
2005-01-01, 17:46
you can get those surplus ones from ,cheaper than dirt,major surpus and survival, those are off the top of my head, I think I have seen them in a couple of other catologs, but will have to check.

Salvelinus
2005-01-01, 18:45
I'm strongly considering this kit (http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/hardanodized/50131.html) as it's less expensive and less weight than any comparable ti set that I"ve found...

I don't know if that set is anything like Calphalon, but if it is, I wouldn't buy it. I've had a regular Calphalon cooking set, and it is very difficult to maintain. It actually started to lose its anodization after about 8-10 years, turning silver inside.

--Scott

Lanthar
2005-01-03, 01:03
From what I've read, anodizing for cookware has come a long way in 8-10 years... plus since this will be used primarily for boiling water... shouldn't be much of an issue.


I don't know if that set is anything like Calphalon, but if it is, I wouldn't buy it. I've had a regular Calphalon cooking set, and it is very difficult to maintain. It actually started to lose its anodization after about 8-10 years, turning silver inside.

--Scott

JPW
2005-01-03, 15:20
For cold weather liteing try a liteing a small wad of TP. The alcohol has to get to 56 degrees to vaporize. I made a pot stand from a scrap of aluminum expanded metal. The gas from the galvanizing is toxic but I dont think its a problem unless your welding galvanized metal.

SGT Rock
2005-01-03, 22:21
Where did you find the SS Hardware cloth. I have been looking for that. I would love to get a piece if I can make it to the SoRuck.

Lanthar
2005-01-04, 00:10
SGT Rock, you can get it from McMaster Carr, www.mcmaster.com just do a search for mesh.

Two Speed
2005-01-04, 07:53
Will put bring the stainless hardware cloth to the SoRuck, along with the assortment of tools that I've found handy. If you make it, maybe we can find time to play around with it and see if we can't work something useful up.

If you can't make it, is there somebody that is going that could pick it up for you? From what I've seen on this site, I'm curious to see what you make out of it.

By the way, I hope that this cloth isn't for one of Dixiecritter's sewing projects. That crap is going to rough on the ol' Singer. :elefant:

Lanthar
2005-01-04, 11:28
I plan on ordering some 12x12s of different guages when year-end bonus comes through in a couple of weeks (along with some other gear - wife says I get to spoil myself ;) )

SGT Rock
2005-01-04, 21:26
I want to make a more durable stand for my newest Ion stove version. The BIS (Baghdad Ion Stove) I think is the name I am currently calling it. Here is a thread I wrote up about it while I was in Iraq: http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=749&

Two Speed
2005-01-05, 07:59
Looks like you're onto something there. The stainless would definitely be more durable. My limited experience leads me to believe the galvanized is going to get brittle after repeated use. Makes me want to try a piece of titanium for grins, but I suspect that will be chasing diminishing returns.

The piece of stainless I've got has the wire on 1/4" centers, about 0.2" clear opening. The stock I've got started at 2' x 4' and I have cut a few pieces out of that, but I don't think we'll have any problem cutting a piece that would allow you to build three or four prototypes, if that suits you. Heck, I wouldn't mind trying to make a few BIS stoves myself just for kicks.

Sgathak
2005-01-09, 20:08
I don't know if that set is anything like Calphalon, but if it is, I wouldn't buy it. I've had a regular Calphalon cooking set, and it is very difficult to maintain. It actually started to lose its anodization after about 8-10 years, turning silver inside.

--Scott

8 to 10 years ???? Really? Thats a problem?

Lanthar
2005-01-09, 23:04
8 to 10 years ???? Really? Thats a problem?

I was gonna say somethig to that effect...

Salvelinus
2005-01-10, 22:37
8 to 10 years ???? Really? Thats a problem?

For what we paid, yes. If it was a cheap dollar-store set, it would be different. This was supposed to be professional-grade cookware.

The loss of anodization is only the latest issue. Food sticks very badly to it, especially eggs. Get non-stick if you can.

--Scott

Sgathak
2005-01-10, 23:29
Even if you paid $500 for a full set of chef quality cookware, over the course of 10 years, thats a cost of only $50 a year.

Conversely, my $200 3 peice set of Teflon coated non-stick cookwear lasted exactly 2 years before the teflon delaminated. A cost of about $100 a year.

To get back to topic, Lanthar was talking about a $25 backpacking set of cookwear. Assuming even a 5 year working life, thats $5 a year... sounds like a good deal to me.

KLeth
2005-01-11, 01:53
Well the Non-stick version of the Trangia is well functioning but as said - It doesn't last. The aluminium version is ok, but food very easily burns and sticks to it if the meth-burner gets a bit too hot. The duossal (alu on the outside and stainless inside) version is a bit better but not in a weight league for ultralite hikers. Trangia has also made som very nice Ti pots and a pan that I really want to try next time we hit the trail. :biggrin: :biggrin:

(Deleted the rest of this entry, since it might be incorrect regarding citric acid (also due to the flaming), but try wrapping half a lemon in household aluminium foil and leave it for 3-4 hours)

blackdog
2005-01-11, 17:42
I wonder if it would be possible to produce something like a duossal pot, but with the stainless steel replaced by Ti? With a thin layer of aluminium and an even thinner Ti inside? Another possibility would be an Al pot with a "sprayed-on" surface of Ti? The pots and pans at home are Ti on Al and it's the best non-stick surface I've ever tried. Tough too.

Lanthar
2005-01-11, 18:27
We use the doussal (with a gas burner) since we use our Trangia very often and for long duration trips and we don't want to ingest that amount of aluminium. Also our favorite, Blueberry-soup (http://www.bimseland.dk/Abisko/Blaabaer2.htm) will dissolve quite a lot of aluminium on its own.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!?!? Boiling fruit (aka some citric acid) could dissolve some aluminum... that might be a fun science experiment... see how much you could boil off... of course, HA aluminum would be less of a problem as aluminum oxide isn't attacked by much and the HA has an extra thick layer of that... but maybe the blueberry juice dissolves HA... hmm...

blackdog
2005-01-12, 11:33
Called the people at trangia today (nice people btw.) and asked them about the "duotial" idea. The reply I got was that such a pot would be possible to make, but that it would be too expensive to market.

I also took the liberty to show the trangia people this very site, so one of them might drop in on your conversation, or they might choose not to. I bet they will be watching, though.

KLeth
2005-01-12, 17:08
I wonder if it would be possible to produce something like a duossal pot, but with the stainless steel replaced by Ti? With a thin layer of aluminium and an even thinner Ti inside? Another possibility would be an Al pot with a "sprayed-on" surface of Ti? The pots and pans at home are Ti on Al and it's the best non-stick surface I've ever tried. Tough too.

Yes, here in the nordic region we have a kitchenware producer "Scanpan" that produces cookware of AL and some sort of ceramic/TI coating on the inside. It's way too heavy for hikers but the products are cheap and very durable/scratch resistant (Got quite a few myself).

Salvelinus
2005-01-14, 19:20
The duossal (alu on the outside and stainless inside) version is a bit better but not in a weight league for ultralite hikers.

I like the stainless idea, but agree that the weight would be prohibitive. What about the "other" Wally-world grease pot? It's made by Ekco, of thin-guage stainless steel. Anyone try it?

--Scott

Iceman
2005-01-17, 02:18
OK, finally got out and used the new trangia stove. Worked Ok, on snow at about only 28 degrees. One problem was the stove has a tendency of slowly sinking into the snowpack, and snuffing off the air supply. (I did stomp a serious pad to rest the stove on.) I think I will devise a skid to place beneath it like I do for my other stoves. I was surprised to see this much sinkage considering the height Trangia builds into their kits. Burner started off about two inches off the snow. After a bit I had snow pushing its way up throught the breather holes around the stove, sort of like a playdo hair toy- you know what I mean..... Actually snuffed itself out once before I figured out what was happening. I was able to cook up a lunch for four with the stove, including lots of hot drinks on two fillings of fuel line dryer. No moving parts is OK with me, and no real rush here.... My pressure stoves do work quicker, but sometimes less is more. Felt like an old svede', oy vey! Whatever....

Lanthar
2005-01-17, 18:19
you using the trainga snow attachement?

SGT Rock
2005-01-17, 22:18
OK, finally got out and used the new trangia stove. Worked Ok, on snow at about only 28 degrees. One problem was the stove has a tendency of slowly sinking into the snowpack, and snuffing off the air supply. (I did stomp a serious pad to rest the stove on.) I think I will devise a skid to place beneath it like I do for my other stoves. I was surprised to see this much sinkage considering the height Trangia builds into their kits. Burner started off about two inches off the snow. After a bit I had snow pushing its way up throught the breather holes around the stove, sort of like a playdo hair toy- you know what I mean..... Actually snuffed itself out once before I figured out what was happening. I was able to cook up a lunch for four with the stove, including lots of hot drinks on two fillings of fuel line dryer. No moving parts is OK with me, and no real rush here.... My pressure stoves do work quicker, but sometimes less is more. Felt like an old svede', oy vey! Whatever....

I have been working with my son on his science project for school.The boy decided to do one on guess what - alcohol stove efficiency. He built 3 stoves (Cat, Soda Can, and Ion) and used the Trangia as his control. As we sat there watching the things and playing with them, I decided to try making an Ion with the same kind of "off the ground" sort of pot support that the Trangia used - basically suspending the Ion about 1/2" above the ground surface, that little trick increased my Ion stove to the point where it actually beat the Trangia for fuel efficency and time to boil, but added about 2 grams to the stove weight. I never thought I would make it there. I plan to take that one out and play with it in the field with winter conditions sometime this week.

The Trangia keeps teaching me some tricks, great stove, hard to beat.

Iceman
2005-01-17, 23:16
you using the trainga snow attachement?

No, my mind was elsewhere let's just say...(a little bonehead mistake of mine.) What I have made in the past is a micro thin aluminum deck that I attach my pressure (Brunton Nova) stove to with a few wing nuts. This arrangement in the past is nice cause it reflects the heat back up, and spans enough snow to negate the melt factor. With a few holes around the perimeter I push a couple of tent pegs thru to lock the device in position. The arrangement isn't ultra light, but I most always am dragging a pulk behind me on my snowshoes, and carry alot of extras due to the ease of the sled (weight isn't a problem in the winter). I am a big guy and when I lean forward, things move. I will probably create a deck to set the trangia on in the same way.

Hey Sarge, I am learning a bunch from all you guys, and was impressed with the alcohol stove. Maybe I will build a lightweight one for myself for my spring and summer solo-outings, when the snow fades. For now, the larger unit isn't such a bother, besides, I am cooking for my wife, two kids (6 and 8yrs) and myself. Planning an overnight snow trip in the next few weekends to include my 6yr old daughter to join us, for her first overnight snow tent trip. Sleds are ready to go, and I will report back how the alcohol stove did for the weekend. May have to wait, lot's of rain scheduled out west. Rain + snow= no fun. Later.

SGT Rock
2005-01-18, 08:43
If I get some time I will write up the final stove design and numbers we tested it on. What impressed me was this stove performed with 50 degree mountain water in a 65 degree room with cold alcohol as a starting point. While that doesn't sound all that cold, the fact is this little stove actually outperformed (slightly) the Trangia in the exact same conditions. And these conditions are colder than the old test standards I use when I was stationed in LA. I think a test outside (it is currently in the teens here) with creek water from my creek should give a fair assessment of how well this stove will perform in the field. So far my only issue is the stove weight - it is 1.0 ounces with windscreen, I was hoping to keep it under an ounce.

DebW
2005-01-22, 09:37
To prevent the stove sinking into snow, try a piece of foam pad wrapped in aluminum foil. Using your snowshoe isn't recommended...

Regarding the Trangia, I've had mine boil over a number of times when I filled it very full. Luckily it was in a pot stand with a solid bottom to contain the flaming liquid. I find the fuel overheats and shoots flame too high when I use a windscreen around the pot.

Iceman
2005-01-22, 12:17
DebW, thanks. I actually know better. I have used the mousepad/foil trick before, and then went to a solid alum. sheet with a few hold down wing nuts, for my other winter stoves. Just "zoned-out" and forgot this trip. Our snow out west here, is really poor this year (nonexistent), and we have not been getting out much. Hopefully you are fairing better back east. Thanks!

Iceman
2005-02-22, 01:39
This weekend I noticed an unusual smell coming from my trangia set up. It appears that if you are not paying attention, and fail to notice that the rubber "O-ring" has remain attached to the burner instead of staying inside the stove cap, that after a few minutes,...a unique stench eminates from your stove. My exuse is that it was a bit dark out, and very cold. I think after I order one of the freebie replacement O-rings, I will install it with a dab of polyurethane to secure it inside the cap. Other observations, "Heet" really doesn't like to burn at 10deg F. (No winter attachment yet) Not sure I really want the winter attachment, cause after a bit of warm up time, the stove worked well. Melted a ton of snow to feed my family of four a bunch of hot jello and cocoa, with our meals this weekend. Would like a bit faster action, but it was really a cold weekend. Sledding the gear in is nice because you can bring heavyweight extras. Lots of food, even some wine to warm up... Except for the O ring fire, did have fun with the stove!

Two Speed
2005-02-22, 18:32
. . . The Trangia keeps teaching me some tricks, great stove, hard to beat.
The more I play with a Trangia, the more I suspect that the original engineers really tweaked that sucker. It really is a tremendously subtle piece of engineering. No moving parts, dead reliable, highly efficient, extremely durable. If that doesn't embody the best of Old World engineering, I don't know what does.

I realize the Trangia is heavier than the Ion Stove and some of the other newer designs, but I can't help but suspect that we are following in the foot steps of some very talented engineers.

Sgt. Rock, if anyone can beat Trangia with a lighter, more efficient stove with equal durability, it's probably you. Don't get me wrong, I'm cheering for you, but I can't help but suspect you've got your work cut out for you.

SGT Rock
2005-02-23, 20:02
Except maybe for the durable part, I think I have it beat in performance, but some people like the ability to store some fuel in the stove. To each his own.

JPW
2005-02-24, 15:33
I like to refill it for the morning and keep it in the bag with me at night. But I want to get one of SGT Rocks for day hikes ( and my growing stove collection ) when they are available.

SGT Rock
2005-02-24, 18:12
Hey, thinking of making a Trangia "Ionization Kit" which would basically be a titanium TiPod sort of thing specially made for the Trangia, and a windscreen made from my material that you could use with the Trangia burner. Any thoughts?

Aussie Nutter
2005-02-25, 02:16
I have both the large trangia which is very efficient and its little brother called a mini trangia. Mini trangia uses same burner as the large one but has no storm shield and only consists of the burner and a pot stand. Although it is very light the mini trangia is extreamly thirsty on juice and uses as much as 3 times the fuel of the larger model because it looses so much heat to the passing breeze.
My tip is to make a super light storm shield to save weight on the bulky trangia bits and scrap all the pots and pans except one bowl. Storm shield is worth more then its weight in fuel.

woodrat
2005-02-25, 03:04
I just recieved my mil. surplus trangia today and it is mint condition, never been used. found a site that sells them for $5.00. if anyone wants their site address feel free to p.m. me .

Mr. Clean
2005-02-26, 13:46
I have a Trangis, I guess it's the westwind, and think it's okay, 'bout the same as my coke can stove (thanks, Rock!). But I don't like the stand for it. It seems very bulky, even though it's very stable. I'd be interested in a stand/windscreen concept for it, but really also like the coke can stove. Not sure why some times I take one, and others take the other.

woodrat
2005-02-26, 17:19
Hey, thinking of making a Trangia "Ionization Kit" which would basically be a titanium TiPod sort of thing specially made for the Trangia, and a windscreen made from my material that you could use with the Trangia burner. Any thoughts?
hey top, my thought is make 4 for military trangia's and i'll buy them, good luck! if you need one to work on i'll be glad to loan you one of mine.

Two Speed
2005-02-26, 22:16
I have a Trangis, I guess it's the westwind . . . But I don't like the stand for it. It seems very bulky, even though it's very stable.
Doesn't sound like the Westwind. The Westwind is three pieces of interlocking sheet steel similar in concept to Sgt. Rock's titanium stand. Could the one you have be one of the stock Trangia stands? Haven't bothered to aquire one of those, and probably won't because my Westwind leaves little to be desired, IMHO.

SGT Rock
2005-02-27, 18:44
hey top, my thought is make 4 for military trangia's and i'll buy them, good luck! if you need one to work on i'll be glad to loan you one of mine.

I have a Trangia Westwind, If the dimensions are the same as the surplus ones, then it will be all good. When I get home next week I'll post the dimensions and we can see how close they are, if they are not close, maybe there is a way to make one work with both stoves.

oops56
2005-10-25, 05:21
Well those trangia are good but i got a jiffy heat 20 or so yrs. ago just got two more on e bay.Made like trangia about same size they fit same place in all trangia set ups.Ony thing they dont have cap to save fuel but here the best part 1/2 oz alcohol boil 12 oz water 3 min.Not only that it comes in a two peice box 2 1/2 by2/12 pus a wire cross that sits on stove for pot stand also can use box for stand.forgot its all alum :rolleyes:

oops56
2005-10-25, 05:23
I just received a trangia stove I ordered off the web, and gave it the backyard work out. Anyone have any thoughs or issues I should be concerned with? Stove seems really well made, burns well, pots all nest nice. I am a bit concerned about fuel consumption. Any thoughs you can share would be appreciated. ThanksForgot its all alum